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'WOT: (was Re: cats! -Reply)'
1999\09\10@171658 by hmiller

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Dan Tye wrote:
>
> Tesla was the "father" of AC and also, as it happened, Edison's
> assistant during the time Tesla was formulating the use of AC.  Since
> Edison believed strongly in the use and distribution of DC to the
> masses, a rift developed between the two men which would never be
> resolved.  If Edison had had his way, every small neighborhood would
> have had its own DC power generating station (since DC can't be
> transported over distance).  This is the version of history I am
> familiar with anyway....
>
> {Original Message removed}

1999\09\11@095814 by Robert M. McClure

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>For a few years near the turn of the century my hometown in Nebraska
>*did* have a DC generating plant which was a spin-off (pun intended) of
>the water driven grist mill. It furnished power for street and store
>lights plus some homes. 24 VDC, I believe.
>
>Harley L. Miller     spam_OUThmillerTakeThisOuTspamsound.net

DC networks were common a lot longer than the turn of the century.  When
I was in engineering school in 1955 we made a field trip to see the DC
system in Kansas City.  At that time there were still a number of DC
elevators in the downtown area.  KC Power & Light was in the process of
trying to discontinue DC service at that time.  The "generating" plants
were quite modern, having been converted from direct generation of DC
to conversion of AC to DC by means of synchronous converters sometime
about the time of WWI.  Beautiful old machinery.

Bob McClure <.....rmmKILLspamspam@spam@unidot.com>

1999\09\11@114008 by goflo

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DC mains were available in many cities in the 50's.
Small appliances of the post-war era often featured
"ac-dc" motors for compatibility.
BTW, if DC seems archaic, STEAM was available as a
a utility in NYC in the same era...  :)

Regards, Jack


Robert M. McClure wrote:
{Quote hidden}

1999\09\12@004754 by Russell McMahon

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Thermal energy reticulation (steam or hot water) is still an efficient use
of part of the output of power stations and is in use in some parts of the
world. AFAIK in some places hot water is piped 10's of kilometres. Think
about the energy wasted in "cooling towers". At one station in NZ
(geothermal source) the hot waste water is used to raise fresh water
crayfish.

RM



>DC mains were available in many cities in the 50's.
>Small appliances of the post-war era often featured
>"ac-dc" motors for compatibility.
>BTW, if DC seems archaic, STEAM was available as a
>a utility in NYC in the same era...  :)
>
>Regards, Jack

1999\09\13@215028 by Roland Andrag

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> DC mains were available in many cities in the 50's.
> Small appliances of the post-war era often featured
> "ac-dc" motors for compatibility.

Universal motors are still used in hairdryers, handheld drills and many
other applications today...

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