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PICList Thread
'Trying to erase a 16c63/jw'
1997\05\03@191336 by JeffScholz

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Hi folks,
       I have attempted to erase my first jw part. It is a 16c63.
I have placed the window about 2" from a 15w uv-b bulb for about
2 hours. A subsequent read of the device shows that the program is
still there. What am I doing wrong? Do I need a different type of
eraser? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

Jeff

1997\05\03@225910 by Jim Robertson

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At 09:41 PM 5/3/97 +0000, you wrote:
>Hi folks,
>        I have attempted to erase my first jw part. It is a 16c63.
>I have placed the window about 2" from a 15w uv-b bulb for about
>2 hours. A subsequent read of the device shows that the program is
>still there. What am I doing wrong? Do I need a different type of
>eraser? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.
>
>Jeff
>
Jeff,

If the program is still there keep trying. Move the 16C63 closer (very
close) to the UV source and check you have the right sort of UV. I don't
know what you meant when you said UV "bulb" but to us in Australia that
sort of suggests you have a incandescent "black light" and not the sort of
UV we want. Generally UV erasers are clear fluro "tubes" Hey, this might
just be a language thing. It appears "bulb" is commonly used in the USA
when I look at other piclist postings.

Anyway, after 2 hours something should be happening if your UV is good
unless...

If your part completely reads as '0000' then forget it. You have code
protected it and it won't erase.

If you are reading the program back then everything is ok. You just need to
get the UV situation sorted and the part will erase when that is done.

Good luck!

Jim

1997\05\04@030406 by Mike

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At 09:41 PM 3/05/97 +0000, you wrote:
>Hi folks,
>        I have attempted to erase my first jw part. It is a 16c63.
>I have placed the window about 2" from a 15w uv-b bulb for about
>2 hours. A subsequent read of the device shows that the program is
>still there. What am I doing wrong? Do I need a different type of
>eraser? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

Use something to lift it up so its about 5mm from the tube. Leave it there
for at least an hour - then WAIT for it to cool down to room temperature
before plugging it in to a reader or programmer.

Rgds

Mike
Perth, Western Australia

Some say there is no magic but, all things begin with thought then it becomes
academic, then some poor slob works out a practical way to implement all that
theory, this is called Engineering - for most people another form of magic.
                                                                      Massen

1997\05\04@073936 by Mike Smith

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> From: JeffScholz <spam_OUTJScholzTakeThisOuTspamPOSTOFFICE.WORLDNET.ATT.NET>
> To: .....PICLISTKILLspamspam@spam@MITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Subject: Trying to erase a 16c63/jw
> Date: Sunday, 4 May 1997 07:11
>
> Hi folks,
>         I have attempted to erase my first jw part. It is a 16c63.
> I have placed the window about 2" from a 15w uv-b bulb for about
> 2 hours. A subsequent read of the device shows that the program is
> still there. What am I doing wrong? Do I need a different type of
> eraser? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

From reading some stuff on a UV FAQ, I understand that UV-B lamps are
intended for 'effects' type displays, and as such, have a UV filter that
removes the harmful to eye components of the UV spectrum - ie: the ones
that erase PIC's etc.  Try one without the -B suffix.  (If an eraser came
with one of these in it, either the FAQ was wrong || I am confused || the
eraser manufacturer needs a good kick!)

MikeS
<mikesmith_ozspamKILLspamrelaymail.net>

1997\05\05@145940 by Martin McCormick

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       I am pretty sure the type of lamp that works for erasing Eproms
and the Eprom cells in a PIC is a UV-A, not UV-B lamp.  The UV-A bulbs and
tubes (they come both ways), emit a shorter wavelength of light.  They are
also much more dangerous so watch out and don't watch them at all.

       The UV-A lamps actually ionize the air so you may notice an ozone
smell when you open the box after erasing Eproms.  The bulbs are, in fact,
called germicidal lamps and used to be popular in air conditioners and
clothes driers.

Martin McCormick

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