Searching \ for 'Weather station' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=weather+station
Search entire site for: 'Weather station'.

Truncated match.
PICList Thread
'Weather station'
1998\02\08@164119 by Jim Pruitt

flavicon
face
       Can someone direct me to a PIC (or other sbc) project for a complete wea
ther
station?  I have been looking but have not had much luck.
       If not, can someone direct me to reflectors for other single board compu
ters?
       Thank you.

       Jim Pruitt

1998\02\08@184942 by Michael S. Hagberg

flavicon
face
i got a flyer from Radio Shack, even they have a weather station listed. I
think the complete setup was about $299 USD. There is also an ad in Circuit
Cellar of a company that sells the sensors. email or post a message if you
want the name and i will look it up.

michael


-----Original Message-----
From: Jim Pruitt <spam_OUTamburchTakeThisOuTspamONEWORLD.OWT.COM>
To: .....PICLISTKILLspamspam@spam@MITVMA.MIT.EDU <PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Date: Sunday, February 08, 1998 3:41 PM
Subject: Weather station


>        Can someone direct me to a PIC (or other sbc) project for a
complete weather
> station?  I have been looking but have not had much luck.
>        If not, can someone direct me to reflectors for other single board
computers?
>        Thank you.
>
>        Jim Pruitt
>

1998\02\09@074813 by verhage

flavicon
face
> i got a flyer from Radio Shack, even they have a weather station listed. I
> think the complete setup was about $299 USD.

Caution, IIRC the data stream form this station is proprietary.  You
may not be able to do any processing with a PIC.  Also, their
software doesn't save data for a year or years.

Lloyd

1998\02\09@130405 by Mark Griebel

picon face
>        Can someone direct me to a PIC (or other sbc) project for a
> complete weather
>  station?  I have been looking but have not had much luck.
>        If not, can someone direct me to reflectors for other single
board
> computers?
>         Thank you.
>
>        Jim Pruitt
>
>
Try www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Pines/7957/mainpage.html
-mark-
_________________________________________________________
DO YOU YAHOO!?
Get your free @yahoo.com address at http://mail.yahoo.com

1998\02\09@132820 by Tom Handley

picon face
At 04:41 PM 2/8/98 -0500, you wrote:
>        Can someone direct me to a PIC (or other sbc) project for a
complete weather
> station?  I have been looking but have not had much luck.
>        If not, can someone direct me to reflectors for other single board
computers?
>        Thank you.
>
>        Jim Pruitt

  Jim, I've designed a 16C74-based weather station. I've added some DIY
(Do It Yourself) and commercial references at the end of this message.
First, I only know of one complete DIY weather station project and that was
back in 93 and is out of date given what you can do now days. I strongly
recommend you buy a good commercial wind sensor and rain gauge. Though I
designed my own outdoor temperature and humidity sensors, I would also
recommend a commercial integrated sensor but they are expensive ($100+). The
main problem I've had was shielding the humidity sensor from ambient light.
These sensors not only provide temperature and humidity but they are also
required to calculate Wind Chill, Dew Point, and Heat Index. My system works
very well but a combined commercial sensor is easier to mount and eliminates
the packaging `hassle'...

  I started designing my system over 2 years ago and the work is still in
progress... The hardware has been running for over a year and tracks the
local (Portland, OR PDX) National Weather Service very closely. I've had the
PC interface up for around 5 months. The wind sensor is the weak point...
When I went into this, Davis Instruments was reluctant to sell me their wind
sensor. I understand that this has changed. Also, I was unaware of Peet
Brothers at the time. I used a refurbished, 1st generation, Heath sensor.
I would like to update this part to a Davis Instruments or Peet Brothers
sensor. My concern was to find an OEM source. Davis rented time in one of
NASA's wind tunnel to test their sensor... While I'm still considering a
commercial product I'm leaning towards breaking the design into parts and
doing magazine articles as well as public PIC projects. Doing a complete
weather station is too complex for a typical article or simple project.
Also, my system includes energy management functions. If you do decide to
`roll your own' I would be glad to help with hardware issues. I would'nt be
of much help with code as it's part of a complex state machine... The
current capabilities of my station are:

     Temperature (0.1F Resolution).
        Outdoor
        Attic
        Upstairs
        Downstairs (Mounted in the furnace thermostat)
        Basement
        Kitchen (Sensor not connected yet)
     Humidity (1% Resolution, 1 - 100%).
        Outdoor
        Indoor
     Barometric Pressure (0.01 InHg Resolution).
     Rain Gauge (Davis Intruments' Gauge. 0.01").
     Wind (Old Heath... 3 mph sensitivity, 16-point direction resolution).
     LCD Display.
        4 x 20
        Displays all of the above, Wind Chill, Dew Point, Peak Wind Gust,
           and Time. Other display modes for Day-Date, Heat Index,
           High/Low Temperature summary, and A/D Calibration.
     Keypad.
        16 Key
           Calibrate A/D
           Calibrate Barometer
           Clear Rain Count. Maunual Software override.
           Clear Peak Wind Gust. Maunual Software override.
           Reset High/Low Temperatures. Maunual Software override.
           Clear SRAM Data Storage
           Set Clock
     Nonvolatile 512K SRAM/RTCC stores data for up to a year.
     Remote Wind Display (PIC16C84), SPI-style, Optoisolated.
     Parallel bus interface.
     Auxilliary SPI-style Interface.
     PC RS232 Interface.
        Windows 95, 9600 Baud
        Displays current data, downloads historical data, graphs historical
           data with a variety of statistical functions, and more...
     Alarms.
        All sensors. Still need to work on the Keypad/LCD/PC interface
     Energy Management
        Heating zones. Lighting control. Load-shedding, more.
     Security
        This is in work. Like the above, it's low-level structure is in
        place.

  There is more to this. Most data conforms with NOAA's Federal
Meteorlogical Handbook and the World Meteorlogical Organization. I would
like to add METAR reporting format. I have'nt discussed energy management as
that is still in work and unique to a given structure. There are more
features I'd like to add to the base unit and more LCD display options. I'm
in the process of moving the code to the 16C77. This will allow me to finish
the Alarms, Security, and Energy Management interface. I'm also adding
things to the PC side including sunrise/sunset. While that's trivial there
is a lot more to add given the raw data from the base unit. Currently, the
PC side does not support Alarms, Security, or Energy Management. However,
the PC is reduced to a configuration/schedule data base for these
applications. The PIC needs to handle these functions in real-time. Since I
want the base unit to operate autonomously, I also need to improve on the
Keypad/LCD interface for these functions.

  The following are some commercial sources (There are many others but they
are very expensive and/or they have a very small home-market share):

(1) Davis Instruments. They are well established and have systems all over
the world. If you go commercial, I'd recommend them first. Expect to pay
around $500 for a full weather station.

     http://www.davisnet.com

(2) Peet Brothers. I don't have any experience with them but they have a lot
of interesting products and seem to be cheaper than Davis. They are very
open about their data and sensor formats.

     http://www.peetbros.com/index.html#TOP

(3) Radio Shack. This system is made by Oregon Scientific. Their web site
does'nt give much info. This seems to be the best deal for a packaged system
but someone else here mentioned that their data format is proprietary.
Though I'm in Oregon, I have never talked with them as I was unaware of
their products when I designed my system. Do a web search or try:

     http://www.oregonscientific.com (I think that was the link)


  The following are some DIY references:

(1) PIC 16F84-based Wind sensor. Innovative design using 3 cups, one with a
tab. It detects direction by variations in the pulse frequency. You need to
buy a package of templates and a PIC for $27. Complex mechanical
construction. You have to fabricate several parts. Direction resolution is
1.4 degrees. Direction measurement accuracy depends on how accurately the
sensor is made. With careful construction, +/- 5 degrees can be expected.
Speed resolution is .5 knots. You calibrate the wind speed yourself in your
car...

     RealTime Control
     http://www.alphalink.com.au/~derekw/ane/anemain.htm

(2) Electronics Now, Oct/Nov 93. Complete weather station project. Fairly
easy mechanical construction. Original company and parts no longer exist but
most parts are available from the hardware store. Apparently another company
sells kits and an assembled version but even the kit price was `ridiculous'
compared to commercial systems and the original article...

   Electronics Now, Aug 95. Another wind sensor based on the revised Heath
wind sensor which is hard to find. Based on a 8031.

     http://www.gernsback.com (Electronics Now and Popular Electronics)

(3) Circuit Cellar Ink, #32 Mar 93. A video wind sensor. I don't have the
issue in my archives.

   Circuit Cellar Ink, #68 Mar 96. PIC-based wind sensor. Uses Davis
Instruments wind sensor. Includes calibration data (from driving a car)...

     http://www.circuitcellar.com

  - Tom

1998\02\10@055924 by Tom Handley

picon face
  Jim, thanks for posting this link! I've looked at hundreds of sources
and I've never come across this one. It's good to see that Facinating
Electronics is still around and making wind and other sensor kits. I
would recommend anyone looking into a low-cost PIC-based weather station,
first check this link. While my station is an `over-kill' as far as
accuracy and features, this project is very affordable, has reasonable
accuracy, and can be easily expanded.

  - Tom

At 09:04 AM 2/9/98 -0800, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

1998\02\10@093351 by Charles Laforge

picon face
Hi Tom

Out of curiosity... have you tried the solid state wind speed sensor
which appeared in (the latest?) electronics now?  I don't have the mag
here with me but I figure someone must have tried this.  What type of
accracy can one expect?

Your post was very interesting and also very encouraging for anyone
looking to make their own station.

Charles



______________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com

1998\02\10@105815 by Rajnish
flavicon
face
At 05:51 PM 8/2/98 -0600, you wrote:
>i got a flyer from Radio Shack, even they have a weather station listed. I
>think the complete setup was about $299 USD. There is also an ad in Circuit
>Cellar of a company that sells the sensors. email or post a message if you
>want the name and i will look it up.
>
>michael
>


Would be obliged if you can tell me details of supplier for sensors listed
in Circuit Cellar.

Thanks,

Rajnish.

1998\02\10@124307 by Michael S. Hagberg

flavicon
face
it is David Instruments http://www.davisnet.com

michael


-----Original Message-----
From: Rajnish <.....challengersKILLspamspam.....TECHNOLOGIST.COM>
To: EraseMEPICLISTspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTMITVMA.MIT.EDU <PICLISTspamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Date: Tuesday, February 10, 1998 10:00 AM
Subject: Re: Weather station


>At 05:51 PM 8/2/98 -0600, you wrote:
>>i got a flyer from Radio Shack, even they have a weather station listed. I
>>think the complete setup was about $299 USD. There is also an ad in
Circuit
{Quote hidden}

1998\02\10@171746 by Bill Rininger

flavicon
face
I built part of it.  I am just going to use the frequency out and skip the
freq to volt conv.
I am going to put a pic freq counter on it.  I've not got to the point af
calibrating them accuratly yet.
They seem to have a slow reponce time so I'm not sure how it will do with
gusts.

Bill


{Original Message removed}

1998\02\10@192633 by Charles Laforge

picon face
Hello

Please let us (well me anyways) know how this works out.  When I get a
chance I will read the article as it all seems really interesting.  Too
much to do....

Charles

>Date:         Tue, 10 Feb 1998 17:17:30 -0500
>Reply-To:     pic microcontroller discussion list
<@spam@PICLISTKILLspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
>From:         Bill Rininger <KILLspambillrKILLspamspamHAYBURN.COM>
>Subject:      Re: Weather station
>To:           RemoveMEPICLISTTakeThisOuTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
>
>I built part of it.  I am just going to use the frequency out and skip
the
>freq to volt conv.
>I am going to put a pic freq counter on it.  I've not got to the point
af
>calibrating them accuratly yet.
>They seem to have a slow reponce time so I'm not sure how it will do
with
>gusts.
>
>Bill
>
>
>{Original Message removed}

1998\02\11@091036 by Tom Handley

picon face
  Charles, I've looked at the hot-film sensor and others where one
transistor is held at a constant temperature and the other senses
the ambient air. These are variations of a `Hot Wire' sensor. They
are not really suited to the rugged environment of an anemometer in
a weather station. They are normally used to measure air-flow in a
controlled environment (ie: air duct).

  - Tom

At 06:15 AM 2/10/98 PST, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

1998\02\11@220251 by Steve Turner

picon face
Charles Laforge <spamBeGonecjoachimspamBeGonespamHOTMAIL.COM> wrote:

>Out of curiosity... have you tried the solid state wind speed sensor
>which appeared in (the latest?) electronics now?  I don't have the mag
>here with me but I figure someone must have tried this.  What type of
>accracy can one expect?

I have built the device, which is a hot-wire anemometer.  I left
out the digital section, since I'm feeding the output to an ADC
and into a PC.  (Not a PIC, because I don't know how to use PICs.
Why am I on this list?  Because I would eventually like to port
my whole weather station to a PIC based system. so I won't have
to leave a PC running all the time....)

As Bill Rininger mentioned, the device's response time is a
little slow, though I don't know how it compares with a
mechanical cup anemometer in that respect.  I don't have a good
handle on accuracy, since I don't have access to a wind tunnel.
Using the "stick it out of the window of a moving car" method of
calibration ain't as easy as it sounds.  First of all, it's very
difficult to maintain a very constant speed in a typical
automobile (at least *my* automobile).  Any small dips or rises
in the road affect the data noticeably.  Second, automobile
speedos are not made for great precision.  Third, the calibration
method assumes zero ambient wind speed, which simply isn't
realistic most of the time.  All of these factors, and perhaps
others that I haven't recognized, made it very difficult for me
to calibrate the unit to better than +/- 5 mph.

Another slight problem is that the unit, even with the log amp,
does not seem quite linear.  This flaw is potentially easily
dealt with, provided that one can somehow come up with a good
plot of output vs. wind speed.  Back to the wind tunnel.

Another drawback of the hotwire anemometer is that it must be
shielded from rain, snow, direct sunlight, and anything else that
will cause heating or cooling.  The shield must not interfere
with normal airflow.

BTW, I want to thank Tom Handley for his stellar post on PIC
weather stations.

Steve Turner

1998\02\14@044249 by paulb

flavicon
face
Steve Turner wrote:

> Using the "stick it out of the window of a moving car" method of
> calibration ain't as easy as it sounds.

 Hint: You need a separate driver!

> Second, automobile speedos are not made for great precision.

 Quite so; they don't even register below 20k/h (15mph).  I really
*must* build my "car computer".  These seem to have waned in popularity
now, except amongst rally users (maybe even there too?).

 An alternative comes to mind; a cyclist riding in a large circle on a
tether?  Still air and smooth tarmac required of course.  It turns out
that cycle computers appear to use algorithms, quite possibly table
reads, to do the period inversion and are not that accurate either.
Which stymies the other suggestion, that they can be used as a cheap
"car" computer.

> Third, the calibration method assumes zero ambient wind speed, which
> simply isn't realistic most of the time.

 I can tell you there's been a lot of it over here in the last few
days.  It is HOT!

 Cheers,
       Paul B.
(Who has in the past, "fox-hunted" single-handedly; i.e., spun the yagi
whilst driving and watching the meter!)

1998\02\15@072148 by Mike DeMetz

flavicon
face
> > Using the "stick it out of the window of a moving car" method of
> > calibration ain't as easy as it sounds.
>
>   Hint: You need a separate driver!
>
> > Second, automobile speedos are not made for great precision.
>
If you drive fast enough on the highway, a state policeman may give
you a ride. Their speedometers are cailbrated +- 2mph.

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 1998 , 1999 only
- Today
- New search...