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'creative ways to surface mount'
1998\11\29@215956 by Steve Tomes

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I have gone almost completely to surface mount but still looking for
inexpensive ways to implement component mounting....I now use bobbie pins
and a very fine low wattage tip.....
looking for other ideas??????????

1998\11\29@220407 by Gabriel Gonzalez

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Try soldering paste and a small electric baking oven...

Calvin


-----Original Message-----
From: Steve Tomes <spam_OUTstevetomTakeThisOuTspamGATE.NET>
To: .....PICLISTKILLspamspam@spam@MITVMA.MIT.EDU <PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Date: Sunday, November 29, 1998 7:56 PM
Subject: creative ways to surface mount


>I have gone almost completely to surface mount but still looking for
>inexpensive ways to implement component mounting....I now use bobbie pins
>and a very fine low wattage tip.....
>looking for other ideas??????????

1998\11\30@125111 by Peter L. Peres

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On Sun, 29 Nov 1998, Steve Tomes wrote:

> I have gone almost completely to surface mount but still looking for
> inexpensive ways to implement component mounting....I now use bobbie pins
> and a very fine low wattage tip.....
> looking for other ideas??????????

Make yourself a correct flux/solder powder recipe, get the curing time
right (the flux has to dry before you heat so it does not boil under the
parts), and then use a 400 Watt handheld blower with a wide nozzle to
preheat and then flow the whole (small) board (I do this all the time but
BEWARE - I've been at it for ~8 years ! It won't work the 1st 20 times).

For the faint at heart use a grill oven (~2000Watt IR type, with door -
breadbox style), and a Teflon foil to put the board on and establish a
temperature profile that will get you there (many trials). Later you can
make a timer clock that will make you the temperature profile (including
flux curing) and ding at the end. This one is a project that has been on
my wish list for about 5 years. I'll probably use a washing machine drum
timer and not a PIC for this ;).

The blower is fast, I also use it for reworking, BUT it requires
experience. Otherwise you will be looking for 2010's on the carpet,
forever ;)

Peter

1998\11\30@162753 by Harold Hallikainen

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       Years ago I recall seeing a vapor phase soldering system for SMT
that I thought was pretty neat.  I haven't seen it since.  It consisted
of a Pyrex container with condensor tubes around the top.  You'd put some
liquid in the bottom and run water through the condensor tube.  the
liquid would be heated to boiling, but the condensor kept it from
escaping.  You'd lower the SMT board into the vapor, and everything would
be instantly soldered (the parts were held in place with solder paste).
       It's probably been 5 or 10 years since I saw that machine.  No
one else seems to have seen it.  Anyone know if it's still produced?


Harold



Harold Hallikainen
.....haroldKILLspamspam.....hallikainen.com
Hallikainen & Friends, Inc.
See the FCC Rules at http://hallikainen.com/FccRules and comments filed
in LPFM proceeding at http://hallikainen.com/lpfm

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1998\11\30@211703 by Herb Montes
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At 09:59 PM 11/29/98 -0500, you wrote:
>I have gone almost completely to surface mount but still looking for
>inexpensive ways to implement component mounting....I now use bobbie pins
>and a very fine low wattage tip.....
>looking for other ideas??????????
>

I don't how easy this would be to implement but a medical electronics
manufacturer I worked for used the "Vapor Phase Process" for surface mount
circuits.  This involved using two chemicals, one had a lower boiling point
but a higher density than the other.  These chemicals would be heated in a
vat.  The chemicals would vaporize but one would stay above the other like
a thermal blanket retaining the heat of the other chemical vapor in the
vat.  The circuit board with solder paste silk screened on it would have
the components placed on it and lowered into the vat of hot vapor which
would melt the paste.  The circuit boards would be of ceramic cladded metal
which could stand up to the high vapor heat.  The solder paste was finely
ground tin/lead solder mixed with rosin.  Variations would include using
hot air instead of the chemical vapors.

-Herb

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