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'Windows NT + Maplin programmer experiences'
1998\08\23@080747 by Bob Cousins

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Just a quick info burst on getting up and running with a parallel programmer
under NT.

The Maplin PIC programmer is a 16X84 parallel programmer based on David Tait's
design, and is available as kit or assembled. I built the kit, and found
construction straightforward. There is one component apparently spare but which
is marked on PCB and not mentioned in the instruction leaflet. The PCB mounting
bolts seemed too short, and the box screws were difficult to insert without
stripping the head.

Overall a very good kit, but a pre-drilled box would be perfect ;-)

I made a slight modification which is to add trailing power leads to provide +5V
and +12V from standard PC power connector.

I drive the kit with the 95/NT version of Nigel Goodwin's programming software,
which is an excellent application, and which can be configured to work with any
parallel prototype programmer it seems. Unfortunately I selected the wrong
config and caused myself a lot of confusion! The Maplin kit has inverters on all
lines, and otherwise uses standard port/signal mappings.

Thanks to Nigel and Alan for their help, and also to all the other people who
make info available on the web, it's really appreciated.

Right, where's that breadboard...
--
Bob Cousins, Software Engineer.
Home page at http://www.lintilla.demon.co.uk/

1998\08\23@092821 by cousens

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Bob Cousins wrote:

snip
> The Maplin PIC programmer is a 16X84 parallel programmer based on David Tait's

> I made a slight modification which is to add trailing power leads to provide +
5V
> and +12V from standard PC power connector.


Are you using 12V vpp ? does it work reliably ?

I have my programer (not a maplin kit) built behind a disk slot cover
with the PIC socket on the outside, so it's permanantly fixed in the
computer.

I would also like to take power from the computer, getting rid of the
wallwart
would be nice, but if it requires fitting an inverter I don't think it's
worth the hassle.

--
Peter Cousens
email: spam_OUTcousensTakeThisOuTspamher.forthnet.gr  phone: + 3081 380534
snailmail:  Folia, Agia Fotini, Karteros, Heraklion  Crete, Greece.

1998\08\23@103921 by Bob Cousins

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Peter Cousens wrote:

>Bob Cousins wrote:
>
>snip
>> The Maplin PIC programmer is a 16X84 parallel programmer based on David Tait's
>
>> I made a slight modification which is to add trailing power leads to provide +5V
>> and +12V from standard PC power connector.
>
>Are you using 12V vpp ? does it work reliably ?

Good question. Yes, 12V Vpp. I can't comment on reliability yet - its worked so
far on one chip. I've measured Vpp at 11.9V which is a bit under spec. I'm aware
there may be problems but I wanted to try it. I can already see 4 wallwarts from
here ;-)
--
Bob Cousins, Software Engineer.
Home page at http://www.lintilla.demon.co.uk/

1998\08\23@161257 by Mike Keitz

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On Sun, 23 Aug 1998 16:24:43 +0300 Peter Cousens
<.....cousensKILLspamspam@spam@her.forthnet.gr> writes:

>Are you using 12V vpp ? does it work reliably ?

The 16X84 chips will tolerate a rather large range of Vpp voltage since
the voltage is only sensed by the chip to tell it to operate in
programming mode.  The voltage used to actually program the EEPROM memory
comes from an internal voltage booster supplied from Vdd.

The rest of the PIC line, based on EPROM technology, uses the external
voltage directly to program the EPROM.  Not only must the voltage be in a
closer range, but the Vpp supply needs to supply considerable current to
the chip during programming.

>I would also like to take power from the computer, getting rid of the
wallwart
>would be nice, but if it requires fitting an inverter I don't think
>it's
>worth the hassle.

If you program only 16X84's it should be OK to use 12V directly.  For
other chips a simple inverter could be used.  I think a capacitve "charge
pump" voltage booster followed by a linear regulator would be easiset,
since the programmer likely already has the linear regulator to deal with
unregulated wall-wart power.  There may be some high-voltage versions of
the old 6660 series of chips, but really a 555 and some diodes would do
fine here.

Also the PICSTART 16B and PICSTART Plus work just fine supplied with 12V
from the computer's power supply.  Be sure the voltage is not more than
12.75V, as the 78S40 Vpp generator used in the PICSTARTs can only
increase the voltage, not reduce it.   So too much input voltage will
cause too high a Vpp voltage.


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