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'eprom eraser'
1998\05\05@114833 by Vincent Chan

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hi,
       do you guys know where can I find cheap eprom eraser.  So far, the
cheapest one I found is Datarase II from JDR.  It is about $40.  Any
cheaper one?  I don't care of those fancy features.

bye.

1998\05\05@130627 by Andres j Ogayar

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face
-----Mensaje original-----
De: Vincent Chan <spam_OUTvkchanTakeThisOuTspamIENG9.UCSD.EDU>
Para: .....PICLISTKILLspamspam@spam@MITVMA.MIT.EDU <PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Fecha: martes 5 de mayo de 1998 17:48
Asunto: eprom eraser


>hi,
>        do you guys know where can I find cheap eprom eraser.  So far, the
>cheapest one I found is Datarase II from JDR.  It is about $40.  Any
>cheaper one?  I don't care of those fancy features.
>
   Why you just buy one of those cheap U-V fluorescent lamps and mount it
feeded by AC mains with a manual switch?

   You can build one for less than $20 for sure.

Andres j.
>bye.

1998\05\05@195230 by Scott A. Woods

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face
Andres,

There was a description of a mechanism to make such, out of one of the portable
flourescent units sold by place like radio shack, by using a UV bulb instead.  O
ne MAJOR
problem is that, as I recall, you need to shield the unit since the UV that eras
es eproms
also wreaks havoc with eyes...

My brother built such a unit & put it in a wood enclosure as I recall.

Commercial units ALSO have an interlock to turn the bulb off if the unit is open
ed...
saving $20 is not worth losing your eyesight...

Scott Woods

----------
{Quote hidden}

1998\05\05@202254 by Rob Symmans

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picon face
Buy a UV tube from lamp supply company and fit it to a cheap battery
operated mini flourescent lamp. Cost me around $15 Australian. I run it off
a plug pack and it works well.
rob



At 06:00 PM 5/5/98 +0200, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

-----------------------------------
Rob Symmans

Lions Eye Institute
Lasers and BioEngineering
2 Verdun Street
Nedlands 6009
Western Australia
Tel 08 9381 0754   Fax 08 9381 0700
-----------------------------------

1998\05\06@021615 by Leon Heller

flavicon
picon face
In message <RemoveME3.0.5.32.19980505084246.007c9cc0spamTakeThisOuTieng9.ucsd.edu>, Vincent
Chan <vkchanEraseMEspam.....IENG9.UCSD.EDU> writes
>hi,
>        do you guys know where can I find cheap eprom eraser.  So far, the
>cheapest one I found is Datarase II from JDR.  It is about $40.  Any
>cheaper one?  I don't care of those fancy features.
>
>bye.

Make your own, it's very easy. Just substitute a UV tube for the tube in
a standard fluorescent fitting. Use two with suitable tubes for PCB
exposure.

Leon
--
Leon Heller: EraseMEleonspamlfheller.demon.co.uk http://www.lfheller.demon.co.uk
Amateur Radio Callsign G1HSM    Tel: +44 (0) 118 947 1424
See http://www.lfheller.demon.co.uk/dds.htm for details of my AD9850
DDS system. See " "/diy_dsp.htm for a simple DIY DSP ADSP-2104 system.

1998\05\06@044523 by Andres j Ogayar

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-----Mensaje original-----
De: Scott A. Woods <RemoveMEsawoodsEraseMEspamEraseMEGENEVAONLINE.COM>
Para: RemoveMEPICLISTspam_OUTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU <RemoveMEPICLISTTakeThisOuTspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Fecha: miircoles 6 de mayo de 1998 1:52
Asunto: Re: eprom eraser


>Andres,
>
>There was a description of a mechanism to make such, out of one of the
portable
>flourescent units sold by place like radio shack, by using a UV bulb
instead.  One MAJOR
>problem is that, as I recall, you need to shield the unit since the UV that
erases eproms
>also wreaks havoc with eyes...
>
Scott,

   For sure! I just assumed that who handles UV lamps _does_ know what is
doing and that direct eye exposure could cause harm.

   Anyway, it is not so difficult shielding it -use a screen like those
used in banks for validating notes, or something similar; maybe a switch and
a closed box can do the job.

   Apologies,

   Andres j.

1998\05\06@071915 by Bryson, William G (Bill)

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I've had a Dataerase II for 5 years and it still works like a champ.  It is
pretty inexpensive, safe, well designed and reliable...

-------------------------------------------------
Work all day & night,
deliver on time & on budget,       Regards,
and justice for all...             Bill Bryson


> {Original Message removed}

1998\05\08@103015 by Tom Handley

picon face
  Vincent, I recommend the Datarase II. It's as cheap as its gets for a
commercial eraser and it's very reliable. Considering that PIC `windowed'
(/JW) parts cost around $20 and a $40 eraser that will last for years and
supports up to 4 DIP devices of any size, it seems to me to be a good
investment.

  I'm sure you will get a lot of feedback about `home-brew' erasers that
range from UV tubes to X-Rays to leaving them out in the sun (gawd, I actually
tried that with a 1702 in the 70's...) and nuclear explosions ;-)

  When you consider your time, the cost of the materials, and the very
serious hazard to your eyes if not constructed properly, I think a savings
of maybe $10 is not worth it...

  - Tom

At 08:42 AM 5/5/98 -0700, you wrote:
>hi,
>        do you guys know where can I find cheap eprom eraser.  So far, the
>cheapest one I found is Datarase II from JDR.  It is about $40.  Any
>cheaper one?  I don't care of those fancy features.
>
>bye.
>
>


'eprom eraser'
1998\06\27@185851 by John de Stigter
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face
> Buy a UV tube from lamp supply company and fit it to a cheap battery
> operated mini flourescent lamp. Cost me around $15 Australian. I run it
off
> a plug pack and it works well.
> rob

Rob,
Could you give me the name of a lamp supply company and/or a make/model for
the tube. All I've been able to find is a fluorescent tube with a UV
coating, which isn't suitable.Even though Jaycar has eprom erasers on
special this month,they are still over $100.
Regards,
John.

1998\06\29@200013 by Louis Marquette

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jkl components corporation makes cold cathode fluorescent lamps in narrow
spectrum ultraviolet
Mouser electronics (800-344-4539) distributes for them

John de Stigter wrote:

{Quote hidden}

1998\06\30@110141 by ephen Rothlisberger

picon face
>John de Stigter wrote:
>
>> > Buy a UV tube from lamp supply company and fit it to a cheap battery
>> > operated mini flourescent lamp. Cost me around $15 Australian. I run it
>> off
>> > a plug pack and it works well.
>> > rob
>>
>> Rob,
>> Could you give me the name of a lamp supply company and/or a make/model for
>> the tube. All I've been able to find is a fluorescent tube with a UV
>> coating, which isn't suitable.Even though Jaycar has eprom erasers on
>> special this month,they are still over $100.
>> Regards,
>> John.

Be aware that to erase EPROMs you need to use UV-B at 253.7 nm. The "Black
Light" UV tubes used for entertainment (sunbeds, nightclubs, etc) are UV-A
and don't work. I bought some UV-B tubes at my local electrical wholesaler.
Ask for germicidal lamps. Hospitals use them for disinfecting. A 40W tube
cost me about $12. The only disadvantage is that in this form it's quite
large, more the size of an office flourescent. Then you have to buy a
ballast, a starter and the fittings, but it still works out really cheap,
albeit bulky.

As well as UV (which you can't see), these tubes put out a visible purple
light.

Warning! The invisible UV is dangerous radiation that will harm you without
you realising it! Running an exposed UV-B lamp is always bad for you.

Stephen.

1998\06\30@133535 by Roland Andrag

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> Rob,
> Could you give me the name of a lamp supply company and/or a make/model for
> the tube. All I've been able to find is a fluorescent tube with a UV
> coating, which isn't suitable.Even though Jaycar has eprom erasers on
> special this month,they are still over $100.
> Regards,
> John.

Hello John

I can't give a a name, except to tell you that a I made a home eraser
uring a "germicidal" bulb. These are shortwave UV flourescent bulbes
used in hospitals to disinfect utensils etc. The bulb erases a
PIC16C71 in 1-2 mins, a PIC17C44 in ~15 mins.  If memory serves be
correctly the bulb is of the "G8T5" type - 5 Watts, but I don't know
what the G8 stands for.

I have seen the same bulb specified as a replacement for a commercial
eraser (check your RS catalogue).  Of course if you don't have a
desklamp or something to plug the bulb into you will have to buy
fittings, a ballast and a starter as well. I did this (thus built my
eraser from scratch... cost: R100=$17 more or less). Any more questions are welc
ome.

Hope that helps
 Roland

1998\06\30@144929 by Don

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Roland Andrag wrote:

{Quote hidden}

lcome.
>
> Hope that helps
>   Roland

I am trying to find a lamp also. By the way, the G stands for germicidal. I thi
nk the 8
is the length in inches.The only track I can find on these locally is from a lam
p supply
company. They want about $20 for the small lamps. They are all abt same price un
till
they get over 12 inches. I saw a post this morning mentioning a much lower price
than
this for a 40 watt unit, which would be fine. I wonder if it was purchased many
years
ago or if there is a  source of reasonable lamps. The problem may be due to low
production volume ( or maybe just rippoff?). The lamps actually should be cheape
r to
manufacture, since they are the same old f type fluorescent minus the phosphor c
oating
inside the tube ! If everybody needed them, they would probably be $2 at a hardw
are
store.
Don

1998\06\30@181803 by ephen Rothlisberger

picon face
>Don wrote:
> I am trying to find a lamp also. By the way, the G stands for germicidal.
I think the 8
>is the length in inches.The only track I can find on these locally is from
a lamp supply
>company. They want about $20 for the small lamps. They are all abt same
price untill
>they get over 12 inches. I saw a post this morning mentioning a much lower
price than
>this for a 40 watt unit, which would be fine. I wonder if it was purchased
many years
>ago or if there is a  source of reasonable lamps. The problem may be due
to low
>production volume ( or maybe just rippoff?). The lamps actually should be
cheaper to
>manufacture, since they are the same old f type fluorescent minus the
phosphor coating
>inside the tube ! If everybody needed them, they would probably be $2 at a
hardware
>store.

There is an ongoing demand for germicidal lamps, so the supply isn't likely
to dry up.

Incidentally, the UV lamps are made of quartz, while standard visible
flourescents are made of glass. Glass won't pass UV-B, hence the quartz.
This makes the UV lamps more expensive and also more fragile.

Stephen.

1998\06\30@184600 by Eric Naus

picon face
Hi,

You can also make one from a GE G4S11 incadescent UV lamp in series with a
40 W standard bulb

that acts as a ballest. Shouldn't cost more than $4.00.

Do not stare into the UV Bulb.

Can be bought at most places that sell freezers.

I've the same bulb since the 2708 came out, for those that rember that far
back.

Bye for now


'eprom eraser'
1998\07\01@085751 by
flavicon
face
> Be aware that to erase EPROMs you need to use UV-B at 253.7 nm. The "Black
> Light" UV tubes used for entertainment (sunbeds, nightclubs, etc) are UV-A
> and don't work. I bought some UV-B tubes at my local electrical
> wholesaler.
> Ask for germicidal lamps. Hospitals use them for disinfecting. A 40W tube
> cost me about $12. The only disadvantage is that in this form it's quite
> large, more the size of an office flourescent. Then you have to buy a
> ballast, a starter and the fittings, but it still works out really cheap,
> albeit bulky.
>
> As well as UV (which you can't see), these tubes put out a visible purple
> light.
>
> Warning! The invisible UV is dangerous radiation that will harm you
> without
> you realising it! Running an exposed UV-B lamp is always bad for you.
>
> Stephen.
>
Well, many years back I bought old sun lamp from a garage sale.  It was a
very small device intended for tanning faces, it also had an infra red
heater in it which was controled separately.  That thing used to erase a
27128 in about 30 minutes.  Not exactly speedy, but it cost virtually
nothing.  I guess the lamps in these things must put out some UV-B as well
as UV-A.

Mike Rigby-Jones

1998\07\01@103352 by Andrius Tamulis

picon face
> Hi,

> You can also make one from a GE G4S11 incadescent UV lamp

> Can be bought at most places that sell freezers.

I have to ask: freezers? perhaps the way to erase the PIC is to put it in
the ice-cube tray overnight?

Andrius

1998\07\01@120118 by Eric Naus

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part 0 1079 bytes
<META content=text/html;charset=iso-8859-1 http-equiv=Content-Type>
<META content='"MSHTML 4.72.2106.6"' name=GENERATOR>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT color=#000000 size=2>Yes Freezer suppliers.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#000000 size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#000000 size=2>It's a germicidal lamp, it kills certain types
of bacteria. Also used for killing bacteria in bottled water.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#000000 size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#000000 size=2>Now you know the rest of the story.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#000000 size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#000000 size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#000000 size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=#000000 size=2>Eric</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>

</x-html>

1998\07\01@130509 by arvidj

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Andrius said:

> I have to ask: freezers? perhaps the way to erase the PIC is to put it in
> the ice-cube tray overnight?

Which begs the [OT] question: Does the UV light stay on when the door
is closed?

Arvid

1998\07\01@155506 by Timothy D. Gray

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I have yet to see a freezer that has a UV light in it... What model or
brand?

On Wed, 1 Jul 1998, Arvid Jedlicka wrote:

{Quote hidden}

1998\07\02@015843 by paulb

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Stephen Rothlisberger wrote:

>> I am trying to find a lamp also. By the way, the G stands for
>> germicidal.

 Indeed.  There are two grades, one has a filter (coating), the other
not.  You must have the un-filtered one.  I have a nasty suspicion that
inappropriate use of the filtered ones explains the people who complain
that their eraser has become impotent *even though the lamp still lights
up the same*.  The mercury vapour *cannot* "wear out" and produce less
UV radiation.  A filter however may become more effective at blocking
the short wavelengths as it ages and is chemically changed by the UV.
The only other factor could be plating of the inside of the tube with
cathode material.

 It is a bit PICky, but of course, these tubes are by definition *not*
"fluorescent", even if it is convenient to so describe their format.

>>  They want about $20 for the small lamps. They are all about same
>> price until they get over 12 inches.  I saw a post this morning
>> mentioning a much lower price than this for a 40 watt unit, which
>> would be fine.

 Have you not noticed that *all* small fluorescent (and this time, I do
mean that) tubes cost at *least* double that of a 40W one?  It does
relate to volume.  In commercial use, they use the *big* tubes of
course.

> There is an ongoing demand for germicidal lamps, so the supply isn't
> likely to dry up.

 They are indeed a big seller, but nowhere near domestic ones.

> Incidentally, the UV lamps are made of quartz,
...
> This makes the UV lamps more expensive and also more fragile.

 Mmm, I'm not at all sure about the latter!

 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1998\07\02@115617 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
On Thu, 2 Jul 1998, Paul B. Webster VK2BZC wrote:

> Stephen Rothlisberger wrote:
>
> >> I am trying to find a lamp also. By the way, the G stands for
> >> germicidal.
>
>   Indeed.  There are two grades, one has a filter (coating), the other
> not.  You must have the un-filtered one.  I have a nasty suspicion that
> inappropriate use of the filtered ones explains the people who complain
> that their eraser has become impotent *even though the lamp still lights
> up the same*.

The lamps that you want are usually marked UV-C (there are 3 kinds of
UV, classified: A, B and C).

> The mercury vapour *cannot* "wear out" and produce less
> UV radiation.

In my experience, this is wrong. Mercury vapor lamps are very peculiar
devices, although they seem to be simple. Mercury plasma radiates at 3 or
more wavelengths, two of which are UV, and the third is visible (blue).
The trick is to get the pressure, temperature and additives (Argon gas)
just right to make the lamp work in the desired mode. Any old tubes will
have increased pressure and thus emission on the shortest wavelength
(which is the best for EPROMs) decreases. Phophors used to convert the UV
into visible in fluorescent lamps do not care too much about this shift,
but I happen to have glasses that turn dark in the sun, and I've noticed
that my PL desk lamp turns them slightly dark after I've changed the bulb
(for the same type, Philips PL). The old lamp definitely does not affect
the glasses, and it's the same type (the glasses turn dark when exposed
to certain UV wavelengths), but weaker (older), and also seems to give
out less blue light. Since the phosphor does not give UV, that leaves the
incresed pressure in the lamp filling as the only possible culprit...

I've also played around quite a bit with mercury vapor lamps, and for
example, the high pressure mercury vapor lamps (as used in street
lighting, but sans enevelope and fluorescent coating), expose photo resist
quite well, but are lousy at EPROM erasure, even at violent power levels
(2500 Watts at 30 cm). High temperature and pressure broadens the spectrum
and decreases the radiation at short wavelengths. On the contrary, the
same lamp connected to a 6 Watt fluorescent circuit (w/o starter), did
glow the usual pale blue and erased an EPROM in slightly more than an hour
- at a power input of about 1.5 W.

> A filter however may become more effective at blocking
> the short wavelengths as it ages and is chemically changed by the UV.

The filter usually takes one magnitude more time to change than the
electrodes and the pressure in the tube. It's the old story of the moving
parts vs. the chassis in the reliability contest ;)

> The only other factor could be plating of the inside of the tube with
> cathode material.

Yes, this one finishes the lamps, but some can be recovered by baking in
an oven at 400 degrees (don't do this at home, it requires a special oven
with temperature gradient control - however, if you happen to have an
oven made for glassware conditioning before evacuation then do it ;).

> >>  They want about $20 for the small lamps. They are all about same
> >> price until they get over 12 inches.  I saw a post this morning
> >> mentioning a much lower price than this for a 40 watt unit, which
> >> would be fine.
>
>   Have you not noticed that *all* small fluorescent (and this time, I do
> mean that) tubes cost at *least* double that of a 40W one?  It does
> relate to volume.  In commercial use, they use the *big* tubes of
> course.

I can't say that. In this country emergency lights (of the kind that
charges from the power line and then provides light for 1-2 hours from
small fluorescent tubes) are mandatory in every house for certain reasons,
and the tubes that go in these are the exact same size as those in EPROM
erasers. They do not cost more than 40 Watt lamps (same manufacturer,
usually Philips or Osram, also others).

So it's just the old laws of supply and demand...

Incidentally I've just bought a Philips UV-C lamp, 6 Watts, from the
importer, for about $15. This includes VAT, taxes and whatnot.

> > Incidentally, the UV lamps are made of quartz,
> ...
> > This makes the UV lamps more expensive and also more fragile.
>
>   Mmm, I'm not at all sure about the latter!

I'd like to add to this that high pressure mercury vapor lamp bodies are
almost indestructible ;) (I weigh over 100 kg and I happen to have stepped
on an old one once by mistake - nothing happened. I tried a hammer after
wrapping it in cloth, and it was *hard* to get it done in - much harder
than other apparatus that needs to be vented before disposal - don't try
this at home either).

PS: Mercury is POISON. If you happen to break a lamp take cleaning
measures. There is info on the web about this (do a search if in need).

Peter


'Eprom eraser'
1999\08\12@061222 by Justin Grimm
flavicon
face
Hi all
Is the shortwave UV lamp in an eprom eraser the type that
produces ozone?
Thanks

1999\08\12@063303 by Sebastián Dols

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face
the best UV lamps to erase eproms are the 'germicide' type, and are the most
dangerous to the eyes. If you are seeking a cheap, easy to use eprom eraser,
use a face-tanning machine (these that are used at home only to tan the
face). It includes a minute-accuracy timer, and from a surplus or from a
second hand beauty saloon are easy to find and really cheap.


----- Original Message -----
From: Justin Grimm <EraseMEeclipsespamspamspamBeGoneCOASTLINK.COM.AU>
To: <RemoveMEPICLISTKILLspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: jueves 12 de agosto de 1999 12:24
Subject: Eprom eraser


Hi all
Is the shortwave UV lamp in an eprom eraser the type that
produces ozone?
Thanks

1999\08\12@090824 by Roland Andrag

flavicon
face
Yes, also known as a germicidal bulb..

For example, I'm using a G6T5 germicidal bulb, which is a 6 watt bulb 210 mm
long. Since it is a fluorescent, you also need a starter and a ballast.  The
ballast goes in series with the bulb and starter, which are in parallel.
The starter conducts the current necessary to heat the filaments of the lamp
to get it to start.  If you need more info, give a shout.


The bulb erases a 16C711 in about 3 minutes, and a much more dense 17C44 in
about 12 minutes.

Cheers
Roland
-----Original Message-----
From: Justin Grimm <eclipseSTOPspamspamspam_OUTCOASTLINK.COM.AU>
To: spamBeGonePICLISTSTOPspamspamEraseMEMITVMA.MIT.EDU <KILLspamPICLISTspamBeGonespamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Date: 12 August 1999 12:24
Subject: Eprom eraser


>Hi all
>Is the shortwave UV lamp in an eprom eraser the type that
>produces ozone?
>Thanks
>

1999\08\12@100754 by Wagner Lipnharski

picon face
Roland Andrag wrote:
>
> Yes, also known as a germicidal bulb..
>
> For example, I'm using a G6T5 germicidal bulb, which is a 6 watt bulb 210 mm
> long. Since it is a fluorescent, you also need a starter and a ballast.  The
> ballast goes in series with the bulb and starter, which are in parallel.
> The starter conducts the current necessary to heat the filaments of the lamp
> to get it to start.  If you need more info, give a shout.
>
> The bulb erases a 16C711 in about 3 minutes, and a much more dense 17C44 in
> about 12 minutes.

There is also a small germicidal lamp, less than 5 inches (120mm), I
used it for more than 5 years erasing eproms, very small, fast (less
than 7 min) and easy to build inside any plastic case.  Several UV lamps
can be used to erase windowed chips, some works better than another
(this is because the UV frequency, irradiation intensity...), but it
needs to irradiate UV, so the body should be crystal (not glass) and the
famous black bulbs will not work, glass or any coating (as the black
ones) blocks the UV light.  Just take extra care to never look at the
light, it can create severe problems at your eyes retine.  Build it
inside a box (plastic, metal) in a way that you cover the chips (on the
table) with the box upside down. Install a power switch that turns on
the lamp only when it is resting upside down over the table and the
chips.

1999\08\12@171409 by paulb

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face
Justin Grimm wrote:

> Is the shortwave UV lamp in an eprom eraser the type that produces
> ozone?

 Yes.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1999\08\12@183701 by l.allen

picon face
> Hi all
> Is the shortwave UV lamp in an eprom eraser the type that
> produces ozone?
> Thanks

I probably should let this go
But I cant help myself....

UV producing ozone as a product?
I thought ozone O3 was a charged oxygen ion that happens due to high
voltages like lightening, high voltage PSU,s etc and that ozone had
UV blocking properties somewhat useful to life on earth and that
CFC's go around removing said charge in a catalytic manner, thus
undoing our useful ozone layer.

But then again this might be another trick question????????
_____________________________

Lance Allen
Technical Officer
Uni of Auckland
Psych Dept
New Zealand
_____________________________

1999\08\12@184317 by Roland Andrag

flavicon
face
I definitely get a distinct whiff of ozone when I open the cover of my
eraser after its been on a few minutes.

cheers
Roland

{Original Message removed}

1999\08\12@191206 by paulb

flavicon
face
Lance Allen wrote:

> But then again this might be another trick question????????

 Yes, in this respect it *is* a bit of a "trick" question.  The Oxygen
in the atmosphere absorbs the UV, being converted to Ozone in the
process.  The Ozone may absorb more UV again but I'm not sure how it
then releases the energy.

 Anyway, Ozone is an *indicator* of UV absorption by Oxygen.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1999\08\13@091356 by Barry King

flavicon
face
> Justin Grimm wrote:
> Is the shortwave UV lamp in an eprom eraser the type that produces
> ozone?

> Paul B. wrote:
>   Yes.

I think Justin is asking if the UV lamps made specifically to
generate ozone are also the optimum wavelength for erasing EPROMs.

Paul- are they really the same spectrum?  Or are you saying
that EPROM erasers generate some ozone, whether or not its intended?

I thought germicidal lamps and EPROM eraser lamps had different
spectra.  If they are the same, "germicidal" lamps are sometimes
cheap in farm-supply stores and such.  Maybe I can re-lamp my aged
EPROM eraser cheaply?

Preparing to stand (well, sit) corrected,

Barry.
------------
Barry King, KA1NLH
Engineering Manager
NRG Systems "Measuring the Wind's Energy"
Hinesburg, Vermont, USA
http://www.nrgsystems.com

1999\08\13@095122 by Wagner Lipnharski

picon face
Barry King wrote:
[snip]
> I thought germicidal lamps and EPROM eraser lamps had different
> spectra.  If they are the same, "germicidal" lamps are sometimes
> cheap in farm-supply stores and such.  Maybe I can re-lamp my aged
> EPROM eraser cheaply?

My "sleeping in the drawer beauty" eprom eraser was built with a small
UV lamp with the "germicidal application" text on the lamp package.

1999\08\14@100133 by paulb

flavicon
face
Barry King wrote:

> I think Justin is asking if the UV lamps made specifically to
> generate ozone are also the optimum wavelength for erasing EPROMs.

 That was my "Yes".  The (older) references in EPROM data sheets point
out the use of "without filter" or "unfiltered" lamps.  It appears that
lamps with a filter (coating) are produced to *not* generate Ozone,
though their germicidal effect would obviously be much weakened into the
bargain.

> Or are you saying that EPROM erasers generate some ozone, whether or
> not its intended?

 It's a good indicator that it's working; just keep your nose away.
References on the list to old tubes taking ridiculously long times to
erase chips though still lighting up may relate to this.  If it loses
its smell, it's probably time for a new tube.

> If they are the same, "germicidal" lamps are sometimes cheap in farm-
> supply stores and such.  Maybe I can re-lamp my aged EPROM eraser
> cheaply?

 Someone else appears to have suggested that already.

 And to repeat a much older posting, my father (a Science teacher/
subject master) once made an Ozone generator using a Pyrex condenser
unit (i.e., the sort used for distillation) with foil electrodes down
the centre and around the jacket, connected to a Neon sign transformer
(terrific devices those...).  Worked a treat (i.e., using direct HV
corona discharge).
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

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