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'Tilt Sensor'
1997\06\08@141038 by Andy Shaw

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Hi has anyone any experience of a low cost
proportional tilt sensor (with say +20..-20 degrees
in a single axis). I would guess that a liquid based
sensor would be the most likely. Anyone know
of anything suitable?

Thanks

Andy

1997\06\08@201439 by Ross McKenzie

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At 19:12 8/06/97 +0100, you wrote:
>Hi has anyone any experience of a low cost
>proportional tilt sensor (with say +20..-20 degrees
>in a single axis). I would guess that a liquid based
>sensor would be the most likely. Anyone know
>of anything suitable?
>
>Thanks
>
>Andy

Hello Andy,

About 20 years ago, I designed and prototyped a 2 axis inclinometer based
upon capacitive techniques to measure level changes of icebergs (I feel
another old timers' story akin to teletypes coming on <g>). Each axis used 2
pcbs separated by about 0.125" with all edges sealed. It was half filled
with kerosene, so as not to freeze; the rest was air. The dielectric
constant of kerosene is much larger than air. Two capacitors were formed by
large areas of copper on each pcb facing each other. These were connected to
CMOS oscillators whose frequencies were sampled and counted. Very good
correlation of counts to degrees and a resolution of better than 0.1 degrees
as I remember.

One capacitor was placed so as to be always covered by the kerosene
irrespective of the inclination and formed the "variable" element of a
reference oscillator which allowed monitoring of the oscillator's transfer
function due to temperature, aging and power supply effects upon the sensor.

The other capacitor was shaped and placed so that the level of the kerosene
varied its capacitance in direct proportion to the change in inclination,
plus and minus. Imagine a right angle triangle sitting on a square whose top
edge coincided with the upper kerosene line when the sensor was level. Too
hard to draw here.

Vector techniques were then used to combine the two axis data to resolve the
orientation and magnitude of the movement from level.

Another approach, but lacking directionality, is to use a ping pong ball
half filled with mercury. The outer top half is then metallised and
electrodes connected to the metalised surface and to the mercury within.
Measure the capacitance again.

The final suggestion; a potentiometer with shaft axis horizontal and a stiff
rod with weight attached. Body of the pot fixed to what you wish to monitor.
Gravity turns the pot and you read the change in resistance.

Ahh, the good old days ....


Regards,

Ross McKenzie
Melbourne Australia

1997\06\09@041058 by Mal Goris

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Andy Shaw writes:
> Hi has anyone any experience of a low cost
> proportional tilt sensor (with say +20..-20 degrees
> in a single axis). I would guess that a liquid based
> sensor would be the most likely. Anyone know
> of anything suitable?

How about using some number of mercury switches?  They are pretty
cheap. You could also use something connected to a strain guage.

Mal Goris
--
http://www.nfra.nl/~mgoris/

1997\06\09@080526 by Micheal Yano

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Just a couple of ideas, levels for construction are now electronic.


At 07:12 PM 6/8/97 +0100, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Thanks.


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1997\06\09@081740 by Vesa Tervo (OH3NWQ)

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> >Hi has anyone any experience of a low cost
> >proportional tilt sensor (with say +20..-20 degrees
> >in a single axis). I would guess that a liquid based
> >sensor would be the most likely. Anyone know
> >of anything suitable?
> >Thanks
> >Andy

How about a pendelum on a potentiometer?

Vesa OH3NWQ

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1997\06\09@083514 by Andy Kunz

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Andy Shaw writes:
> Hi has anyone any experience of a low cost
> proportional tilt sensor (with say +20..-20 degrees
> in a single axis). I would guess that a liquid based
> sensor would be the most likely. Anyone know
> of anything suitable?

Check this place for an application of a tilt sensor I did, the APC-3.

http://www.rcboats.com

Andy


======================================================================
Andy Kunz - Montana Design - 409 S 6th St - Phillipsburg, NJ 08865 USA
             Electronics for Industry & R/C Hobbyists
        "Go fast, turn right, and keep the wet side down!"
======================================================================


'Tilt sensor'
1998\01\22@132455 by miked
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The new Maxim Engineering Journal (#29) has a Design Showcase for
a Adjustment-free inclinometer using a PIC16C54,LCD,MAX147(a/d) and
sensor. The sensor is SPECTRON L-211 FREDRICKS 0725-5006. It references
a related article in the 4/24/97 issue of EDN.

1998\01\22@141843 by Mwa.Dekkers

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Mike DeMetz wrote:
>
> The new Maxim Engineering Journal (#29) has a Design Showcase for
> a Adjustment-free inclinometer using a PIC16C54,LCD,MAX147(a/d) and
> sensor. The sensor is SPECTRON L-211 FREDRICKS 0725-5006. It references
> a related article in the 4/24/97 issue of EDN.

I've got a few questions about this interesting message;

1. Is Maxim Engineering Journal for sale in Europe (holland).
2. Is inclinometer the same as altitude-meter.
3. What's EDN

Max Dekkers

1998\01\22@151712 by Bob Blick

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> I've got a few questions about this interesting message;
>
> 1. Is Maxim Engineering Journal for sale in Europe (holland).
> 2. Is inclinometer the same as altitude-meter.
> 3. What's EDN

Hi Max,

Maxim Engineering Journal is a sales newsletter. Maxim sends it out for
free, probably to Holland. Check http://www.maxim-ic.com/

An inclinometer measures tilt angle from level. Not altitude.

EDN is the best "free" electronics magazine. The "Design Ideas" from
readers is wonderful. Not free in Holland. The web site is at
http://www.ednmag.com/ There are code and some articles on the web site.

Cheers,

Bob


'Tilt sensor'
1998\07\11@091245 by miked
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I'm using the ADXL202 and this baby is about $50 CAN a piece!
Anything
> around that does X and Y perhaps with less sensitivity and
resolution
> for the $10 you speak of?
>
> Craig Lee
>
These guys make what you want tilt senors for car alarms. Don't
know about price.
http://idt.net/~aosi/


'Tilt sensor'
1999\01\14@123359 by Michel Tremblay
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part 0 2779 bytes content-type:text/plain (decoded quoted-printable)

------ 1999\01\14@130238 by Andy Kunz
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>Do you guys know about a tilt sensor I could use in my project ??? I am
>
>looking for a device that would either return a bynary or analog value
>
>proportionnal to it's tilt level.
>
>I looked in Digi-Key, Marshall and NuHorizon web site without success.
>
>Could I use a fluxgate device like the Vector 2 Compass module in the
>
>vertical axis if I use the raw magnetometer output???

Michael,

Check out the Analog Devices ADXL202EB.  This is an eval board which would
do you a great service.

If you are price-oriented, ask skipspamspam_OUTrcboats.com about buying his sensor.

Andy



  \-----------------/
   \     /---\     /
    \    |   |    /          Andy Kunz
     \   /---\   /           Montana Design
/---------+   +---------\     http://www.montanadesign.com
| /  |----|___|----|  \ |
\/___|      *      |___\/     Go fast, turn right,
                              and keep the wet side down!

1999\01\14@135643 by Reginald Neale

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Try:

http://www.frederickscom.com
http://idt.net/~aosi/Dx.htm
http://www.spectronsensors.com

Reg Neale

>Do you guys know about a tilt sensor I could use in my project ??? I am
>looking for a device that would either return a bynary or analog value
>proportionnal to it's tilt level.

1999\01\14@203808 by Steve Tomes

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Try a linear hall sensor...they work great and are easy to implement
You get a variable voltage out and can convert to a digital signal.
Allegro hasd excellent applicatiion notes on the subject...STEVE T

1999\01\14@230748 by steve

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> Check out the Analog Devices ADXL202EB.  This is an eval board which would
> do you a great service.

If that's the eval board for the ADXL05, I believe it has been
discontinued. Of course the ADXL05 will make a very good tilt sensor
on its own (if you don't mind a sine function).

Steve.

======================================================
Steve Baldwin                Electronic Product Design
TLA Microsystems Ltd         Microcontroller Specialists
PO Box 15-680, New Lynn      http://www.tla.co.nz
Auckland, New Zealand        ph  +64 9 820-2221
email: @spam@stevebKILLspamspamtla.co.nz      fax +64 9 820-1929
======================================================

1999\01\14@235428 by retorius Johan * Spoornet

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Try the ADXL 202 from analog devices.

{Quote hidden}

1999\01\15@030845 by Jochen Feldhaar

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Hi,

there is an integrated circuit from Analog Devices called the AD202XL,
which is a silicon implemented gravity sensor with great sensitivity. It
can be used as a precision tilt sensor. Will cost about 10 Dollars each.
An israeli-based compamy called ERM has a tilt sensor on offer called
T_Jack 2001, and inside is ...listen well... a PIC 12C508!!!
So this is a good application for a PIC. See the AD webpage for details on
this cutie.

Greetings

Jochen Feldhaar
DH6FAZ
TakeThisOuTjfEraseMEspamspam_OUTdetektor.de

1999\01\15@051538 by Tom Handley

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  Michel, others mentioned the Analog Devices ADXL202. This is a
+/-2G, 2-axis, device providing a TTL-level duty cycle output. They
have a reference design based on a PIC including the code. They also
have a little evaluation board which is what I have. For more info:

     http://www.analog.com/imems/

  - Tom

At 12:21 PM 1/14/99 -0500, Michel Tremblay wrote:
[MIME stuff deleted]
{Quote hidden}

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