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'What does "dd" stand for in "Vdd" ?'
2003\09\09@050552 by Richard Graziano

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The double d is for drain.  The double s is for source.  In field effect
devices the terminals are gate g, drain d, and source s.

{Original Message removed}

2003\09\09@080217 by Olin Lathrop

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> I can understand that "pp" in "Vpp" stands for "programming"
> in a way, but what does "dd" and "ss" in "Vdd" and "Vss"
> stand for ?

D-D-D-Drain, and S-S-S-S-Source.  I think these names are st-st-st-stupid,
but we're st-st-st-stuck with them.

> Or does anyone have a nice way to remember which of them
> is GND ? I have to look it up in the data sheet each time...

Vdd is power, Vss is ground.


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2003\09\09@093255 by Jack Smith

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Subject: Re: What does "dd" stand for in "Vdd" ?

I wonder if some of the confusion comes from not understanding the notation
convention used in electronics:

--For voltage (E or V), Current (I) and Resistance (R) references:

--Capital letters E,V,I and R indicate static values, i.e., non time
changing values.

--Small letters e,v,i and r indicate instantaneous values of time changing
values.

--Single subscripts refer to an element, e.g., for a bipolar transistor the
three elements are e=emitter, b=base and c=collector. Thus ib (imagine the b
is a subscript) means the instantaneous value of a time changing current (i)
in a transistor base (b).

--Double subscripts mean the parameter indicated by the first subscript is
with respect to the second. Thus, in a bipolar transistor, vbe means the
instantaneous voltage (v) measured at the base (b) with respect to the
emitter (e). If the second subscript is omitted, the reference is with
respect to circuit common or ground.

To prevent (cause?) confusion when dealing with static supply voltages, the
subscript is doubled. For bipolar transistors we have Vcc and vc, the first
meaning the static collector supply voltage and the second meaning the
instantaneous value of the collector voltage. Likewise Vee is the emitter
supply voltage for a bipolar, quite often, but not always, ground for an
NPN, but ve is the instantaneous voltage on the emitter with respect to
ground.

A strict reading of the term Vcc would be the collector supply with respect
to the collector supply, which is meaningless. Hence the doubled identical
reference subscript serves as an "escape" character, signaling to the reader
that a supply voltage is referenced.

And, yes, I'm sure we can find exceptions to these rules.


Jack



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2003\09\09@101924 by Tom

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At 09:31 AM 9/9/2003 -0400, you wrote:
>Subject: Re: What does "dd" stand for in "Vdd" ?

It must be due to the march of progress that all the replies so far
discussing Vdd and Vcc, etc., have not mentioned Vbb or V++.  Does anyone
have a good mnemonic for remembering these? Or how to label the screen
voltage or grid voltage?  All this "solid state" stuff is just a ridiculous
fad if you ask me.

Beam Power Pentodes Rule, Dewdz!
Tom

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2003\09\09@102338 by Harold Hallikainen

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And, remember the A battery (for filaments), the B battery (the plate supply), and the C battery (for grid bias)...

Harold


FCC Rules Online at http://www.hallikainen.com



-- Tom <spam_OUTkristTakeThisOuTspamTHEGRID.NET> wrote:


At 09:31 AM 9/9/2003 -0400, you wrote:
>Subject: Re: What does "dd" stand for in "Vdd" ?

It must be due to the march of progress that all the replies so far
discussing Vdd and Vcc, etc., have not mentioned Vbb or V++.  Does anyone
have a good mnemonic for remembering these? Or how to label the screen
voltage or grid voltage?  All this "solid state" stuff is just a ridiculous
fad if you ask me.

Beam Power Pentodes Rule, Dewdz!
Tom

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2003\09\09@103619 by Peter Moreton

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Brilliant insight Jack, thanks. Here us another question : When I design
circuits with both 5v and 3.3v supplies, I end up calling my supply
rails 'VCC5v' and 'VCC3v' or something similar. I'm sure this is wrong,
so what the 'correct' nomenclature for this situation?

Thanks, Peter Moreton

{Original Message removed}

2003\09\09@104039 by Tal

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If I recall correctly, this was originated from the conventions in the
vacuum tube era where the high volt positive voltage that fed the Anode
was called Vaa. This followed by Vcc for bipolar transistors and then
Vdd for FETs.

Tal

> {Original Message removed}

2003\09\09@184136 by Andrew Kieran

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As goofy as it sounds, I remember which one is which by thinking
about how idiotic these designations are. I mean, who really
thinks that VD is positive?

Seriously, that's how I remember that Vdd is positive.

Andrew

> I can understand that "pp" in "Vpp" stands for "programming"
> in a way, but what does "dd" and "ss" in "Vdd" and "Vss"
> stand for ?



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2003\09\10@100753 by Ron Hackett

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OK, I'll add my two cents:

I think of Vdd as two D-cell batteries (so it's positive), and Vss as
[the earth's]Surface, so it's ground - it works for me!

Ron


{Quote hidden}

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2003\09\10@102042 by Alexandre Souza

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> >Seriously, that's how I remember that Vdd is positive.

   You can just remember it, or understand it.

   Eletricity is "made" of electrons. These have negative charge. The real
"flow" of electricity is from negative to positive - the side who has more
electrons, give them for the side that has less electrons.

   Vdd means Voltage Drain, and Vss means Voltage Source

   Understanding the "real" (e.g.: Physical) flow of electricity, you
understand these terms in a moment! Voltage drain (positive) gets electrons
from the Voltage source (negative)

   Hope it helps ;o)


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2003\09\10@165758 by andre abelian

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Ron,

You didn't like what VDD means
What about this buying 2x4 wood when I measure
It is 1,5x3,5 buying 2x6 it is 1,5x5,5
Who ever okayed above standards must be stupidest
Person in this world.

Andre




{Original Message removed}

2003\09\10@170442 by David VanHorn

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At 02:01 PM 9/10/2003 -0700, andre abelian wrote:

>Ron,
>
>You didn't like what VDD means
>What about this buying 2x4 wood when I measure
>It is 1,5x3,5 buying 2x6 it is 1,5x5,5
>Who ever okayed above standards must be stupidest
>Person in this world.

there is lumber made to the 'real' size.
it's called 'dimensional'

sounds pretty stupid to me as well.

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2003\09\11@100928 by Sabachka

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I believe that the measured size used for the label is the size of the
wood before it is dried. It /was/ a 2x6, then when dried, it shrank
some.

On Wed, Sep 10, 2003 at 02:01:36PM -0700, andre abelian wrote:
> Ron,
> You didn't like what VDD means
> What about this buying 2x4 wood when I measure
> It is 1,5x3,5 buying 2x6 it is 1,5x5,5
> Who ever okayed above standards must be stupidest
> Person in this world.
> Andre

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2003\09\11@130130 by M. Adam Davis
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I hope that you don't actually believe they are stupid, never mind the
"stupidest person in this world"

The reason why wood is smaller than the name would suggest is that wood
is cut to size /before/ it's dried.  When it is dried it shrinks
laterally, but not so much vertically.  I suspect in many cases that
some wood is cut vertically after the drying process anyway, since it is
easier and faster to handle a hundred 24 foot poles than 200 twelve foot
or 300 eight foot poles.

Through the years people have come to expect a 2x4 to mean a smaller
board of a specific dimension, so lumber companies keep making wood of
the final smaller dimension regardless of the wood type and expected
shrinkage through carefully controlled measurements and processes.  They
have the ability to make dimensioned lumber with correct sizes by
cutting larger pieces before drying, but the whole constuction industry
would have to change their practices, for the architect to the framer.
Different nails and screws would be more commonly used than are used
now, and so on and so forth.

You've doubtless by now heard the old story about how wide a shuttle
booster is, going back to railroad guages which went back to the wheel
spacing of roman conquering chariots.  Whether the story is true or not,
it demonstrates a very human quality - that of backwards compatability.

It is easier to reach profitability with a new technology if you don't
force the consumer to throw away their old technology and re-buy working
tools and methods than it is to develop a completely new way of doing
something which denies them the use of their current tools and experience.

In a way it's like buying a 1/4 burger.  Have you weighed the meat in
the patty?  It's less than 1/4 pound.  It's only a 1/4 pounder before
cooking.  That 16 ounce streak at the restaurant?  Surprise!  All these
things are cut/measured before preparation.

-Adam

andre abelian wrote:

{Quote hidden}

>{Original Message removed}

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