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'Zero Ohm Resistor'
1996\10\11@133650 by Edwin Park

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    When I first saw a zero ohm resistor, I thought it was silly too, but
    here is the way I saw it used.  It was used to choose a setting.  At
    the node, there was a real resistor tied to +5, a zero ohm to ground.
    With the zero ohm resistor, the node a logic 0.  If one wants a
    certain setting, you cut the resistor to make the node a logic 1.  The
    zero ohm resistor makes the node easier to identify on the board.
    Think of it as a dip switch you can only set once.

    Now saying this, I could never find a reason why one would want a
    surface mount zero ohm resistor.

    -Edwin

1996\10\11@163248 by mfahrion

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>
>      Now saying this, I could never find a reason why one would want a
>      surface mount zero ohm resistor.
>
>      -Edwin
>

For the same reason, using a handful of zero ohm resistors, one pcbd
may be able to be used for several different products or versions of
a product by simply changing the pick and place program.
Just think - if every trace was made of zero ohm resistors, you'd
never need to do another board change! :)

Also, designing a few zero ohm resistors into a product with
thoughts of future revisions or potential pitfalls can make a product
revision much more painless by (potentially) avoiding a new pcbd
layout.  Granted, this is a luxury that probably can't be afforded in
high volume designs, but into the 10's of thousands it can payoff.

-mike
spam_OUTmfahrionTakeThisOuTspambb-elec.com

1996\10\11@164907 by Mark A. Corio

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In a message dated 96-10-11 16:15:45 EDT, you write:

>     Now saying this, I could never find a reason why one would want a
>     surface mount zero ohm resistor.

Think of it as a configuration switch set once at pcb assembly time.

Mark A. Corio
Rochester MicroSystems, Inc.
200 Buell Road, Suite 9
Rochester, NY  14624
Tel:  (716) 328-5850 --- Fax:  (716) 328-1144
http://www.frontiernet.net/~rmi/

***** Designing Electronics For Research & Industry *****

1996\10\11@172941 by Adrian Kennard

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>
>      When I first saw a zero ohm resistor, I thought it was silly too, but
>      here is the way I saw it used.  It was used to choose a setting.  At
>      the node, there was a real resistor tied to +5, a zero ohm to ground.
>      With the zero ohm resistor, the node a logic 0.  If one wants a
>      certain setting, you cut the resistor to make the node a logic 1.  The
>      zero ohm resistor makes the node easier to identify on the board.
>      Think of it as a dip switch you can only set once.
>
>      Now saying this, I could never find a reason why one would want a
>      surface mount zero ohm resistor.

Used all the time.. They allow different configurations of a board
simply by changing the load tape for the SMD placement machines (i.e.
same PCB used). In some boards they allow a jump over a track without having
to use an extra pair of vias - useful on simple single sided boards.

Adrian.

1996\10\12@025343 by wfdavis
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Don't laugh!  If high temperature superconductors ever make it to the
room temperature range, you may be able to buy one.

--- Warren Davis
================================================
Davis Associates, Inc.
43 Holden Road
West Newton, MA 02165  U.S.A.

Tel: 617-244-1450        FAX: 617-964-4917
Visit our web site at:  http://www.davis-inc.com
================================================

1996\10\13@201757 by owler, Gary

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> From: Adrian Kennard

<cut>

> >      Now saying this, I could never find a reason why one would want a
> >      surface mount zero ohm resistor.
>
> Used all the time.. They allow different configurations of a board
> simply by changing the load tape for the SMD placement machines (i.e.
> same PCB used). In some boards they allow a jump over a track without
having
> to use an extra pair of vias - useful on simple single sided boards.
>
> Adrian.
>

Not only on simple single sided boards. We have used them on a high speed
(1GHz) board where the extra capacitance and track length of going through 2
vias can make a big difference!

Gary.

--------------------------------------------
Email: .....Gary.FowlerKILLspamspam@spam@dsto.defence.gov.au
Phone: +61 8 8259 5767
Fax:   +61 8 8259 5672

Defence Science & Technology Organisation
PO Box 1500, Salisbury, South Australia 5108
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