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'TCP/IP'
1998\06\15@122014 by Alessandro Zummo

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Anyone knows where to get a TCP/IP stack with SLIP/PPP/other interface
for the PIC micros?
I would like to connect my stereo to my LAN...8-)

--

  - *Alex* -

 http://freepage.logicom.it/azummo/

1998\06\15@130713 by WF AUTOMACAO

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Alessandro Zummo wrote:
>
>  Anyone knows where to get a TCP/IP stack with SLIP/PPP/other interface
>  for the PIC micros?
>  I would like to connect my stereo to my LAN...8-)
>
> --
>
>    - *Alex* -
>
>   http://freepage.logicom.it/azummo/

I have heard for 8051, 80196 and something for Motorola, but for PIC...

Miguel.

1998\06\15@212445 by Dave Miga

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Alessandro Zummo wrote:
>
>  Anyone knows where to get a TCP/IP stack with SLIP/PPP/other
> interface
>  for the PIC micros?
>  I would like to connect my stereo to my LAN...8-)
>
> --
>
>    - *Alex* -
>
>   http://freepage.logicom.it/azummo/

(?)

1998\06\16@073053 by Douglas Braun

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Of course, you need an Ethernet controller (unless you use SLIP, etc).
Does anyone know what's the cheapest, simplest ethernet controller
chipset out there?  Those cheap network printer controller boxes
must have something simple...

Are there any reasonable cheap single-board computers with ethernet built
in?
I have ideas for a couple of projects where a little box needs to drive
some
relays, etc., and in turn be driven thru Ethernet from "real" PC or Unix
boxes.
How about getting one of those cheap printer controller boxes and replacing
the
EPROM code?

Doug Braun

----------
> Alessandro Zummo wrote:
> >
> >  Anyone knows where to get a TCP/IP stack with SLIP/PPP/other interface
> >  for the PIC micros?
> >  I would like to connect my stereo to my LAN...8-)

1998\06\16@073116 by Alessandro Zummo

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Il 15-Giu-98, Dave Miga scrisse:


>>  Anyone knows where to get a TCP/IP stack with SLIP/PPP/other
>> interface
>>  for the PIC micros?
>>  I would like to connect my stereo to my LAN...8-)

> (?)

No, i'm not mad... 8-)

--

  - *Alex* -

 http://freepage.logicom.it/azummo/

1998\06\16@125923 by anick

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Have you considered a inexpensive RS-232 -> Ethernet box?

-----Original Message-----
From: Douglas Braun <spam_OUTdougbertTakeThisOuTspamOTENET.GR>
To: .....PICLISTKILLspamspam@spam@MITVMA.MIT.EDU <PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Date: Tuesday, June 16, 1998 7:31 AM
Subject: Re: TCP/IP


{Quote hidden}

1998\06\16@142056 by Sean Breheny

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On Tue, 16 Jun 1998, anick wrote:

> Have you considered a inexpensive RS-232 -> Ethernet box?
>

Motorola makes a processor intended for embedded networking called the
68302. There is a version available with built-in ethernet capability,
called the 68EN302. The '302 is actually considered a bit outdated,
because they have since introduced the QUICC and powerQUICC, cousins of
the '302, but I'm not sure if they have built-in eithernet. Basically,
the '302 is a 68000 with bus controller and a RISC communications
microcontroller built-in to run code to create some virtual peripherals
(such as an HDLC controller).

Good luck,

Sean


> {Original Message removed}

1998\06\16@171653 by Alessandro Zummo

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Il 16-Giu-98, anick scrisse:


> Check out http://www.acola.com
>>
>> Have you considered a inexpensive RS-232 -> Ethernet box?

they're not so cheap... 1000DM is the price of the cheapes one!
For that price i will develop my own pic based
implementation :-)

--

  - *Alex* -

 http://freepage.logicom.it/azummo/

1998\06\16@213825 by Dennis Plunkett

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At 01:18 PM 16/06/98 -0400, you wrote:
>On Tue, 16 Jun 1998, anick wrote:
>
>> Have you considered a inexpensive RS-232 -> Ethernet box?
>>
>
>Motorola makes a processor intended for embedded networking called the
>68302. There is a version available with built-in ethernet capability,
>called the 68EN302. The '302 is actually considered a bit outdated,
>because they have since introduced the QUICC and powerQUICC, cousins of
>the '302, but I'm not sure if they have built-in eithernet. Basically,
>the '302 is a 68000 with bus controller and a RISC communications
>microcontroller built-in to run code to create some virtual peripherals
>(such as an HDLC controller).
>
>Good luck,
>
>Sean
>
>
>> {Original Message removed}

1998\06\17@032420 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
the QUICC and PowerQUICC do have an ethernet port (or perhaps "are available
in a version that has an ethernet port".)  I think it goes sortof along the
lines of having support for CSMA/CD and an external interface for an ethernet
manchester encoder/collision-detect/etc.

I've been thinking along (my) work related lines - just what would constitute
a reasonable "network gateway" for embedded gizmos?  Certainly some of this
is done by current "terminal server" products - boxes that will turn an rs232
async data stream into tcp packets and vis versa.  However, perhaps it is
time to go further than that.  How about something with enough
programmability to generate SNMP or web pages based on async data that has
arrived through a rs232 port.  More explicit control over packetization?
ability to generate UDP traffic, multicasts, etc?  What cost-per-port is
reasonable?

As for doing this sort of thing NOW...  Used equipment that is a generation
or so out-of-date is available for pretty low prices.  New equipment is
rather cost-constrained by the baggage that now goes with a network-aware
box (and we have more baggage than most, and are therefore more expensive :-)
The CHEAPEST way to do this probably involves buying 2400bps (or slower)
modems for your gizmo, subscribing to an online service of appropriate type
($30/month?) and having your gizmo dial up, transact appropriately, and hang
up again.  (You can leveage the online service to read this list :-)
Don't laugh - how do you think your credit card gets approved from locations
ranging from street fairs (on portable phones) to unattended gasoline pumps.

BillW
cisco

1998\06\18@135455 by Wim E. van Bemmel

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Hello,

the cheapest solution is finding a PC, adding a cheap Ethernet card and connect
that serial to the PIC. Then get a TCP/IP stack...
You'll be in business for about $100.
But maybe this is not what you are looking for, a bit bulky ...


Douglas Braun wrote:

{Quote hidden}

--
 Regards,

 ------------------------------------------------------------------
 Wim E. van Bemmel
 No Unsollicited Commercial .....bemspanKILLspamspam.....xs4all.nl
 Life is about Interfacing ....
 ------------------------------------------------------------------

1998\06\18@190018 by WF AUTOMACAO

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Wim E. van Bemmel wrote:
>
> Hello,
>
> the cheapest solution is finding a PC, adding a cheap Ethernet card and connec
t
> that serial to the PIC. Then get a TCP/IP stack...
> You'll be in business for about $100.
> But maybe this is not what you are looking for, a bit bulky ...

This is a justification that i give in my master article, too!

MAW

1998\06\19@140331 by John Scott

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It sounds like you need to define what you want this 'TCP/IP stack" to do.

If I remember correctly the IP Appliance in Circuit Cellar just sent one type
of packet with different data in the data field.  That hardly qualifies as a
'IP Stack' in my opinion.  If that is all you need to do, then get a copy of
that code and you are done.

However if you want to send and receive data as a real IP device, you will need
much more code.  You will need to do whatever it is you device is designed to
do, PLUS you will need to listen to the IP interface.  You will need buffers to
receive the data from the IP interface.  You will need buffers to build your
outgoing packets in.  and you will need to do all this fast enough to keep up
the data rate on you IP interface.

Most of this is not too hard if you know how IP works, but if you only have 100
bytes of RAM it will be VERY, VERY, VERY hard to get it to work.

Once again I feel I must state that this all depends on what you want your IP
stack to do.  The Circuit Cellar project has a VERY narrow focus, and they
could write code to do only a very small part of the IP stack that fit their
purpose.

-John Scott
EraseMEkd4vhgspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTradio.org

1998\06\19@150936 by Cesnik, Jeff

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Could someone point me to the issue of Circuit Cellar that outlines this
project?  Sounds very interesting...

Thanks.


{Original Message removed}


'TCP/IP'
1999\01\06@182137 by Alessandro Zummo
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Here's a great link about Ethernet and TCP/Ip over
a PIC:

http://www.vermontlife.com/gary/

--

  - *Alex* -

 http://freepage.logicom.it/azummo/


'TCP/IP'
1999\08\16@152557 by Fansler, David
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In the July 1999 issue of "Embedded Systems Development", there was a small
add for a "Low-Power Chip Adds Internet Functionality" by Seiko Instruments
USA, Inc.  (http://www.seiko-usa-ecd.com <http://www.seiko-usa-ecd.com>
<http://www.seiko-usa-ecd.com <http://www.seiko-usa-ecd.com> > )
Unfortunately the web site did not provide any information.  According to
the release:
"the iChip S7600A TCP/IP Protocol Stack allows Web browsing, email, and
networking to be added to consumer or commercial devices easily and
inexpensively.  It permits users to access the Internet, or any network that
utilizes the TCP/IP protocol, using their PDAs, organizers, cell phones, or
even pagers.  Adding Internet functionality to these types of devices is
possible by simply selecting any other pre-defined component, such as a
resistor or controller.  Running at a speed of 256kHz, the iChip consumes
less than 3 mW in typical operation.  It is available currently at a cost of
$8 in 1000-unit quantities."
A picture shows the chip to be about 1/4th the size of a stamp and  have 12
pins per side (surface mount).

David V. Fansler
Network Administrator
AutoCyte, Inc.
336-222-9707 Ext. 261
dfanslerspamspam_OUTautocyte.com <@spam@dfanslerKILLspamspamautocyte.com>
Now Showing! http://www.mindspring.com\~dfansler\
<http://www.mindspring.com\~dfansler\>   Updated July 13, 1999

1999\08\16@222828 by John A. Craft

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What about this stuff from CNN......

http://www-ccs.cs.umass.edu/~shri/iPic.html


John A. Craft                           (601)689-8100 Voice
Vice President, Sr. Analyst             (601)689-8130 Fax
Nation Computer Services, Inc.  http://www.ncs-ssc.com
MSAAP Bldg 9110                 KILLspamcraftKILLspamspamncs-ssc.com
Stennis Space Center, MS  39529

1999\08\17@010717 by tekphobia

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Fansler, David wrote:

> In the July 1999 issue of "Embedded Systems Development", there was a
small
> add for a "Low-Power Chip Adds Internet Functionality" by Seiko
Instruments
> USA, Inc.  (http://www.seiko-usa-ecd.com <http://www.seiko-usa-ecd.com>
> <http://www.seiko-usa-ecd.com <http://www.seiko-usa-ecd.com> > )
> Unfortunately the web site did not provide any information.  According
to
> the release:
> "the iChip S7600A TCP/IP Protocol Stack allows Web browsing, email,
and
> networking to be added to consumer or commercial devices easily and
> inexpensively.  It permits users to access the Internet, or any
network that
> utilizes the TCP/IP protocol, using their PDAs, organizers, cell
phones, or
> even pagers.  Adding Internet functionality to these types of devices
is
> possible by simply selecting any other pre-defined component, such as
a
> resistor or controller.  Running at a speed of 256kHz, the iChip
consumes
> less than 3 mW in typical operation.  It is available currently at a
cost of
> $8 in 1000-unit quantities."
> A picture shows the chip to be about 1/4th the size of a stamp and
have 12
> pins per side (surface mount).
>
> David V. Fansler
> Network Administrator
> AutoCyte, Inc.
> 336-222-9707 Ext. 261
> RemoveMEdfanslerTakeThisOuTspamautocyte.com <spamBeGonedfanslerspamBeGonespamautocyte.com>
> Now Showing! http://www.mindspring.com\~dfansler\
> <http://www.mindspring.com\~dfansler\>   Updated July 13, 1999

You might wanna fix your sig. Change those backslashes to
FORWARDslashes. =)

Tim Hamel

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