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PICList Thread
'World wide single chip power supply'
1999\06\29@034009 by John Perkinton

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I need a space saving power supply for powering a pic chip and very little
other components from the mains directly which will work in any country.
I've been looking at the Harris Semiconductor HV-2405E which RS Components
can supply, but due to the size on inline power resistor (5W) the heat
disapation is very high, no use for plastic enclosures. Has anyone any other
ideas, or should I just use a 240V-12V transormer, a bridge rectifier, a 35V
470uF cap, and a 7805. This seems to work well on both 240V and 110V, but is
rather large, or does anyone know of a supplier of ultra small transformers.

1999\06\29@040738 by Tjaart van der Walt

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John Perkinton wrote:
>
> I need a space saving power supply for powering a pic chip and very little
> other components from the mains directly which will work in any country.
> I've been looking at the Harris Semiconductor HV-2405E which RS Components
> can supply, but due to the size on inline power resistor (5W) the heat
> disapation is very high, no use for plastic enclosures. Has anyone any other
> ideas, or should I just use a 240V-12V transormer, a bridge rectifier, a 35V
> 470uF cap, and a 7805. This seems to work well on both 240V and 110V, but is
> rather large, or does anyone know of a supplier of ultra small transformers.

That chip is going out of production. Supertex (http://www.supertex.com) has a
range of really cheap chips that can do the job. The HV9120 is around $1.80.
You will need a choke, or a transformer depending on the safety level.

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1999\06\29@103622 by Dan Larson

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On Mon, 28 Jun 1999 16:20:09 +0100, John Perkinton wrote:

>I need a space saving power supply for powering a pic chip and very little
>other components from the mains directly which will work in any country.
>I've been looking at the Harris Semiconductor HV-2405E which RS Components
>can supply, but due to the size on inline power resistor (5W) the heat
>disapation is very high, no use for plastic enclosures. Has anyone any other
>ideas, or should I just use a 240V-12V transormer, a bridge rectifier, a 35V
>470uF cap, and a 7805. This seems to work well on both 240V and 110V, but is
>rather large, or does anyone know of a supplier of ultra small transformers.
>

That 7805 is gonna cook just like that 5W resistor when the transformer
is being fed 240V!

Most computer power supplies will run on 120 or 240.  Perhaps a
small computer power supply might help.  There are surplus switcher
supplies around too that may help but in a smaller or larger version
depending on your needs. I think Jameco has plenty. http://www.jameco.com

My $.02US

Dan

1999\06\29@104050 by Wagner Lipnharski

picon face
According to your text, it looks like your circuit needs around 20mA...
small switching power supplies can fit inside a small wall wart plastic
case.  I may be redundant, but why not using a regular wall wart 110/220
- 5Vdc - 50mA, small and simple.
Wagner.

John Perkinton wrote:
>
> I need a space saving power supply for powering a pic chip and very little
> other components from the mains directly which will work in any country.
> I've been looking at the Harris Semiconductor HV-2405E which RS Components
> can supply, but due to the size on inline power resistor (5W) the heat
> disapation is very high, no use for plastic enclosures. Has anyone any other
> ideas, or should I just use a 240V-12V transormer, a bridge rectifier, a 35V
> 470uF cap, and a 7805. This seems to work well on both 240V and 110V, but is
> rather large, or does anyone know of a supplier of ultra small transformers.

1999\06\29@110755 by Adam Davis

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Study switching power supplies.  If you only need 5 volts, use a transformer
rated for, let's say 24 VAC at 240 in.  At 120 in you'll get 12vac, and there
are many switchers available with an output of 5v and input ranging from 8-30
volts.  Or, go to Radio Shack and get their power supply book, which gives
enough info to design and build your own switchers (plus the obligatory linear
regulators).  (Sorry to those international members of the PICList, I do not
know of a similar resource for a good power supply book)

-Adam

John Perkinton wrote:
>
> I need a space saving power supply for powering a pic chip and very little
> other components from the mains directly which will work in any country.
> I've been looking at the Harris Semiconductor HV-2405E which RS Components
> can supply, but due to the size on inline power resistor (5W) the heat
> disapation is very high, no use for plastic enclosures. Has anyone any other
> ideas, or should I just use a 240V-12V transormer, a bridge rectifier, a 35V
> 470uF cap, and a 7805. This seems to work well on both 240V and 110V, but is
> rather large, or does anyone know of a supplier of ultra small transformers.

1999\06\29@140803 by Harold Hallikainen

picon face
       It seems that the best way to get a universal input power supply
is to go to a switcher.  There are now a variety of "wall wart" universal
input switchers.  These are nice in that they already have all the safety
approvals and EMC approvals.
       Several companies are now making flyback switcher chips that
include the controller and power FET on one chip.
       Here are a few places to check...
<ul>
<li>Power Supplies</li>
   <ul>
     <li><a href="http://www.astrodyne.com">Astrodyne</a> - Switchers
and DC to DC converters</li>
     <li><a href="http://www.autec.com">Autec</a> - Switchers including
power supply used in DRC190</li>
     <li><a href="http://www.aultinc.com">Ault</a> - Extensive line of
international wall warts.  Available
       from Scott Partlow at Powerspec at +1 408 748 9900 x229</li>
     <li>CET Technology - phone +1 603 894 6100 - Wallmount, desktop,
linear and switcher</li>
     <li><a href="http://www.elpac.com">Elpac</a> - Universal input AC
adaptors and more</li>
     <li><a href="http://www.friwo.com">Friwo</a> - AC/DC wall adaptors,
including international.
       Pages list part numbers for DC output wall warts for US, Euro and
UK use.  The MultiPower Plug 10
       has interchangeable input plugs for US, Japan, Europe, UK, and
Australia.</li>
     <li><a href="http://www.gpelectronics.com">Golden Pacific</a> -
External switchers</li>
     <li><a href="http://www.jeromeindustries.com">Jerome Industries</a>
- Various, including wall wart</li>
     <li><a href="http://www.newportcomps.com">Newport Components</a> -
DC to DC converters</li>
     <li><a href="http://www.operatingtech.com">Operating Technical
Electronics<a/> - Universal input switchers, including external</li>
     <li><a href="http://www.phihongusa.com">Phihong USA</a> - Universal
input switching wall warts, and more</li>
     <li><a href="www.eemonline.com/pillarind">Pillar
Industries</a> - AC/DC adaptors, including international</li>
     <li><a href="http://www.rodaletech.com">Rodale</a> - Wall warts,
transformers, power supplies</li>
     <li><a href="http://www.shogyo.com">Shogyo</a> - Transformers and
wall warts</li>
     <li><a href="http://www.total-power.com">Total Power
International</a> - Wall warts and table top</li>
     <li><a href="www.xentek.com">Xentek</a></li>
   </ul>
<li>Semiconductors</li>
   <ul>
    <li><a href="http://www.powerint.com">Power Integrations</a> -
Switching power chips</li>
      <li><a href="http://www.st.com">STMicro</a> - SGS
       <ul>
         <li><a
href="http://www.st.com/stonline/books/pdf/docs/5137.pdf">Viper100</a> -
100W SMPS chip</li>
       </ul>
</ul>

Harold





Harold Hallikainen
.....haroldKILLspamspam@spam@hallikainen.com
Hallikainen & Friends, Inc.
See the FCC Rules at http://hallikainen.com/FccRules and comments filed
in LPFM proceeding at http://hallikainen.com/lpfm


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1999\06\30@052935 by Robert K. Johnson

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Rohm makes a 5volt power supply chip (switcher) that will work from 85 to
264 vac...
as to the 5 watt resistor...  if one slelcts a capacitor that has an
equivalent reactance at 55 hertz the circuit might work... with no heat
dissapation except from the regulator itself

                       Robert K. Johnson
                       rkj1spamKILLspamix.netcom.com

At 04:20 PM 6/28/99 +0100, you wrote:
>I need a space saving power supply for powering a pic chip and very little
>other components from the mains directly which will work in any country.
>I've been looking at the Harris Semiconductor HV-2405E which RS Components
>can supply, but due to the size on inline power resistor (5W) the heat
>disapation is very high, no use for plastic enclosures. Has anyone any other
>ideas, or should I just use a 240V-12V transormer, a bridge rectifier, a 35V
>470uF cap, and a 7805. This seems to work well on both 240V and 110V, but is
>rather large, or does anyone know of a supplier of ultra small transformers.

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