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'Which Databooks? / Mac Development'
1995\06\30@132502 by Christopher Kristof

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What Databooks???
-----------------
   I called uChip early last week and asked for databooks covering the
pic line.  To my absolute amazement, UPS showed up at my door the very
next day with the 94/95 Embedded Control Handbook!  While the Embedded
Control Handbook is great, I was a little disappointed to find that it's
just a collection of app notes.  I was more interested in nitty gritty
programming info on the individual processors, such as instruction set,
architecture, and device programming.  I'd like to build a 16C84
programmer for the Mac and write my own assembler/downloader.  I have an
old uChip databook called, simply, "Microchip Databook 1992" which
covers serial eeproms, pic family overviews, and logic products.  It
would be nice to have detailed info on uChip's serial eeproms and the
complete pic line.  What databooks should I ask for?


Mac Development Plans
---------------------
   I'm glad to see the recent Mac Development thread; I don't feel
alone anymore!  In any case, I plan to bootstrap myself with a little
16C84 serial programmer and then build a universal pic programmer using
the '84.  I'm also going to write an assembler and a little language or
two to go along with the programmer.  I'll post my progress from time to
time if people are interested.


Chris Kristof
Senior ECE Major
Carnegie Mellon University

1995\06\30@152828 by Patrick C Leger

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Hi again,

I ordered the Microchip full-line databook from Digi-Key (probably a
stupid move, since you managed to get the other databook free).  I'm
not sure what year it is, but it's got all the current PICs in it as
well as all (I think) of uChip's other stuff.  Building a programmer
for the '84 isn't too bad, actually; You can buy the necessary
hardware and an '84 for around $15.  As for the program, I've got one
for DOS that I hacked up from two other programs; you should just have
to change the functions for dealing with the parallel port on the Mac.
Let me know if you're interested, and I'll stick it in my public
directory.

Chris

--
Chris Leger (spam_OUTblahTakeThisOuTspamcmu.edu)
Carnegie Mellon University
Field Robotics Center

1995\06\30@184556 by tnguyen

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    It's "PIC16/17 Microcontroller Data Book 1995/1996" edition.

    Thang


______________________________ Forward Header __________________________________
Subject: Which Databooks? / Mac Development
Author:  Christopher Kristof <ck3i+@ANDREW.CMU.EDU> at Internet_Exchange
Date:    6/30/95 1:22 PM


What Databooks???
-----------------
   I called uChip early last week and asked for databooks covering the
pic line.  To my absolute amazement, UPS showed up at my door the very
next day with the 94/95 Embedded Control Handbook!  While the Embedded
Control Handbook is great, I was a little disappointed to find that it's
just a collection of app notes.  I was more interested in nitty gritty
programming info on the individual processors, such as instruction set,
architecture, and device programming.  I'd like to build a 16C84
programmer for the Mac and write my own assembler/downloader.  I have an
old uChip databook called, simply, "Microchip Databook 1992" which covers
serial eeproms, pic family overviews, and logic products.  It would be
nice to have detailed info on uChip's serial eeproms and the complete pic
line.  What databooks should I ask for?


Mac Development Plans
---------------------
   I'm glad to see the recent Mac Development thread; I don't feel
alone anymore!  In any case, I plan to bootstrap myself with a little
16C84 serial programmer and then build a universal pic programmer using
the '84.  I'm also going to write an assembler and a little language or
two to go along with the programmer.  I'll post my progress from time to
time if people are interested.


Chris Kristof
Senior ECE Major
Carnegie Mellon University


'Which Databooks? / Mac Development'
1995\07\01@042854 by Andrew Warren
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Christopher Kristof <ck3i+@ANDREW.CMU.EDU> wrote:

>I called uChip early last week and asked for databooks covering the
>pic line.  To my absolute amazement, UPS showed up at my door the very
>next day with the 94/95 Embedded Control Handbook!  While the Embedded
>Control Handbook is great, I was a little disappointed to find that
>it's just a collection of app notes.
> ....
>It would be nice to have detailed info on uChip's serial eeproms and
>the complete pic line.  What databooks should I ask for?

Christopher:

Thang's half-right; the "95/95 Microchip Data Book" covers the complete
PIC line.  For memory info, you also need the "95/96 Non-Volatile
Memory Products Data Book".

You probably didn't receive the data book(s) because they're
brand-new... You may be on a soon-to-be-processed waiting list.

-Andy

--
Andrew Warren - .....fastfwdKILLspamspam@spam@ix.netcom.com
Fast Forward Engineering, Vista, California

1995\07\02@035554 by David Kitts
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You wrote:
>
>Hi again,
>
>I ordered the Microchip full-line databook from Digi-Key (probably a
>stupid move, since you managed to get the other databook free).  I'm
>not sure what year it is, but it's got all the current PICs in it as
>well as all (I think) of uChip's other stuff.  Building a programmer
>for the '84 isn't too bad, actually; You can buy the necessary
>hardware and an '84 for around $15.  As for the program, I've got one
>for DOS that I hacked up from two other programs; you should just have
>to change the functions for dealing with the parallel port on the Mac.
>Let me know if you're interested, and I'll stick it in my public
>directory.
>
>Chris
>

Chris
David Tait has a programer for the 84 already designed. Might be
adaptable to the MAC.
TNX, David

1995\07\02@053330 by David Tait

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Hi

David Kitts <dkittsspamKILLspamCOM.NETCOM.IX> wrote:
> David Tait has a programer for the 84 already designed. Might be
> adaptable to the MAC.

The problem with that design is that it needs a parallel port, a
facility sadly missing on the Mac.

If you want to homebrew a programmer for the Mac the best approach, if
not the only approach, is to use a serial port for communicating with
the hardware.  This is where the ETI programmer, which has had so much
publicity on this list already, scores again.  The hardware uses a
preprogrammed 16C57 to implement a 3-wire serial connection with the
host.  As far as I know the only host software currently available is
for a PC running Windows, but as the ETI articles include a full
description of the serial protocol it should not be too difficult to
write host software for the Mac.

If you can't get hold of the ETI articles but want a look at a
schematic of the design you can grab a scanned image in GIF form.
It's available from Antti Lukats' FTP site:

ftp://rasi.lr.ttu.ee/pub/SIS/CAD/DIY/BITMAPS/eti.gif

It's a bit rough but it will give you an idea of what's involved.
Although the GIF is probably the best bet for Mac users, if you have a
PC you can grab a better schematic in Protel format together with a
freeware Protel viewer from the same site.  As I understand it, Robin
Abbott, the designer of the ETI programmer has given permission for
the schematic to be available in this form.  A Hex dump of the 16C57
code will soon be available from the same place.

I don't think it will be long before host software will be available
for most machines with a serial port because the protocol needed is so
simple and doesn't require any handshake lines.  I guess this is _the_
homebrew design for Macs and Unix boxes.

David
--
.....david.taitKILLspamspam.....man.ac.uk

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