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'Weird, Wacky, Zany PIC applications'
1999\05\04@190922 by Scott Fink

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part 0 999 bytes
    Five samples of your choice (yes, including JW) for those that I use
    in the presentation, and 10 for the wackiest application, but it must
    be a REAL application, and must be yours or someone you know that I
    can get the permission from.

    TIA,
    Scott Fink
    MCHP SMAD Applications Manager


______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________
Subject: "Smart Fabric, or Washable Computing" uses PIC
Author:  spam_OUTjclineTakeThisOuTspamEE.CALPOLY.EDU (Jonathan) at Internet_Exchange
Date:    5/4/99 10:06 AM


Surfing some current MIT research projects, their washable
computing research uses a PIC!

"A fabric breadboard or "smartkerchief". "
"...a PIC16C84 microcontroller and its supporting components are soldered
directly onto a square of fabric."

Cool!

       rehmi.http://www.media.mit.edu/people/rehmi/cloth/


Jonathan
.....jclineKILLspamspam@spam@ee.calpoly.edu
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1999\05\05@093348 by Ravi Pailoor

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Scott Fink wrote

I am putting together a short talk about Zany applications and hoped
that you folks could help me out.  If YOU have used a PIC in any
highly cool, or weird application, and I would be allowed to talk
about in public (i.e. no NDA) and would like your 15 minutes of fame,
please let me know all about your app!

Five samples of your choice (yes, including JW) for those that I use
in the presentation, and 10 for the wackiest application, but it must
be a REAL application, and must be yours or someone you know that I
can get the permission from.

TIA,
Scott Fink
MCHP SMAD Applications Manager

Application No. 1 - Running lights

I use a 12C508 with 4 transistors to drive a chain of different coloured
LED's on each line.
You can arrange it in a circular or oval shape - interleaved (A1 B1 C1 D1,
A2 B2 C2 D2... ).
I have 10 patterns running. The direction of rotation is clockwise and/or
anti clockwise depending on the pattern.
The speed of rotation also varies for a given pattern ( starts a slow
rotation and speeds up over a period of time, the visual effect is really
good ).

I also have intensity control for the LED's in a different model. If using
a bicolour LED, you can see colour change slowly from RED-ORANGE-GREEN and
back, RED off to slowly RED full brightness, etc.....( unlimited
combinations)
I also have a switch to lock / unlock a particular pattern.

Here in India it is used to decorate photo frames.
Currently it is in limited quantity production and am expecting a huge
order :-))

Application No. 2 - Temperature controlled Oscillator / Indicator

Again a 12C508 in the external RtC mode. The "t" is a thermistor. Connect a
piezo diaphragm to one of the output pins.
Have a small program to generate a continuous clock at the output.
Depending on the temperature, the oscillation frequency will change and
bring the continuous clock to the resonant frequency of the piezo and you
hear a sound. The threshold can be set based on the thermistor's curve.

This is in theory only and will have to try it out.

Application No. 3 - Popup Toaster Controller

A 12C508 is used. Pin 7 for Popup solenoid release. Pin 2, 3 and 6 for 4
LED's in multiplexed mode. Pin 5 connected to a beeper and a push to on
switch. Pin 4 as input to sense the START.

Using the switch, one of the 4 toasting time is selected, indicated by 4
LED's ( the beeper beeps for every switch press). After the last switch
press and a 2 second timeout, the timer starts its countdown ( the selected
LED keeps flashing) and on timeout, triggers the solonoid to Popup the
toast. The beeper comes on for a second to indicate timeout.

Made only one proto and it works fine and waiting for some customers.

Many more up my sleeve, some are under NDA and some are plain ideas.

Pailoor


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<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML>
<BODY TEXT="#000000" BGCOLOR="#CCCCCC" LINK="#0000EE" VLINK="#551A8B" ALINK="#FF
0000">
Scott Fink wrote
<P>I am putting together a short talk about Zany applications and hoped
<BR>that you folks could help me out.&nbsp; If YOU have used a PIC in any
<BR>highly cool, or weird application, and I would be allowed to talk
<BR>about in public (i.e. no NDA) and would like your 15 minutes of fame,
<BR>please let me know all about your app!
<P>Five samples of your choice (yes, including JW) for those that I use
<BR>in the presentation, and 10 for the wackiest application, but it must
<BR>be a REAL application, and must be yours or someone you know that I
<BR>can get the permission from.
<P>TIA,
<BR>Scott Fink
<BR>MCHP SMAD Applications Manager
<P><B>Application No. 1 - Running lights</B>
<P>I use a 12C508 with 4 transistors to drive a chain of different coloured
LED's on each line.
<BR>You can arrange it in a circular or oval shape - interleaved (A1 B1
C1 D1, A2 B2 C2 D2... ).
<BR>I have 10 patterns running. The direction of rotation is clockwise
and/or&nbsp; anti clockwise depending on the pattern.
<BR>The speed of rotation also varies for a given pattern ( starts a slow
rotation and speeds up over a period of time, the visual effect is really
good ).
<P>I also have intensity control for the LED's in a different model. If
using a bicolour LED, you can see colour change slowly from RED-ORANGE-GREEN
and back, RED off to slowly RED full brightness, etc.....( unlimited combination
s)
<BR>I also have a switch to lock / unlock a particular pattern.
<P>Here in India it is used to decorate photo frames.
<BR>Currently it is in limited quantity production and am expecting a huge
order :-))
<P><B>Application No. 2 - Temperature controlled Oscillator / Indicator</B>
<P>Again a 12C508 in the external RtC mode. The "t" is a thermistor. Connect
a piezo diaphragm to one of the output pins.
<BR>Have a small program to generate a continuous clock at the output.
Depending on the temperature, the oscillation frequency will change and
bring the continuous clock to the resonant frequency of the piezo and you
hear a sound. The threshold can be set based on the thermistor's curve.
<P>This is in theory only and will have to try it out.
<P><B>Application No. 3 - Popup Toaster Controller</B>
<P>A 12C508 is used. Pin 7 for Popup solenoid release. Pin 2, 3 and 6 for
4 LED's in multiplexed mode. Pin 5 connected to a beeper and a push to
on switch. Pin 4 as input to sense the START.
<P>Using the switch, one of the 4 toasting time is selected, indicated
by 4 LED's ( the beeper beeps for every switch press). After the last switch
press and a 2 second timeout, the timer starts its countdown ( the selected
LED keeps flashing) and on timeout, triggers the solonoid to Popup the
toast. The beeper comes on for a second to indicate timeout.
<P>Made only one proto and it works fine and waiting for some customers.
<P>Many more up my sleeve, some are under NDA and some are plain ideas.
<P>Pailoor
<BR>&nbsp;
</BODY>
</HTML>

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1999\05\05@100900 by Ian Rozowsky

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face
> Scott Fink wrote
>
> I am putting together a short talk about Zany applications and hoped
> that you folks could help me out.  If YOU have used a PIC in any
> highly cool, or weird application, and I would be allowed to talk
> about in public (i.e. no NDA) and would like your 15 minutes of fame,
> please let me know all about your app!
>
> Five samples of your choice (yes, including JW) for those that I use
> in the presentation, and 10 for the wackiest application, but it must
> be a REAL application, and must be yours or someone you know that I
> can get the permission from.
>
> TIA,
> Scott Fink
> MCHP SMAD Applications Manager
>

I did an application a while back for a TV game show sponsored by a
battery manufacturer. Two characters, called Sparkman (the good guy)
and Dr Dark (the meanie), romped around the studio, while the
contestants were asked electricity related questions. Each wrong
answer resulted in Dr Dark being given a "recharge" in the form of a
battery, which he dropped into a tube on his costume. His hat
contained a "Power meter", essentially a column of LEDS,  which
started off each round at "FULL", and slowly drained to "EMPTY", at
which point he was defeated. Each "Recharge" resulted in his power
being increased one notch on the "Power Meter". I used a '57 to drive
the column of LEDs, as well as generate a PWM output to an
incandescent bulb which glowed in proportion to the "POWER" left. A
microswitch in the tube sensed the passage of a battery, which upped
his power level.

Sparkman wore a helmet which sported a lightning bolt shaped line of
LEDs which were also '57 controlled, and were sequenced to look like
a bolt of lightning striking.

It gave me a huge kick to see these "toys" displayed on national
television :).

Ian Rozowsky
Development Engineer
Centurion Systems
Box 506 Cramerview 2060 South Africa
Tel   : +27-11-708-2680
Fax   : +27-11-708-2630
e-mail: EraseMErozspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTcentsys.co.za

1999\05\05@161613 by wwl

picon face
On Tue, 4 May 1999 16:03:00 -0700, you wrote:

>     I am putting together a short talk about Zany applications and hoped
>     that you folks could help me out.  If YOU have used a PIC in any
>     highly cool, or weird application, and I would be allowed to talk
>     about in public (i.e. no NDA) and would like your 15 minutes of fame,
>     please let me know all about your app!
>
>     Five samples of your choice (yes, including JW) for those that I use
>     in the presentation, and 10 for the wackiest application, but it must
>     be a REAL application, and must be yours or someone you know that I
>     can get the permission from.
>
>     TIA,
>     Scott Fink
>     MCHP SMAD Applications Manager
Does it have to be commercial..?
I once made a tiny device in the casing of a piezo sounder, which
emitted a short burst of rndom beeps every few minutes - stuck it
under someone's desk in a quiet office - drives people nuts as the
very short, multi-frequency beeps are VERY hard to get a 'direction'
fix on to find the device.

I thought of a fun variation on this - a device with an IR LED that
randomly changes TV channels every few minutes - again, stick it under
a table or whatever in sight of the TV but not the viewer!

1999\05\05@170425 by Niklas CarlŽn

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>I thought of a fun variation on this - a device with an IR LED that
>randomly changes TV channels every few minutes - again, stick it under
>a table or whatever in sight of the TV but not the viewer!


Actually a friend of mine have done this. Don't know if he used PIC
however....
Drived the victims nuts anyway....

/Niklas CarlŽn

1999\05\05@173227 by Ray Gardiner

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After a software upgrade.. (customer changed his mind about a feature!)
I found myself with bucketloads of code protected 16c74's (PLCC package),
so, I got a local jeweller to make a few into ear-rings. My wife loves them!

And, by the way, the machine is a silver recovery machine for recovering
silver from photographic chemicals. So even when not powered up they are
still saving silver.....


{Quote hidden}

Ray Gardiner rayspamspam_OUThdc.com.au

1999\05\05@223958 by Peter van Hoof

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face
has been done
A dutch magazine (i think electuur) had a cricket as a gag device
made thhe chirps you describe but also had a light sensor
dump it in a bedroom and several minutes after it being dark the crickt
starts to chirp
swithch the lights on to look for   it and it's quiet......
start from top

{Original Message removed}

1999\05\05@225307 by Mark Willis

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Mike Harrison wrote:
>
> On Tue, 4 May 1999 16:03:00 -0700, Scott Fink wrote:
> >     I am putting together a short talk about Zany applications and hoped
> >     that you folks could help me out.  If YOU have used a PIC in any
> > <snipped>
> >     TIA,
> >     Scott Fink
> >     MCHP SMAD Applications Manager
> Does it have to be commercial..?
> I once made a tiny device in the casing of a piezo sounder, which
> emitted a short burst of rndom beeps every few minutes - stuck it
> under someone's desk in a quiet office - drives people nuts as the
> very short, multi-frequency beeps are VERY hard to get a 'direction'
> fix on to find the device.
>
> I thought of a fun variation on this - a device with an IR LED that
> randomly changes TV channels every few minutes - again, stick it under
> a table or whatever in sight of the TV but not the viewer!

 Add periodically and randomly increasing the volume, hits "Mute",
and/or turning the TV on or off, if you want to REALLY bug your
victims...  (This is the "de Sade" variation.)

 I'd always wanted to make a "Countermander" which sees you hit "Volume
Up", and waits a few seconds then turns the volume down the same number
of notches (Ditto for volume down, power off, mute, etc.)  This, mixed
with the above, would probably be so mean I'd have to call within a day
& apologise! <G>

 I call these "Things too evil to make."

 Mark (can you tell it's been a HARD day?)

1999\05\06@003813 by Roger Shane

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----------
From:   Mike Harrison[SMTP:@spam@wwlKILLspamspamnetcomuk.co.uk]
Sent:   Thursday, May 06, 1999 3:15 AM
To:     KILLspamPICLISTKILLspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject:        Re: Weird, Wacky, Zany PIC applications
Importance:     High

> > > > snippity-kerchunk < < < < <

> I thought of a fun variation on this - a device with an IR LED that
> randomly changes TV channels every few minutes - again, stick it under
> a table or whatever in sight of the TV but not the viewer!

Heheheh...how about the TV section of your less than favorite department store?

Regards/Roger in Bangkok, gettin' ready to scope out Robinsons and Centrals A/V
sections!

WHADDAYA MEAN OT...who sez?

1999\05\06@024804 by : Cassie Carstens

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Hi
I am changing broken Motorola BPR2000 bleepers to bleep on command.
The micro and receiver pars gets ripped out, only the voltage doubler
(1.5 to 3V) and the 13 digit LCD stays. The unit switches on without
the normal beeps and by pressing the 'display number' button you
increment the time to beep with 5 minutes. It then resumes the '--'
display and starts countdown. The beep simulates the original and
display the tell number of your choice.
Good for:
1 getting out of meetings and tough spots.
2 reminder to turn off the garden sprayer.
3 getting in for a docter's appoinment. Keep bugging them to use their
phone to 'answer beeper'
4 parking meter reminder.
5 Sunday (lunch) snooze controller.
BTW. the C84 hangs by its legs. (like the Playstation chip -who is
going to offer the playstation chip as a Weird, Wac.....
application??)
Regards
Cassie

1999\05\06@040120 by Brian Jones

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face
Not my idea I'm afraid but also check out the June 99 (yes - it
came out last week!) edition of the UK magazine Everyday
Practical Electronics.

It has a PIC based sundial. When the shadow drops over one of the
hour markers the hours pip and the tune 'You are My Sunshine'
plays. Looks like a few other fun features also. Probably not up on
their website yet but their normal practice is to make the source
code available for FTP.

Brian
Brian E Jones
Centre for Java Technology
IBM HURSLEY

1999\05\06@063014 by ruben

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face
> Scott Fink wrote
>
> I am putting together a short talk about Zany applications and hoped
> that you folks could help me out.  If YOU have used a PIC in any
> highly cool, or weird application, and I would be allowed to talk
> about in public (i.e. no NDA) and would like your 15 minutes of fame,
> please let me know all about your app!
>
> Five samples of your choice (yes, including JW) for those that I use
> in the presentation, and 10 for the wackiest application, but it must
> be a REAL application, and must be yours or someone you know that I
> can get the permission from.
>
> TIA,
> Scott Fink
> MCHP SMAD Applications Manager
>

I used a 16c57 and 16 leds placed in the windows of a
christmas cake house. The program goes through a
series of blinking and dimming patterns for the leds.

Much appreciated by the kids.

I was thinking of making it interactive and respond
to sound and light, but that will be for another christmas.
==============================
Ruben Jvnsson
AB Liros Elektronik
Box 9124, 200 39 Malmv, Sweden
TEL INT +4640142078
FAX INT +4640947388
RemoveMErubenTakeThisOuTspam2.sbbs.se
==============================

1999\05\06@082459 by Jason Wolfson

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face
OK, here's mine:
I was hired a couple years ago by a company that makes Mosquito traps for
Entomologists.
These traps have a light and/or CO2 source to attract Mosquito's, and a bag
with a fan
in front of it to blow the Mosquitoes into the bag where they die and
dehydrate for study later.

Problem is these traps sit out in fields far from power sources so battery
life is an issue.

I used a '73 to control the trap. A CDS cell measured light, they only come
out after dark,
and then only for about 4 hours. A thermistor to measure temperature, they
only come out above
50F. The PIC would start flashing a little incandesanct light at dark above
50F, open the bag
door (solenoid) start the fan, and optionally start puffing out CO2 from a
small solenoid valve
and tank. After 4 hours, if so programmed, the whole thing shut down to
conserve battery power for
the next day. Door closed, CO2 stopped, light stopped, fan stopped etc....
Flash rates, puffing rates and a bunch of other options were all programmed
from a
8 pos-DIP switch. Worked great from what I hear....

thanks for listening....

Jason Wolfson

1999\05\06@102523 by Lawrence Lile

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face
Last summer Mid Missouri was infested with 17 year cicadas.  They make an
awful racket, and there were zillions of them. A single tree might contain
20,000 big eyed bugs, all going zoweeee zoweeee zoweeee... The combination
of thier calls becomes deafening.  It changes with the temperature, so that
on really hot days you can hardly think.  I'd wear earplugs in my yard, and
the heat and the deafening sound would make a wierd, Twighlight Zone feeling
come over me, like the aliens had landed.


So my friend had a 40th birthday.  I built a box with a switch on the lid,
put in a PIC, a dime sized battery and a piezo, and made them so they
sounded just like a 17 year Cicada.  I covered the PIC circuit with cloth,
and glued a plastic bug inside.  He opens the box and...

Zoweeee zoweee zoweee......

1999\05\06@181649 by Harold Hallikainen

picon face
On Thu, 6 May 1999 08:58:50 +0100 Brian Jones <spamBeGonebejonesspamBeGonespamHURSLEY.IBM.COM>
writes:
>Not my idea I'm afraid but also check out the June 99 (yes - it
>came out last week!) edition of the UK magazine Everyday
>Practical Electronics.
>
>It has a PIC based sundial. When the shadow drops over one of the
>hour markers the hours pip and the tune 'You are My Sunshine'
>plays. Looks like a few other fun features also. Probably not up on
>their website yet but their normal practice is to make the source
>code available for FTP.
>
>Brian
>Brian E Jones
>Centre for Java Technology
>IBM HURSLEY
>


       Neat project!  Especially the "You are my sunshine" part, which
is a favorite with my wife.  Anyway, I can see how this project could be
struck by creeping featurism...  It could be a sundial with a digital
display where there's a "noon detector" that sets a calibration factor
for the processor clock so it can correctly time the rest of the day and
night.  Although a bit more difficult, it appears there could also be a
shadow length detector which could be used to determine the date and
latitude (given enough time for the shadow to reach its maximum length).
       Some interesting stuff on clocks and the measurement of time is
in the book "The Discoverers."  As I recall, the original mechanical
clocks had 12 hours from sunrise to sunset, but they had to keep being
adjusted since the amount of "time" between sunrise and sunset varied.
They came up with elaborate mechanical methods to automatically adjust
the clock before finally coming up with the idea of letting there be time
after sunset and allowing the sunrise and sunset times to vary.


Harold




Harold Hallikainen
TakeThisOuTharoldEraseMEspamspam_OUThallikainen.com
Hallikainen & Friends, Inc.
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in LPFM proceeding at http://hallikainen.com/lpfm

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1999\05\06@191752 by Wagner Lipnharski

picon face
> >
> > Heheheh...how about the TV section of your less than favorite department
> store?
>
> You could also use the signals from the other remotes to tell you when the
> store is open, and when it's not.

fun and evil thing???  :)

just "plant" a small IR emmiter box in front of those "hundreds" of TVs
in the store, to do nothing else than just "power on/off" in several
manufacturers IR codes, every 10 minutes... it would be funny or what?

... or just "plant" it in your shirt pocket, with the IR led going out
as a shirt button, and ask the sales guy to demonstrate that special TV
set... on/off/on/off...

... or program the thing to issue the power off command 10 seconds after
receive any external IR remote command.

... or just generate a continuous 37kHz train pulse in IR and "paint"
all the ambient, while the other guys would try to use the useless
remotes...

for sure I suppose nobody would be so evil to do that, but we smile just
thinking about it, please don't do that. :)


Wagner

1999\05\07@131558 by Ross Bencina

flavicon
face
Hi Scott,

Here's my submission for Weird, Wacky, Zany PIC Applications:

Contemporary experimental music often attracts the the above descriptions,
with or without a PIC micro...

My latest construction is a PIC16F84 based "MIDI Theremin" which
continuously outputs a MIDI control value proportional to the distance of
the players hand from an "antenna" (For those not familiar with the
Theremin, it's an electronic musical instrument is played by moving your
hands through the air).  I use the MIDI control data to modulate various
sound synthesis parameters in my AudioMulch real-time sound synthesis
program. For additional "Wacky" points, the "antenna" is a mangled wire coat
hanger. At the moment this is a "studio only" construction, but I plan to
build a number of units and perform live with them later this year.

If you thought that was "Weird, Wacky and Zany" wait 'till you hear the
music!

Ross Bencina
http://www.audiomulch.com/~rossb/

1999\05\08@115008 by MEDICINTEKNIK KB

picon face
This is just getting better and better !!

Sven
-----Ursprungligt meddelande-----
FrŒn: Wagner Lipnharski <RemoveMEwagnerlspamTakeThisOuTEARTHLINK.NET>
Till: PICLISTEraseMEspam.....MITVMA.MIT.EDU <EraseMEPICLISTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Datum: den 7 maj 1999 01:18
€mne: Re: Weird, Wacky, Zany PIC applications


{Quote hidden}

1999\05\08@115019 by MEDICINTEKNIK KB

picon face
OK - here is my Sundial project. Not existing - something for my retirement::

2 photodetectors behind a lens with a tube are mounted on a disk that can rotate horizontally. Functionally you can say it is rotated by a stepper motor; one turn per day (I actually have another Very low-power idŽa in mind). The sun would give equal light to the photodetectors when the lens with tube is aimed towards the sun. When off balance, the steppermotor would give it a nudge to line up again. A dial indicating time is attached to the disk.

At sunset, the stepper motor would swing around to wait for the sunrise again - quickly before a "power-capacitor" discharges (avioding NiCad's). And go beddibyes.
All solar powered - of course :=)


Sven



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Datum: den 7 maj 1999 00:17
€mne: Re: Weird, Wacky, Zany PIC applications


{Quote hidden}

1999\05\11@024140 by : Cassie Carstens

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> OK - here is my Sundial project. Not existing - something for my retirement::
>
> 2 photodetectors behind a lens with a tube are mounted on a disk that can rota
te horizontally. Functionally you can say it is rotated by a stepper motor; one
turn per day (I actually have another Ve
> y low-power idea in mind). The sun would give equal light to the photodetector
s when the lens with tube is aimed towards the sun. When off balance, the steppe
rmotor would give it a nudge to line up
> gain. A dial indicating time is attached to the disk.
>
> At sunset, the stepper motor would swing around to wait for the sunrise again
- quickly before a "power-capacitor" discharges (avioding NiCad's). And go beddi
byes.
> All solar powered - of course :=)

No time during the night ??? This sounds like the solar powered
flash-light. Way to go  :=}
Regards Cassie

1999\05\11@030920 by Michael Rigby-Jones

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       I think you'll find that lack of operation during the night is a
standard "feature" of sundials.....Then again it's not like you're going to
have one in the bedroom.

       Regards

       Mike Rigby-Jones

1999\05\11@041151 by James Cameron

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Michael Rigby-Jones wrote:
> I think you'll find that lack of operation during the night is a
> standard "feature" of sundials ... Then again it's not like you're
> going to have one in the bedroom.

Not such a bad idea.

The PIC would have to supply the artificial sun.  The scaling would have
to change to 24 hours for 180 degrees instead of just 12 hours.  I would
put the sun, a 12V dichroic lamp, on a track in a semicircle around the
bedside sundial.  It would have to whip back to starting point every
day; maybe during a favourite television show when nobody is looking.

At least this way the device will work when it is cloudy or rainy.  And
you won't have to suffer through all these extra calculations for the
tilt of the planet.

The loss of angular resolution might be a problem, but that could be
countered with a digital LED display.

--
James Cameron                                      (KILLspamquozlspamBeGonespamus.netrek.org)

Linux, Firewalls, OpenVMS, Software Engineering, CGI, HTTP, X, C, FORTH,
COBOL, BASIC, DCL, csh, bash, ksh, sh, Electronics, Microcontrollers,
Disability Engineering, Netrek, Bicycles, Pedant, Farming, Home Control,
Remote Area Power, Greek Scholar, Tenor Vocalist, Church Sound, Husband.

"Specialisation is for insects." -- Robert Heinlein.

1999\05\11@051550 by Quentin

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Hmmm

What about the pic measures the time from sun rise to sun set and work
out the difference between day and night.
Then, you still have 12 hours over 180 degrees, say from 6AM to 6PM (or
what ever your average sunrise time is) on  a "day" scale, and 6PM to
6AM on a "night" scale.

At the end of the day, the dial changes direction and runs backwards
through the night, speed based on what was measured, so it will be ready
on the 6AM position the next morning.

Also, by measuring time through the day, any changes due to seasons can
be auto accounted for.
And if it just so happens that it is cloudy that day, the PIC will use
the measurement of the previous day.

Quentin



James Cameron wrote:

{Quote hidden}

1999\05\11@055606 by Michael Rigby-Jones

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{Quote hidden}

       Excellent, can we make it solar powered as well? <g> Hmm...how about
the light staying fixed and the sundial rotating?  At least you could use it
as a bedside lamp then, without having to move your bed halfway through a
good book ....

       Mike Rigby-Jones

1999\05\11@060949 by Caisson

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> Van: : Cassie Carstens <spamBeGoneeng1spamKILLspamTBH.WCAPE.GOV.ZA>
> Aan: .....PICLISTspam_OUTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Onderwerp: Re: SV:      Re: Weird, Wacky, Zany PIC applications
> Datum: dinsdag 11 mei 1999 10:54
>
> > OK - here is my Sundial project. Not existing - something for my
retirement::

<Snip>

> No time during the night ??? This sounds like the solar powered
> flash-light. Way to go  :=}
> Regards Cassie

Ofcourse not during the night.  Is dark then.  So you could not see the
dial anyway. And the Solar-powered flash-light does not help either :-)

Greetz,
 Rudy Wieser

1999\05\11@180911 by Walter Lenk

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On Tue, 4 May 1999 Scott Fink wrote :
>  I am putting together a short talk about Zany applications and hoped
>  that you folks could help me out.  If YOU have used a PIC in any
>  highly cool, or weird application, and I would be allowed to talk
>  about in public (i.e. no NDA) and would like your 15 minutes of fame,
>  please let me know all about your app! ..........


My Wacky, Zany PIC application is the control and timing mechanism for
Arthur Ganson's sculpture "Machine with Wishbone", currently being
exhibited at the MIT museum (Arthur is an artist-in-residence at MIT). You
can see it at :

<http://web.mit.edu/afs/athena.mit.edu/org/m/museum/exhibits/ganson.html>

About this piece, David Simms writes in the Smithsonian Magazine : "Kids
love 'Machine with Wishbone' because it's funny, odd and ingenious. Many
adults, on the other hand, see pathos and tragedy as the enslaved little
bone drags the clanking contraption behind it. Rube Goldberg meets
Jean-Paul Sartre."

Some details : The device uses a PIC 16C57 that reads 2 optical switches, 2
reed switches, 2 test switches, and then controls 2 solenoids, 3 motors, a
single digit mode display, and a beeper.  The control circuit's purpose is
to pace the wishbone man along its track, to sequence the turntables on
either end, and to shut the device off if a preset time for any part of the
sequence has been exceeded.  The piece was originally designed with relay
and time-delay logic, but Arthur needed something more reliable when he
installed it in the permanent exhibit at the MIT museum.  This incarnation
has been it, so far.  Two of these have been built.

I hope that you find it as amusing as I did when I was working on it.

Walter Lenk          Cambridge, MA        617-547-7781

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