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'solid state switches for signal wires'
1999\09\30@221444 by Jon Petty

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Hi everyone

I need my PIC to intercept some sensor signals (when needed) and also have
the ability to pass them through. I have used small relays for this before. I
don't have the room on the board to put relays. We are talking small signal
current less then 2mA.

What kind of solid state switches are there that don't have a voltage drop. I
don't want to affect the signal.

I have never used bus drivers would something like that work? Could you
recommend Part numbers?

Any other ideas?


Jon

1999\09\30@224151 by David Covick

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face
Jon,

You could try the Analog Devices ADG751, ADG752, ADG714 or ADG715

These have about 2 to 15 ohm "on" resistance depending which one you select.
IIC or SPI interface on the 714 and 715.

http://www.analog.com

David



> Hi everyone
>
> I need my PIC to intercept some sensor signals (when needed) and also have
> the ability to pass them through. I have used small relays for this
before. I
> don't have the room on the board to put relays. We are talking small
signal
> current less then 2mA.
>
> What kind of solid state switches are there that don't have a voltage
drop. I
{Quote hidden}

1999\09\30@224826 by Matthew Ballinger

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   A 4066 quad bilateral switch (CMOS) will be pretty easy to find and use.
I've used them in past pic projects successfully. On resistance is about 200
ohms ( a bit high), but sufices for most signals.
Matt B

> > Hi everyone
>  >
>  > I need my PIC to intercept some sensor signals (when needed) and also
have
{Quote hidden}

1999\09\30@231403 by Steve Kelley

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Jon . . . .
What sort of signal are you concerned with ?  Is it a D.C. or A.C.  signal  ?
What is the signal voltage level ?  What is the signal frequency , if A.C. ?

If you are looking to simply pass a D.C. current , then a mosfet will have the lowest
*on* resistance , and drop very little of the signal.  However , once you have the
other spec.'s  available it may be that  a * line-buffer* would serve your purpose.

Believe it or not the old  * MC1488 and MC 1489 * pair still serve some app.'s

Regards . . . .
                       Steve



{Original Message removed}

1999\09\30@233923 by David Covick

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Jon,

Also, Maxim has a new improved 4066 replacement part.  The MAX4066.  About
100 ohms R, depending on voltage to the chip.  Bandwidth of 100 MHz.

David




> Hi everyone
>
> I need my PIC to intercept some sensor signals (when needed) and also have
> the ability to pass them through. I have used small relays for this
before. I
> don't have the room on the board to put relays. We are talking small
signal
> current less then 2mA.
>
> What kind of solid state switches are there that don't have a voltage
drop. I
{Quote hidden}

1999\09\30@233932 by Graham, Peter

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face
Hi Jon

You could try the MAX312,313,314 from Maxim. These have a typical on
resistance of 10ohms or the DG417,418,419 from Silconix and Maxim that have
a typical on resistance of
20 ohms. These parts will allow a maximum of +/- 15 to +/-20 volt on the
lines.

I haven't used the 312 - 314 but the 417- 419's work well.

Peter G
> {Original Message removed}


'solid state switches for signal wires'
1999\10\01@011450 by Jon Petty
picon face
The application is 0-5 volts ,DC automotive application. They are sensor
signals

Thanks

Jon




In a message dated 9/30/99 8:14:17 PM US Mountain Standard Time,
spam_OUTDigital-EngineeringTakeThisOuTspamMSN.COM writes:

<< Jon . . . .
What sort of signal are you concerned with ?  Is it a D.C. or A.C.  signal  ?
What is the signal voltage level ?  What is the signal frequency , if A.C. ?

If you are looking to simply pass a D.C. current , then a mosfet will have
the lowest
*on* resistance , and drop very little of the signal.  However , once you
have the
other spec.'s  available it may be that  a * line-buffer* would serve your
purpose.

Believe it or not the old  * MC1488 and MC 1489 * pair still serve some
app.'s

Regards . . . .
                        Steve  >>

1999\10\01@025859 by Bob Wake

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face
> What kind of solid state switches are there that don't have a voltage drop. I
> don't want to affect the signal.

Try DG211's, TTL input, very low RDSon!

1999\10\01@083830 by paulb

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face
Jon Petty wrote:

> What kind of solid state switches are there that don't have a voltage
> drop.

 None really.

> I have never used bus drivers would something like that work?

 "Bus drivers" are singularly heavy-duty *digital* inverters/ buffers.
Not analog.

 I think the 74HC4066 has a substantially lower Ron and other better
characteristics than the older 4066, and works on 0 to 5V beautifully,
if not a wider range depending perhaps on brand.  I suggest this as it
should be more readily available and cheaper than the other dedicated
parts.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1999\10\01@114208 by Andre Abelian

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Jon,

you might want to try analog switches. one of them is 4066
better one is DG411 by  HARRIS microchip uses this part in
picstart + too. the resistance is about 40 ohms.

Andre Abelian


> Hi everyone
>
> I need my PIC to intercept some sensor signals (when needed) and also have
> the ability to pass them through. I have used small relays for this
before. I
> don't have the room on the board to put relays. We are talking small
signal
> current less then 2mA.
>
> What kind of solid state switches are there that don't have a voltage
drop. I
{Quote hidden}

1999\10\01@124035 by Wagner Lipnharski

picon face
John, you can search for several suppliers of analog switching chips,
there are a pretty high competition in the market for this kind of
devices.

Just remember that no one is perfect, no one gets even close to a relay
contact, doesn't matter the cost of the unit.  Good ones, switching
resistance of 10 Ohms of less, cost more, and even so, you will be
limited by its VCC supply less the rails limits...  if you supply the
unit with 5V, probably your switching signal will be limited  between
+0.6 and +4.4 Volts. Even with a small 2mA signal current, you will see
a voltage drop of about 20mV or more in this expensive unit, and the
response linearity is quite poor for high frequencies.

A relay contact, as you know, allows any kind of voltage level and
frequency. The smaller relays have a better response over the large
ones.  Aromat has some very tinny devices, equivalent of a regular .3
dip 12 pins chip.
I already used one latching relay of this size, cost about $3.50, so,
cheaper than a good chip, and works much better, with a peak current of
3mA 50ms to latch it, and no current from the supply to unlatch it. You
just need a logic gate output and a 50uF capacitor to do it, probably
the PIC port output can do it nicely.

What is the average power consume per switch of a nice analog switch
microchip?

I am not sponsoring the use of relays, but never put away the
possibility to use them as a good solution.

Electronic analog switching already made several improvements, CPClare
has several nice solutions, limited by actual necessity of the market,
but this technology has a long way to go if you think to generalize its
use.

Wagner

1999\10\01@133619 by William K. Borsum

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face
aromat AQV 212 solid state relays will switch at around 2 volts and <2 mA
of current.  <1 ohm on resistance.  Digikey carries them.
Kelly


At 10:13 PM 9/30/99 EDT, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

William K. Borsum, P.E. -- OEM Dataloggers and Instrumentation Systems
<.....borsumKILLspamspam@spam@dascor.com> & <http://www.dascor.com>San Diego, California, USA

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