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'controller'
1999\07\06@203541 by Tony Nixon

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Hi all,

I've just been saddled with an interesting PIC job.

What I need to do is use something like a Nintendo steering wheel and
make a real steering wheel mirror it's movement over a 180 degree arc.

Due to physical and other constraints, the only way I can rotate the
real steering wheel is to have a 25mm diameter friction wheel rubbing up
against it's bottom edge, possibly by using a narrow toothed rubber belt
as the driving surface.

The RPM range for the friction wheel is from 0 ~ 300 RPM to give the
desired response.

Mirroring the rate of turning is going to be the biggest problem to
overcome in software and I am thinking of controlling a small 12V DC
motor via PWM. I was looking at a wiper motor, but the final RPM is too
slow.

Does anyone have any links that may assist in defining this algorithm?

--
Best regards

Tony

'The Engine' - Design your own programmer.

http://www.picnpoke.com
Email spam_OUTpicnpokeTakeThisOuTspamcdi.com.au

1999\07\06@211641 by Jamil J. Weatherbee

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Looks like a good job for Proportional-Derivative compensation.  Motorola
Application Note AN1215/D should get you headed in the right direction.
Recommend you prototype using a C Compiler.  I can send you some sample
CCS C code if you want (assuming I can find it), that I wrote for a
16c73a.


On Wed, 7 Jul 1999, Tony Nixon wrote:

{Quote hidden}

1999\07\06@213723 by Tony Nixon

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Hi Jamil

"Jamil J. Weatherbee" wrote:
>
> Looks like a good job for Proportional-Derivative compensation.  Motorola
> Application Note AN1215/D should get you headed in the right direction.
> Recommend you prototype using a C Compiler.  I can send you some sample
> CCS C code if you want (assuming I can find it), that I wrote for a
> 16c73a.

Thanks for the offer. I'll look at the App Note.

My C code is as good as my 'D' code.

I'm into Pascal.

--
Best regards

Tony

'The Engine' - Design your own programmer.

http://www.picnpoke.com
Email picnpokespamKILLspamcdi.com.au

1999\07\07@092332 by Ian Cull

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In a message dated 99-07-06 20:35:59 EDT, you write:

{Quote hidden}

Seems that using two position encoders might be your easiest solution - then
the PIC simply has to maintain both encoders at the same position.

Ian C.

1999\07\07@094031 by Michael Rigby-Jones

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This sounds like you need a bigger version of an RC servo motor.  You could
either implement a servo controller with a PIC or there are a few IC's which
will do this function.  You could maybe even use the innards of an RC servo
driving some big power transistors.  You'd need to rig up a potentiometer to
the steering wheel, and it would probably have to be a multiturn type.  An
optical encoder would give greater reliabiliy and life, but absolute
position encoders usualy work over just one revolution, although I guess
multi-turn ones must be available somewhere.

All the remote PIC would have to do then would be to send a pulse train with
the pulse width proportional to the position of the (nintendo) steering
wheel.

A 1:1 scale RC car sounds like a fun thing to have...if you have the space.

Regards

Mike Rigby-Jones


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