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PICList Thread
'Still new and need help'
1998\10\12@234416 by Brian Gracia

picon face
Hi All,

I have been reading a lot about pics, and I am going to program my first
one soon.  I had to earn the money to buy all of the parts I want to work
with.  With what I make, I think I should give up this hobby.  Fishing is
cheaper and where I live, we eat the bait (shrimp) if we don't catch anything.

Anyway, I have been following the stamp articles in Nuts & Volts.  I like
the way they are taking a chip, interfacing it to a stamp, and showing you
how to code for it.  Since I have been reading a lot on pic chips, I do not
see this trend.  Why, when someone writes a book about a subject such as
pic programming, do they assume you can suck up the programming info from
their book and the data sheets and become a master programmer in just a few
pages?  Why can't they take and go through and set up some simple led
circuits, and chip circuits and show you how to code for them.  I like the
projects they present, but I am not interested in building them, I am
interested in learning how to program a pic.

I would like to see this:

       1. A simple LED circuit.
       2. A more complex 8 LED circuit.  Make em dance and such.
       3. Hook one or two switches up and program some patterens.  When a switc
h
is pressed, make em dance a certain way.
       4. Read in from a parallel to serial chip several switches and display a
status in LEDs out on a serial to parallel chip.

This is the way some people learn to tackle hard subjects like asm.
programming.  I could get a C or PBasic complier, but I want to get used to
programming in asm for pics.

Thanks For the Ears,

Brian

1998\10\13@000509 by James Cameron

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Brian Gracia wrote:
> Thanks For the Ears,

It's a pleasure ... but perhaps the solution is for you to write this
text and publish it?  Those of us higher up often can't see down that
far ... and I'm below many here.  If, as you learn, you take note of
what you needed, you have a good source for a book that will work for
others like you.

Some people can learn by following a book ... I'm one who can't.  I need
the data sheet in front of me, and I need to understand every nut and
bolt before I can put them together to make something.

Also, in my opinion this use of these "Stamps" isn't for me, because I'm
not programming a PIC, I'm using someone else's program to program it.
Avoiding stamps has reduced the material cost of my PIC hobby.

--
James Cameron                                    (spam_OUTcameronTakeThisOuTspamstl.dec.com)
Digital Equipment Corporation (Australia) Pty. Ltd. A.C.N. 000 446 800

1998\10\13@105844 by Dave Johnson

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>Why can't they take and go through and set up some simple led
>circuits, and chip circuits and show you how to code for them.
Have you looked at Myke Predko's book "Programming and Customizing the
PIC Microcontroller? He has, as first hardware projects, just this sort
of thing (turning an led on, blinking it, etc.). The book could *really*
use a decent technical editor, it's full of typos and redundancies (I've
come to expect this kind of thing from TAB books anyway) but nevertheless
I found it quite helpful. I already had some (long ago) experience with
asm programming and electronics, so maybe for an absolute beginner it
wouldn't be as helpful, especially because if you don't know what you're
reading it's hard to detect those typos, but it would be worth a look.
Easy PIC'n (I think I have that title right) is apparently another great
one for absolute beginners, though I haven't seen it so I don't know what
kinds of projects they start with.

Hope this is helpful.

Dave Johnson

1998\10\13@190911 by Tony Nixon

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picon face
Brian Gracia wrote:
>
> Hi All,
>
> I have been reading a lot about pics, and I am going to program my first

Hi Brian,

Have a look at the web site below. You will learn in with fun
interactive interactive lessons, and you can interface to the PIC with
'virtual electronics' and experiment to your hearts content.

--
Best regards

Tony

Multimedia 16F84 Beginners PIC Tools.
**New Improved PicNPost**

http://www.picnpoke.com
Email .....picnpokeKILLspamspam@spam@cdi.com.au

1998\10\14@114259 by David Benson

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Hi Brian,

Regarding your post to the PICLIST:

> Why, when someone writes a book about a subject such as
>pic programming, do they assume you can suck up the programming info from
>their book and the data sheets and become a master programmer in just a few
>pages?

Great question!

{Quote hidden}

This is what we have done in our two books - Easy PIC'n and PIC'n Up The
Pace.  The material is presented in a crawl, then walk, then run sequence.
There are no "projects" as such, but there are lots of experiments -
circuits with the code to exercise them.

The table of contents for both books is on our website http://www.sq-1.com.

Have fun PIC'n!

David Benson


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Square 1 Electronics
P.O. Box 501
Kelseyville, CA 95451 USA
Voice (707) 279-8881
Fax (707) 279-8883
E-mail sqonespamKILLspampacific.net
http://www.sq-1.com

1998\10\14@121358 by Bob Blick
face
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> > Why, when someone writes a book about a subject such as
> >pic programming, do they assume you can suck up the programming info from
> >their book and the data sheets and become a master programmer in just a few
> >pages?

Because it's hard to write a good beginner's book. Easy PIC'n is the best
beginner's book, you'll gobble it up and want the second one, PIC'n' up
the Pace, in just a few days. They both skip over the hard stuff you don't
need to know at the beginning, and concentrate on the easy, productive
things you can do right away. Then you'll want to get Programming and
Customizing the PIC Microcontroller, which is full of details and
projects, but not a beginner's book.

Cheers,
Bob

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