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'[PICLIST] [PIC] [AD] New opensource website www.op'
2000\06\28@121844 by Michael Damon Hopkins

flavicon
face
OpenPic.com is now up and running.. I have a mailing list setup (no
subscribers on it yet)
This site is going to be for the support and development of various
projects w/ an opensource attitude.
I haven't worked out what type of licensing arrangemnt i'll have (maybe
a BSD approach) But I the END goal of the projets should be that people
people should always be able to get the code for free and then mod it,
tweak it sell it distribute it, whatever they want to it.

I desperatly need help not only with the actual development of the
projects but also the managerial aspect of the site itself. I need your
input.
I already have some datasheets setup for a few nvram devices..
some ideas for a few projects..

tcp/ip stack
I2C and SPI LCD control
I2C and SPI eeprom control
I2C and SPI SRAM (maybe 30 pin simms) control

basically a project would be a set of REUSABLE code and schematics that
can be used for application specific devices
like I'm currently working out the code to control a Crystal
Semiconductor CS8900a ethernet transceiver so I can connect PICs to the
Internet w/out a gateway PC. much like the http://www.embeddedethernet.com
site. only I will have a smaller dedicated PIC controlling the chip and
probably use Serial access (maybe SPI or I2C) that way I can devote the
majority of my codebase to sensor reading or other applications instead
of worring about using the 2K of codespace to control the cs8900a.

we have all seen the $50+ serial LCD's why not a project to develop one
using a small pic, a pcb, a generic HD47780 LCD?? and then give it away.
sound like fun??

come check it out and join the list.

                       Damon Hopkins


http://www.openpic.com

2000\06\28@125422 by Scott Dattalo

face
flavicon
face
On Wed, 28 Jun 2000, Michael Damon Hopkins wrote:

> OpenPic.com is now up and running.. I have a mailing list setup (no
> subscribers on it yet)

I wish you luck, but ...

----

You may wish to subscribe to the gnupic mailing list (see http://www.gnupic.org/
) and post this announcement there. The gnupic site is devoted towards PIC
developement tools and so it doesn't really conflict with your openpic project.
However, the people subscribed there would more likely be inclined to subscribe
to your list.

Scott

PS. Sorry for the previous (crabby) post.

2000\06\28@140948 by Andrew Kunz

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face
Source code for an LCD interface with arbitrary display is now available at
http://www.piclist.com

Click on FAQ, then Routines, then IO, then Andy Kunz.  Or something like that.

Anyway, it's there, happy hunting, and it's GPL so enjoy!

It will be on the Tech Tools site soon too.

Andy









Michael Damon Hopkins <spam_OUTmdhopkinTakeThisOuTspamUNITY.NCSU.EDU> on 06/28/2000 12:17:16 PM

Please respond to pic microcontroller discussion list <.....PICLISTKILLspamspam@spam@MITVMA.MIT.EDU>








To:      PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU

cc:      (bcc: Andrew Kunz/TDI_NOTES)



Subject: [PIC] [AD] New opensource website http://www.openpic.com








OpenPic.com is now up and running.. I have a mailing list setup (no
subscribers on it yet)
This site is going to be for the support and development of various
projects w/ an opensource attitude.
I haven't worked out what type of licensing arrangemnt i'll have (maybe
a BSD approach) But I the END goal of the projets should be that people
people should always be able to get the code for free and then mod it,
tweak it sell it distribute it, whatever they want to it.

I desperatly need help not only with the actual development of the
projects but also the managerial aspect of the site itself. I need your
input.
I already have some datasheets setup for a few nvram devices..
some ideas for a few projects..

tcp/ip stack
I2C and SPI LCD control
I2C and SPI eeprom control
I2C and SPI SRAM (maybe 30 pin simms) control

basically a project would be a set of REUSABLE code and schematics that
can be used for application specific devices
like I'm currently working out the code to control a Crystal
Semiconductor CS8900a ethernet transceiver so I can connect PICs to the
Internet w/out a gateway PC. much like the http://www.embeddedethernet.com
site. only I will have a smaller dedicated PIC controlling the chip and
probably use Serial access (maybe SPI or I2C) that way I can devote the
majority of my codebase to sensor reading or other applications instead
of worring about using the 2K of codespace to control the cs8900a.

we have all seen the $50+ serial LCD's why not a project to develop one
using a small pic, a pcb, a generic HD47780 LCD?? and then give it away.
sound like fun??

come check it out and join the list.

                       Damon Hopkins


http://www.openpic.com


'[OT]: Spam (was: RE: OpenSystems remove list)'
2001\01\04@141058 by jamesnewton
face picon face
It is extremely obvious that you have mined the email addresses of the
member of the PICList to add to your spam list. I can assure you that this
was done against their will. We have polled our membership several times in
the past and always received a clear indication that they did not wish to
receive unsolicited email.

If you want to keep us from complaining to every one of the advertisers who
you spam us on behalf of, you should mine the PICList emails again but this
time, remove them, rather than add them to your list.

I will be happy to eat my hat if you can show me any significant percentage
of our 1900 member list that actually WANTS to receive your spam.

---
James Newton (PICList Admin #3)
.....jamesnewtonKILLspamspam.....piclist.com 1-619-652-0593
PIC/PICList FAQ: http://www.piclist.com or .org

{Original Message removed}


'[EE]: A new world opens up...'
2003\04\27@202022 by Picdude
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part 1 1041 bytes content-type:text/plain; (decoded quoted-printable)

Been meaning to try hand-soldering a SOIC surface-mount for a long time, but finally felt fearless today.  With a small scrap of PCB, I laid out a few SOIC patterns and hand-soldered it with a regular Weller SP12 soldering iron....  very small, light, and low-cost ($13), with a decently small tip (though I've seen smaller-tipped irons).  Pic of this first attempt attached.

I've electrically tested it, and it seems to all be good.  Whereas it's not aesthetically perfect, neither was my first attempt at regular thru-hole soldering.  No magnifier used either.  Chip is a 50-mil pitch generic 74LS244 I picked up for a few cents some time back.

Please, no comments on the scrap PCB, which I cut with a pair of scissors.

This opens up a new world to me, and I highly recommend it to anyone else who's been sceptical.

Cheers,
-Neil.


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part 2 10249 bytes content-type:image/jpeg; (decode)


part 3 2 bytes
-

2003\04\27@202849 by Herbert Graf

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{Quote hidden}

       Way to go, it actually looks far better then MY first attempt... SOIC
soldering isn't too bad, solder wick is generally the only additional tool I
need over what I use for through hole soldering, and I've been needing it
much less frequently.

       I find for SOIC a regular tip is usable, while a fine tip is far better a
regular tip will do. Now of course since you've crossed this bridge you must
go smaller! Those tiny 4 resistor resistor packs are REAL fun to hand
solder! :) One good thing about being nearsighted as I am is you don't need
a magnifying glass, I just hold everything close to my eyes. People around
me always ask whether I can actually see anything that close... :) TTYL

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2003\04\27@210516 by Jinx

face picon face
> This opens up a new world to me, and I highly recommend it to
> anyone else who's been sceptical

Fun, eh ? I was particularly pleased I could do this when the only
AVRs in stock were SMT. Dead easy to make an SMT to DIP
adapter

Here's something to try next -

Get a scrap PCB that's stuffed full of all kinds of interesting SMT chips.
Take to the non-chip side with a blowtorch, bang it on the bench, and
watch the chips drop off like flies

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2003\04\27@214909 by Picdude

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Need to go pick up some more el-cheapo SOIC's.

There's an interesting local electronics store that's run by a nice elderly gentleman. The place is dusty, many parts are from another era, but many are quite up-to-date.  Looks like he buys a lot of closeouts.  Best part is his prices -- I'll go in there and grab a few dozen chips, connectors, several dozen capacitors, transistors, etc.  I'd be estimating about $40-$50 at digikey-ish prices.  He'll split out the high-dollar items, write up a bill for those and chuck the rest in the bag, then tell me.... $10.  Hobbyist's paradise.

Cheers,
-Neil.



On Sunday 27 April 2003 20:06, Jinx wrote:
> Here's something to try next -
>
> Get a scrap PCB that's stuffed full of all kinds of interesting SMT chips.
> Take to the non-chip side with a blowtorch, bang it on the bench, and
> watch the chips drop off like flies

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2003\04\27@215323 by Picdude

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On Sunday 27 April 2003 20:06, Jinx wrote:
> Get a scrap PCB that's stuffed full of all kinds of interesting SMT chips.
> Take to the non-chip side with a blowtorch, bang it on the bench, and
> watch the chips drop off like flies


You really really really need to get out more.  Or stand on your head and see life like we do in the northern hemisphere.
:-)

Cheers,
-Neil.

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2003\04\27@221644 by Picdude

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On Sunday 27 April 2003 19:27, Herbert Graf wrote:
>         Way to go, it actually looks far better then MY first attempt...
> SOIC soldering isn't too bad, solder wick is generally the only additional
> tool I need over what I use for through hole soldering, and I've been
> needing it much less frequently.
>
>         I find for SOIC a regular tip is usable, while a fine tip is far
> better a regular tip will do. Now of course since you've crossed this
> bridge you must go smaller! Those tiny 4 resistor resistor packs are REAL
> fun to hand solder! :) One good thing about being nearsighted as I am is
> you don't need a magnifying glass, I just hold everything close to my eyes.
> People around me always ask whether I can actually see anything that
> close... :) TTYL


The thing I really want to try next is using thinner solder.  I was using .032, but can find solder less than half that diameter.

Cheers,
-Neil.

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2003\04\28@001645 by Herbert Graf

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{Quote hidden}

       Yes thinner solder can help. The BIGGEST thing while soldering anything
surface mount is keep the amount of solder low, too much just means you have
to start over... :) TTYL

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2003\04\28@010908 by Ned Konz

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On Sunday 27 April 2003 09:12 pm, Herbert Graf wrote:

> > The thing I really want to try next is using thinner solder.  I
> > was using .032, but can find solder less than half that diameter.
>
>         Yes thinner solder can help. The BIGGEST thing while
> soldering anything surface mount is keep the amount of solder low,
> too much just means you have to start over... :) TTYL

However, solder that's too thin (for instance, 0.010 inches in
diameter) doesn't hold very much flux.

So you have to use separate flux for good results.

0.015 or 0.017 is marginal.

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GPG key ID: BEEA7EFE

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2003\04\28@012604 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
>> Need to go pick up some more el-cheapo SOIC's.

microcontrollers on eBay tend to be cheaper in SOIC, I think.  Less
demand, I guess.

Hey, guess what?  A standard sdram DIMM socket has springy contacts on
.05inch centers, and I think there is some potential that you might be
able to realtively easily convert such a DIMM socket into a ZIF-like
programming socket for SOIC parts.  More if I actually get a round tuit.

BillW

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2003\04\28@022325 by Picdude

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Hmmm... I'll have to keep tabs on Ebay then.  Thanks.

Got one of those 3M springy-clip things laying around, into which I'll wire my Tait programmer.  See Digikey part #923660-28.  Must go look for it though...

Cheers,
-Neil.


On Monday 28 April 2003 00:25, William Chops Westfield wrote:
> microcontrollers on eBay tend to be cheaper in SOIC, I think.  Less
> demand, I guess.
>
> Hey, guess what?  A standard sdram DIMM socket has springy contacts on
> .05inch centers, and I think there is some potential that you might be
> able to realtively easily convert such a DIMM socket into a ZIF-like
> programming socket for SOIC parts.  More if I actually get a round tuit.
>
> BillW

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2003\04\28@073743 by Olin Lathrop

face picon face
>>> The thing I really want to try next is using thinner solder.  I
>>> was using .032, but can find solder less than half that diameter.
>>
>>         Yes thinner solder can help. The BIGGEST thing while
>> soldering anything surface mount is keep the amount of solder low,
>> too much just means you have to start over... :) TTYL
>
> However, solder that's too thin (for instance, 0.010 inches in
> diameter) doesn't hold very much flux.
>
> So you have to use separate flux for good results.
>
> 0.015 or 0.017 is marginal.

I keep two sizes of solder around here.  The .031" (.8mm) is for most
purposes (like all thru-hole work), and .020" for fine.  Anything that
requires finer solder than that also requires a different technique than a
soldering iron in one hand and wire solder in the other.


*****************************************************************
Embed Inc, embedded system specialists in Littleton Massachusetts
(978) 742-9014, http://www.embedinc.com

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2003\04\29@045840 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>The thing I really want to try next is using thinner
>solder.  I was using  .032, but can find solder less
>than half that diameter.

You will find that using the correct diameter solder is the biggest step to
making neat looking hand soldered SMD joints. Go for it, it is great fun.

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2003\04\29@203351 by Jinx

face picon face
>> Get a scrap PCB that's stuffed full of all kinds of interesting SMT
>> chips. Take to the non-chip side with a blowtorch, bang it on the
>> bench, and watch the chips drop off like flies

> You really really really need to get out more

I agree. But 2 out of 3 psychologists can't ;-)

Although I use the blowtorch method just for stripping parts a couple
of technician friends do actually use it in repair work. It takes a little
practice to remove a 100 pin QFP without cooking the chip or PCB
but it really can be done

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2003\04\29@204136 by Marc Nicholas

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Can't you just use a high-temp hot air gun?!

On 29/4/03 20:26, "Jinx" <EraseMEjoecolquittspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTCLEAR.NET.NZ> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

--------------------------------------------------
Marc Nicholas Geekythings Inc. C/416.543.4896
UNIX, Database, Security and Networking Consulting

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2003\04\29@212148 by Jinx

face picon face
> Can't you just use a high-temp hot air gun?!

Possibly, but I don't got one (it died) to try that out

The technician friends use the little butane pencil torches, which
must concentrate the heat in a small area in a short time. I know
that one of the things they do is to put revised OTPs or chipsets
in telcom equipment. With quite a number of boards to do they
get plenty of practice

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2003\04\29@212340 by Picdude

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On Tuesday 29 April 2003 19:26, Jinx scribbled:
> >> Get a scrap PCB that's stuffed full of all kinds of interesting SMT
> >> chips. Take to the non-chip side with a blowtorch, bang it on the
> >> bench, and watch the chips drop off like flies
> >
> > You really really really need to get out more
>
> I agree. But 2 out of 3 psychologists can't ;-)
>
> Although I use the blowtorch method just for stripping parts a couple
> of technician friends do actually use it in repair work. It takes a little
> practice to remove a 100 pin QFP without cooking the chip or PCB
> but it really can be done

It's actually a great idea, but having a vague image of you from your website a long time ago, I have a fuzzy image in my mind of you with a wide ear-to-ear grin, a PCB in one hand, and a flamethrower in the other.  :-)

Unfortunately, I don't have any old SMT boards laying around, so it was off to the store of me.

Cheers,
-Neil.

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2003\04\29@230447 by Jinx

face picon face
> I have a fuzzy image in my mind of you with a wide ear-to-ear grin,
> a PCB in one hand, and a flamethrower in the other.  :-)

Maniacal cackling. Don't forget the maniacal cackling. And nothing
says "bug off" like a flame-thrower

About time we had a rogues gallery of list members. I know what
probably 1/2 dozen members look like. It's not very common for
people to put their mugshot on a webpage. Why is that ? Cameras
are very accessible nowadays. I had the cojones (credit card details
gets you a look at those) to put mine up, how about some others
do likewise ?

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2003\04\29@232934 by Spehro Pefhany

picon face
At 03:03 PM 4/30/2003 +1200, you wrote:


>About time we had a rogues gallery of list members. I know what
>probably 1/2 dozen members look like. It's not very common for
>people to put their mugshot on a webpage. Why is that ?

Probably people who use their full real names are a bit more reticent to
put additional details out there for possible abuse.

Best regards,

Spehro Pefhany --"it's the network..."            "The Journey is the reward"
speffspamspam_OUTinterlog.com             Info for manufacturers: http://www.trexon.com
Embedded software/hardware/analog  Info for designers:  http://www.speff.com

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2003\04\29@234547 by Lyle Hazelwood

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>>About time we had a rogues gallery of list members. I know what
>>probably 1/2 dozen members look like. It's not very common for
>>people to put their mugshot on a webpage. Why is that ?

>Probably people who use their full real names are a bit more reticent to
>put additional details out there for possible abuse.

Speaking only for myself, I think you have the "abuse" part backwards.
I spare you all a look at my mug out of respect.
You folks are way too nice to be subjected to such an image. Better
that I keep my photo to myself and be thought a handsome fool than to
show you that I'm really just an ugly one. 8^)

Keep Smiling,
Lyle

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2003\04\29@235235 by Jinx

face picon face
> Probably people who use their full real names are a bit more
> reticent to put additional details out there for possible abuse.

I've no strong feelings either way wrt to photos, but my name is
part of my domain and I wouldn't say it's created any problems.
Unless I had a good reason to (eg for sales) I wouldn't put a
physical address on a page. But only because it's unnecessary,
not because I want to avoid anything. A PO Box for would be
OK but even that gives the impression of trying to stay unseen
or elusive. Maybe that's just me - I would try not to deal with
anyone who has just a PO Box address

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2003\04\30@012101 by Mike Singer

picon face
Jinx wrote:
> ...Unless I had a good reason to (eg for sales) I
> wouldn't put a physical address on a page...

Hi Jinx,
it's cool. Put your exact GPS location on your Web
page in real time. (PICs should be involved, of course).
They say few centimeters accuracy could be achieved.
Imagine your home in 3D on the Web page and little
Jinx coming to kitchen or to solder PICs or elsewhere.
In real time. Famous Harry Potter in other words.
(We just finished both Harry Potters with my kid)

Mike :-) :-) :-)

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2003\04\30@031909 by Picdude

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ROTFLMAO!

Though I have a partially-interpretable image of me on my website (somewhere), you certainly won't get me to sign up for a PIC gallery.  Only out of courtesy to the other members.  :-)

Cheers,
-Neil.



On Tuesday 29 April 2003 22:03, Jinx scribbled:
{Quote hidden}

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2003\04\30@031918 by Picdude

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Safety and complexity has dictated that I keep my home address to myself.  Since I've had 7 addresses in the past 4 years, I've had one point of contact -- my mailbox.  And after the having the 3rd vehicle stolen, all my formal/official docs have my mailbox addr as well.

Cheers,
-Neil.



On Tuesday 29 April 2003 22:53, Jinx scribbled:
{Quote hidden}

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2003\04\30@041723 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
   Imagine your home in 3D on the Web page and little
   Jinx coming to kitchen or to solder PICs or elsewhere.

Back in the days of text-based MUDs (Multi-User "Dungeons" - sort of chat
rooms in a virtual fantasy world), I had a friend, heavilly into the SW
development aspects, who put together a MUD where the "top" portion WAS his
real home.  It was a very ... odd experience "wandering around" there.  (And
they took their idea and went and made Placeware.com, hopefully making a
reasonable fortune and probably taking all the fun out of MUDs...)

BillW

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'[EE]: A new world opens up...'
2003\05\01@010028 by Picdude
flavicon
face
On Tuesday 29 April 2003 03:59, Alan B. Pearce scribbled:
> >The thing I really want to try next is using thinner
> >solder.  I was using  .032, but can find solder less
> >than half that diameter.
>
> You will find that using the correct diameter solder is the biggest step to
> making neat looking hand soldered SMD joints. Go for it, it is great fun.


Did this today, using .022 solder (silver) instead of the regular .032 rosin stuff I normally use.  Made a major improvement!  This SOIC stuff is looking very very promising.

Cheers,
-Neil.

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2003\05\01@122411 by Dwayne Reid

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At 03:53 PM 4/30/03 +1200, Jinx wrote:
> > Probably people who use their full real names are a bit more
> > reticent to put additional details out there for possible abuse.
>
>I've no strong feelings either way wrt to photos, but my name is
>part of my domain and I wouldn't say it's created any problems.
>Unless I had a good reason to (eg for sales) I wouldn't put a
>physical address on a page. But only because it's unnecessary,
>not because I want to avoid anything. A PO Box for would be
>OK but even that gives the impression of trying to stay unseen
>or elusive. Maybe that's just me - I would try not to deal with
>anyone who has just a PO Box address

I'll go one further: I won't purchase from a website where the owner hides
their identify.  If I don't see a real human's name and an address, I
*won't* give them my credit card number.

There are some sites selling some neat stuff.  But if I can't find a
contact name, mailing address, phone number, etc on the site, they don't
get my business.

dwayne

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Dwayne Reid   <RemoveMEdwaynerspamTakeThisOuTplanet.eon.net>
Trinity Electronics Systems Ltd    Edmonton, AB, CANADA
(780) 489-3199 voice          (780) 487-6397 fax

Celebrating 19 years of Engineering Innovation (1984 - 2003)
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2003\05\01@125328 by Wagner Lipnharski

flavicon
face
Picdude wrote:
> On Tuesday 29 April 2003 03:59, Alan B. Pearce scribbled:
>>> The thing I really want to try next is using thinner
>>> solder.  I was using  .032, but can find solder less
>>> than half that diameter.
>>
>> You will find that using the correct diameter solder is the biggest
>> step to making neat looking hand soldered SMD joints. Go for it, it
>> is great fun.
>
>
> Did this today, using .022 solder (silver) instead of the regular
> .032 rosin stuff I normally use.  Made a major improvement!  This
> SOIC stuff is looking very very promising.
>
> Cheers,
> -Neil.


Can you post the (0.022) solder part/number or code, manufacturer?

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2003\05\01@131200 by Picdude

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Radio Shack.  It's called "Silver Bearing Solder ....   .022".  It still is a rosin-flux solder.  Comes in a small roll for $4 IIRC.  I'll check the number as soon as I can get my butt off this seat.

Cheers,
-Neil.



On Thursday 01 May 2003 11:51, Wagner Lipnharski scribbled:
>
> Can you post the (0.022) solder part/number or code, manufacturer?

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2003\05\01@132144 by Mike Harrison

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The silver stuff (usually 2% silver, 63% tin) is highly recommented for all SM stuff - it has a
lower melting point and doesn't leech out the silver from the pads of chip R's and C's.
I also find it produces much brighter joints for general soldering, and use it for almost all
soldering.
On Thu, 1 May 2003 12:09:39 -0500, you wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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2003\05\01@132547 by Charles Craft

picon face
Other than cost, is there any downside to using silver solder for everything?


-------Original Message-------
From: Mike Harrison <RemoveMEmikeTakeThisOuTspamspamWHITEWING.CO.UK>
Sent: 05/01/03 12:16 PM
To: EraseMEPICLISTspamspamspamBeGoneMITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: Re: [EE]:  A new world opens up...

>
> The silver stuff (usually 2% silver, 63% tin) is highly recommented for all
SM stuff - it has a
lower melting point and doesn't leech out the silver from the pads of chip
R's and C's.
I also find it produces much brighter joints for general soldering, and
use it for almost all
soldering.

On Thu, 1 May 2003 12:09:39 -0500, you wrote:

>Radio Shack.  It's called "Silver Bearing Solder ....   .022".  It still
is a
>rosin-flux solder.  Comes in a small roll for $4 IIRC.  I'll check the
number
{Quote hidden}

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2003\05\01@133001 by Picdude

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face
On Thursday 01 May 2003 11:23, Dwayne Reid scribbled:
> I'll go one further: I won't purchase from a website where the owner hides
> their identify.  If I don't see a real human's name and an address, I
> *won't* give them my credit card number.
>
> There are some sites selling some neat stuff.  But if I can't find a
> contact name, mailing address, phone number, etc on the site, they don't
> get my business.
>
> dwayne

I don't buy either unless there's a phone number, but many businesses won't put the owner's name on there, especially larger companies.  Look at companies like Amazon.com, Digikey, etc.  You won't get a human's name on those, but people are reachable.

Cheers,
-Neil.

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2003\05\01@133006 by Wagner Lipnharski

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Charles Craft wrote:
> Other than cost, is there any downside to using silver solder for
> everything?

the need to use sunglasses more often due the extra shinning?  :)

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2003\05\01@165943 by Picdude

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face
Here ya go ... Radio Shack part # 64-013E.

Cheers,
-Neil.


On Thursday 01 May 2003 12:09, Picdude scribbled:
> Radio Shack.  It's called "Silver Bearing Solder ....   .022".  It still is
> a rosin-flux solder.  Comes in a small roll for $4 IIRC.  I'll check the
> number as soon as I can get my butt off this seat.
>
> Cheers,
> -Neil.
>
> On Thursday 01 May 2003 11:51, Wagner Lipnharski scribbled:
> > Can you post the (0.022) solder part/number or code, manufacturer?

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2003\05\01@172522 by Marc Nicholas

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Or you could try the "slap the chip on the pads and cover with epoxy" trick
;-)

-marc

On 1/5/03 00:54, "Picdude" <@spam@picdude@spam@spamspam_OUTNARWANI.ORG> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

--------------------------------------------------
Marc Nicholas Geekythings Inc. C/416.543.4896
UNIX, Database, Security and Networking Consulting

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'[OT] OPENSUSE 10.0 - Need to add mp3 and other pac'
2005\12\29@024504 by Vis Naicker
flavicon
face
part 1 928 bytes content-type:text/plain; (decoded 7bit)

Hi. I want to add the missing packages for OPENSUSE 10.0 and I don't
have internet access let alone broadband @ home. I need the mp3, mpg ,
mpeg2, mp4 , and apparently java (!) . I have browsed around and have so
far only found sites that hold full directories of rpms , sources , and
etc.

If anyone have any idea of the exact rpms I need to download, (and then
add to as Yasts installation source on the HD), please mail me a link or
the list.

I am reaching the cap on the internet soon, so I need to be selective
and can't get any iso's till next year. I do have debian sarge iso dvd's
as well as FC4 x 4 cd's ( FC4 sucks 4 me period ). I tried SUSE 9.0 as
installation source but gave up when I had dependency problems.

Vis Naicker

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part 2 35 bytes content-type:text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
(decoded 7bit)

2005\12\29@094605 by John Ferrell

face picon face
part 1 1653 bytes content-type:text/plain; format=flowed; charset="windows-1250"; (decoded 7bit)

You can buy the full 5 CD Suse 10 set from an Amazon.com vendor for about
$13. I fear if you try to get the pieces one at a time you will always be
one short.
I will be a Linux Rookie for a long time but I am betting Suse will show the
way to escape Microsoft.

John Ferrell
http://DixieNC.US

{Original Message removed}

2005\12\29@113131 by Danny Sauer

flavicon
face
John wrote regarding 'Re: [OT] OPENSUSE 10.0 - Need to add mp3 and other packages' on Thu, Dec 29 at 08:50:
> You can buy the full 5 CD Suse 10 set from an Amazon.com vendor for about
> $13. I fear if you try to get the pieces one at a time you will always be
> one short.

I'll second this suggestion.  By buying the CDs, you also officially
show some support for further development, and you get some packages
which SuSE can't distribute for free (things like Real Player, etc).
Besides, you'll eventually find somethign else hat you'd like to
install, and if you haev the CDs you don't have to waste your
apparently limited network connectivity. :)

If you insist on Open SUSE, feel free to contact me off-list, and I
can send you a DVD for the cost of postage and media...

--Danny


'[OT] udev rules for openSuse 10.2 for PICkit 2 and'
2007\02\03@103717 by Xiaofan Chen
face picon face
Just wondering if there are some openSuse user here in the list.

I have some problems to get udev rules working under openSuse 10.2.

I am now using the same udev rules like Ubuntu 6.06/6.10 detailed in
piklab.sourceforge.net/wiki/index.php/Port_connection_problems.
The udev/PAM combination does not work under openSuse 10.2 so that
I am using the same udev rules as Ubuntu 6.06/6.10.

mcuee@localhost:/etc/udev/rules.d> groups mcuee
users dialout video microchip
mcuee@localhost:/etc/udev/rules.d> cat /etc/udev/rules.d/026_microchip.rules
#PICKit
SYSFS{idVendor}=="04d8", SYSFS{idProduct}=="0032", MODE="0660",
GROUP="microchip"
#PICKit2
SYSFS{idVendor}=="04d8", SYSFS{idProduct}=="0033", MODE="0660",
GROUP="microchip"
#ICD2
SYSFS{idVendor}=="04d8", SYSFS{idProduct}=="8000", MODE="0660",
GROUP="microchip"
#ICD21
SYSFS{idVendor}=="04d8", SYSFS{idProduct}=="8001", MODE="0660",
GROUP="microchip"

However, the result is not as expected.
mcuee@localhost:/etc/udev/rules.d> lsusb
Bus 003 Device 001: ID 0000:0000
Bus 002 Device 031: ID 04d8:8000 Microchip Technology, Inc. In-Circuit Debugger
Bus 002 Device 030: ID 04d8:0033 Microchip Technology, Inc.
Bus 002 Device 001: ID 0000:0000
Bus 001 Device 001: ID 0000:0000
mcuee@localhost:/etc/udev/rules.d> ls -la /dev/bus/usb/002
total 0
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root           100 2007-02-01 20:46 .
drwxr-xr-x 5 root root           100 2007-02-02 03:43 ..
crw-r--r-- 1 root root      189, 128 2007-02-02 03:43 001
crw-r--r-- 1 root microchip 189, 157 2007-02-01 20:45 030
crw-r--r-- 1 root microchip 189, 158 2007-02-01 20:46 031

Instead of 660, the permission is 644 so a normal user can not run
pk2/pyk with PICkit 2.

2007\02\03@205846 by Tachyon

picon face
I use SuSE.

First, you should try and make these modifications through YaST and not
manually. Unless you disable SuSEconfig (and therefore YaST) most of the
modifications you make manually will be overwritten. You can still make
manual modifications, but if you look, most config files will have
comments listing what external file you should edit to add manual scripts.
Anyway, in YaST check the system options. If you wish to use PAM, make
sure it is enabled and configured.
Next, use the SDB (if you have it installed, otherwise use the newer one
on the website) and search on udev configuration.
I don't believe doing it the 'Ubuntu way' will work.

Anyway, that said, I believe 10.2 uses hotplug, but I'm not positive as
I'm still using 9.3Pro and 10.1 Open.
Check http://en.opensuse.org/SDB:SUSE_Linux_Hotplug_System_Overview

Hope this helps, if not let me know and I'll dig more into my 'grey
archives'.

Xiaofan Chen wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2007\02\04@002544 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On 2/4/07, Tachyon <TakeThisOuTtherealtachyon.....spamTakeThisOuTgmail.com> wrote:
> I use SuSE.

Thanks. This is the first time I am trying out openSuse.

I can not find anything about udev in YaST. I will try harder.

>
> Anyway, that said, I believe 10.2 uses hotplug, but I'm not positive as
> I'm still using 9.3Pro and 10.1 Open.
> Check http://en.opensuse.org/SDB:SUSE_Linux_Hotplug_System_Overview
>

I can not find /etc/hotplug or /etc/sysconfig/hotplug in the system so I
think they are using udev.

Regards,
Xiaofan

2007\02\04@033144 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On 2/4/07, Xiaofan Chen <TakeThisOuTxiaofancKILLspamspamspamgmail.com> wrote:
> I can not find /etc/hotplug or /etc/sysconfig/hotplug in the system so I
> think they are using udev.
>

After a bit of tweaking, I find out the solution. This time Google does not
help though...

The default rules 50-udev-default rules is setting 0644 for the libusb
device. Therefore I have to rename the original
026-microchip.rules to 76-microchip.rules to get 0660 permission.

mcuee@localhost:/etc/udev/rules.d> tail 50-udev-default.rules
...
# libusb device access
SUBSYSTEM=="usb_device", ACTION=="add", PROGRAM="/bin/sh -c 'K=%k;
K=$${K#usbdev}; printf bus/usb/%%03i/%%03i $${K%%%%.*} $${K#*.}'",
NAME="%c", MODE="0644"
...

mcuee@localhost:/etc/udev/rules.d> cat 76_microchip.rules
#PICKit
SYSFS{idVendor}=="04d8", SYSFS{idProduct}=="0032", MODE="0660",
GROUP="microchip"
#PICKit2
SYSFS{idVendor}=="04d8", SYSFS{idProduct}=="0033", MODE="0660",
GROUP="microchip"
#ICD2
SYSFS{idVendor}=="04d8", SYSFS{idProduct}=="8000", MODE="0660",
GROUP="microchip"
#ICD21
SYSFS{idVendor}=="04d8", SYSFS{idProduct}=="8001", MODE="0660",
GROUP="microchip"

mcuee@localhost:/etc/udev/rules.d> ls -la /dev/bus/usb/002
total 0
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root           100 2007-02-04 16:19 .
drwxr-xr-x 5 root root           100 2007-02-04 23:10 ..
crw-r--r-- 1 root root      189, 128 2007-02-04 23:10 001
crw-rw---- 1 root microchip 189, 131 2007-02-04 16:18 004
crw-rw---- 1 root microchip 189, 132 2007-02-04 16:20 005

By the way, it seems to me that there are no YaST modules which
are taking care of this. And there is not pam-console modules so that
the Fedora Core 5/6 way is not working.

Regards,
Xiaofan


'[PIC]/[EE] Favourite free/OpenSource PIC programmi'
2007\08\10@040131 by Matthew Rhys-Roberts
flavicon
face
Just interested to know what free/OSS packages people here may like to
use, for PIC coding and board design.

I had made some inroads into JALss as a PIC coding environment, and have
almost finished my own programmer, but what else out there rocks?

Best regards,
Matt

2007\08\10@041909 by Zik Saleeba

face picon face
I like SDCC, the free C compiler for PIC (and other platforms). In
fact I like it enough that I now contribute to it.

Cheers,
Zik

On 8/10/07, Matthew Rhys-Roberts <.....mattspamRemoveMEnu-ins.com> wrote:
> Just interested to know what free/OSS packages people here may like to
> use, for PIC coding and board design.
>
> I had made some inroads into JALss as a PIC coding environment, and have
> almost finished my own programmer, but what else out there rocks?
>
> Best regards,
> Matt
> -

2007\08\10@044159 by Mark Rages

face picon face
On 8/10/07, Matthew Rhys-Roberts <RemoveMEmattspamspamBeGonenu-ins.com> wrote:
> Just interested to know what free/OSS packages people here may like to
> use, for PIC coding and board design.
>
> I had made some inroads into JALss as a PIC coding environment, and have
> almost finished my own programmer, but what else out there rocks?
>

Assembler: gpasm
Compiler: SDCC
IDE: emacs, GNU make
Schematic capture: gschem
Layout: pcb

This is a remarkably productive toolset once you learn it.

Regards,
Mark
markrages@gmail
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Midwest Telecine LLC
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2007\08\10@084154 by David Novak

picon face
Kicad is excellent for PCB design!

http://www.lis.inpg.fr/realise_au_lis/kicad/

http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/kicad-users/



> {Original Message removed}

2007\08\10@104547 by Hector Martin

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face
Same toolset here, except for the IDE. I use piklab. Great IDE for PIC use!

--
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Public Key: http://www.marcansoft.com/marcan.asc

2007\08\10@141636 by stef mientki

flavicon
face
Matthew Rhys-Roberts wrote:
> Just interested to know what free/OSS packages people here may like to
> use, for PIC coding and board design.
>
> I had made some inroads into JALss as a PIC coding environment, and have
> almost finished my own programmer, but what else out there rocks?
>
> Best regards,
> Matt
>  
you probably mean JALcc ?
JALss is declared dead and will soon be replaced by JALsPy,
a free / open source JAL (analog / digital / virtual) simulator written
in Python,
with import of Eagle schematics.
JAL, and specially Bert's starters package
 members.home.nl/b.vandam/lonely/index.html
might be a good choice.

cheers,
Stef

2007\08\19@093020 by wouter van ooijen

face picon face
> > Just interested to know what free/OSS packages people here
> may like to
> > use, for PIC coding and board design.

schematic/pcb: eagle free version, but recently I bought a larger
license
PC side programming: python!
PIC C: C18 is not free, but costs $0...

(ARM: GCC, GDB/Insight)

Wouter van Ooijen

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'[OT] OpenSolaris Project Indiana First Developer P'
2007\11\04@182612 by Xiaofan Chen
face picon face
www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=899
http://dlc.sun.com/osol/indiana/downloads/20071031/

With the Debian founder Ian Murdock on board, Project Indiana
will be able to learn from Debian and Ubuntu (Mr Murdock also
found Progeny Linux which tried to commercialized Debian but failed).

I have not downloaded this but I think I will try it with the livecd.
Not so sure if it needs a primary partition (I do not have a spare
one) like FreeBSD.

Xiaofan

2007\11\05@085755 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On 11/5/07, Xiaofan Chen <xiaofancEraseMEspamgmail.com> wrote:
> www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=899
> http://dlc.sun.com/osol/indiana/downloads/20071031/
>
> With the Debian founder Ian Murdock on board, Project Indiana
> will be able to learn from Debian and Ubuntu (Mr Murdock also
> found Progeny Linux which tried to commercialized Debian but failed).
>
> I have not downloaded this but I think I will try it with the livecd.
> Not so sure if it needs a primary partition (I do not have a spare
> one) like FreeBSD.
>

I actually tried it with VMplayer under Windows. The livecd
works and I can actually browse the Internet within the
Gnome LiveCD session. Then I tried to install it to the virtual
HDD, it took less than 20 minutes to install (I took a shower).
However I have not figure how to enable the network yet.
Interestingly it complained about PICkit 2 since PICKit 2 has
dual USB configurations ( a legacy due to the fact that the
first PICKit 1 test application is developed in Mac).

Xiaofan

2007\11\05@091037 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On 11/5/07, Xiaofan Chen <RemoveMExiaofancEraseMEspamspam_OUTgmail.com> wrote:
> > http://dlc.sun.com/osol/indiana/downloads/20071031/
>
> I actually tried it with VMplayer under Windows. The livecd
> works and I can actually browse the Internet within the
> Gnome LiveCD session. Then I tried to install it to the virtual
> HDD, it took less than 20 minutes to install (I took a shower).
> However I have not figure how to enable the network yet.

Google helps me again to find this:
http://defect.opensolaris.org/bz/show_bug.cgi?id=66

Now I need to learn more about VMWare Player...


Xiaofan


'[OT] TLS/OpenSSL network client'
2012\11\13@051709 by V G
picon face
Hi all, I'm doing some work with TLS over TCP, and I'm going to be using
OpenSSL. I have a few questions about how this works:

I'm familiar with the concept of asymmetric key cryptography and how
OpenPGP works - each person has a public and private key, you encrypt data
using the target's public key, then the target can decrypt it only with his
private key. As far as I know, OpenSSL is also based on asymmetric key
cryptography, and generally uses RSA. I understand that one can also use it
in a similar way with public and private keys.

Q1: I don't understand what "certificates" are and how they come into play
here. What are certificates and certificate files? How does the certificate
compare to a public/private key?

Q2: Executing `openssl genrsa -out mykey.pem 4096` generates an RSA private
key. Then executing `openssl rsa -in mykey.pem -pubout >mykey.pub`
"extracts" the public key from it. What is it actually doing when it's
"extracting"?

Q3: Generally, when setting up a network server of any kind that makes use
of TLS or OpenSSL, one must have the certificate and "key" already
prepared. However, when a client connects, how does it encrypt the data to
send to the server? Does it generate keys on the fly prior to connecting? I
don't understand how this process works

2012\11\13@064048 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
V G wrote:

> Hi all, I'm doing some work with TLS over TCP, and I'm going to be
> using OpenSSL. I have a few questions about how this works:
>
> I'm familiar with the concept of asymmetric key cryptography and how
> OpenPGP works - each person has a public and private key, you encrypt
> data using the target's public key, then the target can decrypt it
> only with his private key. As far as I know, OpenSSL is also based on
> asymmetric key cryptography, and generally uses RSA. I understand
> that one can also use it in a similar way with public and private
> keys.
>
> Q1: I don't understand what "certificates" are and how they come into
> play here. What are certificates and certificate files? How does the
> certificate compare to a public/private key?

Essentially, a certificate is something that binds a public key to an
identity (and some other information, like an expiration date and the
purpose of the cert). Wikipedia is your friend -- the "Public key
certificate" article lays out the principle.
> Q2: Executing `openssl genrsa -out mykey.pem 4096` generates an RSA
> private key. Then executing `openssl rsa -in mykey.pem -pubout
> >mykey.pub` "extracts" the public key from it. What is it actually
> doing when it's "extracting"?

It's not exactly extracting, but generating a public key that matches
your private key. (It is easy to create a public key from a private key,
but not the other way round.) Usually the public key is used to encrypt
a message, which then can only be decrypted with the associated private
key. In case you need general info about public-key cryptography,
Wikipedia is your friend -- see "Public-key cryptography" :)

> Q3: Generally, when setting up a network server of any kind that makes
> use of TLS or OpenSSL, one must have the certificate and "key"
> already prepared. However, when a client connects, how does it
> encrypt the data to send to the server? Does it generate keys on the
> fly prior to connecting? I don't understand how this process works.

Part of the protocol is to generate a 'secret' specific to the session
on the fly. Wikipedia is your friend; the article about "Transport Layer
Security" (that's what TLS means) explains the fundamentals of the
protocol. Certificates and public-key cryptography are essential
elements of it.

Gerhar

2012\11\13@132107 by veegee

flavicon
face
Gerhard Fiedler wrote:
> Essentially, a certificate is something that binds a public key to an
> identity (and some other information, like an expiration date and the
> purpose of the cert). Wikipedia is your friend -- the "Public key
> certificate" article lays out the principle.
>
> It's not exactly extracting, but generating a public key that matches
> your private key. (It is easy to create a public key from a private key,
> but not the other way round.) Usually the public key is used to encrypt
> a message, which then can only be decrypted with the associated private
> key. In case you need general info about public-key cryptography,
> Wikipedia is your friend -- see "Public-key cryptography" :)
>
> Part of the protocol is to generate a 'secret' specific to the session
> on the fly. Wikipedia is your friend; the article about "Transport Layer
> Security" (that's what TLS means) explains the fundamentals of the
> protocol. Certificates and public-key cryptography are essential
> elements of it.

Thanks so much for your reply, Mr. Fiedler. That cleared it up.

Just a general note though: I'm sure everyone is aware of the existence of
Wikipedia and search engines and manuals and datasheets. But if everyone were to
be forced to use those things alone, things like the PICLIST would have no
purpose or place. I can assure you that I, and most other people who take the
time to ask questions have done at least some initial reading and searching.. But
I post certain questions here because I think I can get a far better and more
efficient answers than sites returned by a search engine. In addition, it takes
five minutes for me to ask a question, and five minutes for someone to post a
reply. Had I instead resorted to using the other methods only, it would have
taken many times the total man-hours, and with poorer results. I can assure you,
one does not need constant reminders that Wikipedia is available!

- V

2012\11\13@161824 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
veegee wrote:

{Quote hidden}

I pointed you to very specific pages, that answer very specifically your
questions. The questions had a (potential) scope that goes way beyond a
piclist answer, so I don't really know what your problem is with these
pointers.

> But I post certain questions here because I think I can get a far
> better and more efficient answers than sites returned by a search
> engine. In addition, it takes five minutes for me to ask a question,
> and five minutes for someone to post a reply.
Which I did. Besides the pointers to very specific Wikipedia pages I
also posted some initial information. Again, what's your problem? If I
hadn't wanted to answer your questions, I wouldn't have answered them.
So I spent five minutes to post a reply. And you have a problem with
what you say you wanted? Didn't you get what you wanted?

> Had I instead resorted to using the other methods only, it would have
> taken many times the total man-hours, and with poorer results. I can
> assure you, one does not need constant reminders that Wikipedia is
> available!
You may not need them, but what's the problem with stating "Wikipedia is
your friend"? Is this offensive? Is there a problem with reminding the
reader what a fantastic accomplishment Wikipedia is? Instead of writing
stuff over and over again, we now can point to publicly available pages
where sometimes astonishingly good information is freely available to
the public. Is Wikipedia not your friend? Are you not (sometimes at
least) in awe about this?

I didn't write "you should have searched Wikipedia before posting here"
(or one of the less polite versions of this that sometimes are written).
If you read that, read again.

Gerhar


'[OT] Techshop opens in Chandler'
2013\11\12@102224 by Harrison Cooper
flavicon
face
Looks like Microchip has a new neighbor:

http://www.bizjournals.com/sanjose/news/2013/11/11/techshop-opens-new-arizona-location.html?ana=e_du_pub&s=article_du&ed=2013-11-11


I know we have a few members down in the area, might be interesting if we had some experience feedback if they ever get into it?

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2013\11\12@231134 by Justin Richards

face picon face
I like that.


http://www.bizjournals.com/sanjose/news/2013/11/11/techshop-opens-new-arizona-location.html?ana=e_du_pub&s=article_du&ed=2013-11-11
>
>
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