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'Soldering TQFP packages'
2009\01\01@234222 by Larry Bradley

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Olin mentioned in a recent post that soldering TQFP packages to an adapter isn't too hard.

There are a bunch of chips, in SOIC and TQFP that I'd like to be able to use in my breadboarding. I can get the little adapter boards that convert to SIP or DIP locally.

Tips on soldering these things, please? I have a heat-controlled Weller soldering iron, with a fine tip.

Thanks

Larry

2009\01\01@234949 by solarwind

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On Thu, Jan 1, 2009 at 11:41 PM, Larry Bradley <spam_OUTlarry.bradleyTakeThisOuTspamncf.ca> wrote:
> Olin mentioned in a recent post that soldering TQFP packages to an adapter isn't too hard.
>
> There are a bunch of chips, in SOIC and TQFP that I'd like to be able to use in my breadboarding. I can get the little adapter boards that convert to SIP or DIP locally.
>
> Tips on soldering these things, please? I have a heat-controlled Weller soldering iron, with a fine tip.
>
> Thanks
>
> Larry

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3NN7UGWYmBY
--
solarwind

2009\01\01@235923 by Tony Vandiver

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Hi Larry,

   1) Use a microscope (10X is enough for most jobs - it can be done
without it if your eyes are great, but plan on checking for shorts
between every pin if you can't see what you're doing esp if pitch is <=
0.8mm).
   2) Use a 0.015" diameter solder (I have never been able to find
anything smaller that's easy to get).
   3) Using just the plating solder on the pads, tack a single pin of
the part to the pad on opposite corners with the iron and make sure all
pins line up before you solder any more.
 
   Then just have at all the pins - after a couple of rows, you'll get
the hang of it.  If pins short together, use a fine wick to remove solder.

Regards,

Tony

 

Larry Bradley wrote:
> Olin mentioned in a recent post that soldering TQFP packages to an adapter isn't too hard.
>  
> There are a bunch of chips, in SOIC and TQFP that I'd like to be able to use in my breadboarding. I can get the little adapter boards that convert to SIP or DIP locally.
>  
> Tips on soldering these things, please? I have a heat-controlled Weller soldering iron, with a fine tip.
>  
> Thanks
>  
> Larry
>  

2009\01\02@040828 by Peter Loron

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www.curiousinventor.com/guides/Surface_Mount_Soldering/QFP

Alternately, put down some flux and solder paste on the pads. Quickest  
way is to put a bead across the row of pads. Use a hot air gun or your  
soldering iron to heat all the leads. The solder will mostly wick  
under the leads and pads. For the spots where there is extra, use a  
bit of solder wick to draw the excess out.

-Pete

On Jan 1, 2009, at 8:41 PM, Larry Bradley wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> --

2009\01\02@112140 by Jonathan Hallameyer

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> There are a bunch of chips, in SOIC and TQFP that I'd like to be able to use in my breadboarding. I can get the little adapter boards that convert to SIP or DIP locally.
>
> Tips on soldering these things, please? I have a heat-controlled Weller soldering iron, with a fine tip.

SOIC is very doable by hand and with minimal to no magnification, just
tack one corner, to a pretinned pad, tack the opposite and work down
the rest of the pins, alternating sides to keep from overheating.

TQFP, I would suggest loading a solderwick with solder, dragging it
over the pads with the iron on top of it to tin it (extra flux will be
needed) put the chip down, line it up, tack the corners with the
tinning. Add a good bit of flux, and you can use the tinned solder
wick and iron again to solder all the leads.

Inspect carefully to make sure no little strands fell off the wick and
are shorting out a bunch of leads.

--
Jonathan Hallameyer

2009\01\02@125121 by M.L.

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On Fri, Jan 2, 2009 at 11:21 AM, Jonathan Hallameyer <.....jmhtauKILLspamspam@spam@gmail.com> wrote:
>> There are a bunch of chips, in SOIC and TQFP that I'd like to be able to use in my breadboarding. I can get the little adapter boards that convert to SIP or DIP locally.
>>
>> Tips on soldering these things, please? I have a heat-controlled Weller soldering iron, with a fine tip.
>
> SOIC is very doable by hand and with minimal to no magnification, just
> tack one corner, to a pretinned pad, tack the opposite and work down
> the rest of the pins, alternating sides to keep from overheating.
>
> TQFP, I would suggest loading a solderwick with solder, dragging it
> over the pads with the iron on top of it to tin it (extra flux will be
> needed) put the chip down, line it up, tack the corners with the
> tinning. Add a good bit of flux, and you can use the tinned solder
> wick and iron again to solder all the leads.
>

If you get really good at this you can do it without solder wick. Look
up "vertical drag technique" on youtube.
-
ML

2009\01\02@131206 by Jonathan Hallameyer

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>
> If you get really good at this you can do it without solder wick. Look
> up "vertical drag technique" on youtube.
Drag soldering works well with horseshoe/gullwing/whatever the mfr
calls them tips.  I have some on order for the irons at work, I'm
hoping they work well.

--
Jonathan Hallameyer

2009\01\02@133525 by M.L.

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On Fri, Jan 2, 2009 at 1:11 PM, Jonathan Hallameyer <jmhtauspamKILLspamgmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> If you get really good at this you can do it without solder wick. Look
>> up "vertical drag technique" on youtube.
> Drag soldering works well with horseshoe/gullwing/whatever the mfr
> calls them tips.  I have some on order for the irons at work, I'm
> hoping they work well.
>
> --
> Jonathan Hallameyer

I've had marginal success doing this. I think the key is probably
using the right tip (as you say) and lots of flux.

-
ML

2009\01\02@144514 by Picbits Sales

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>> TQFP, I would suggest loading a solderwick with solder, dragging it
>> over the pads with the iron on top of it to tin it (extra flux will be
>> needed) put the chip down, line it up, tack the corners with the
>> tinning. Add a good bit of flux, and you can use the tinned solder
>> wick and iron again to solder all the leads.
>>
>
> If you get really good at this you can do it without solder wick. Look
> up "vertical drag technique" on youtube.
> -
> ML

I actually tried this for the first time ever a couple of weeks ago and it
worked very well on my SOIC part.

Dom

2009\01\03@134409 by John Day

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At 01:35 PM 1/2/2009, you wrote:
>On Fri, Jan 2, 2009 at 1:11 PM, Jonathan Hallameyer <.....jmhtauKILLspamspam.....gmail.com> wrote:
> >>
> >> If you get really good at this you can do it without solder wick. Look
> >> up "vertical drag technique" on youtube.
> > Drag soldering works well with horseshoe/gullwing/whatever the mfr
> > calls them tips.  I have some on order for the irons at work, I'm
> > hoping they work well.
> >
> > --
> > Jonathan Hallameyer
>
>I've had marginal success doing this. I think the key is probably
>using the right tip (as you say) and lots of flux.

You only need two things to solder any leaded SMT package, the right
equipment and a steady hand.

At work we typically handle, every day, parts up to 244 PQFP at 0.5mm
and down to 0603 passive covering the whole gamut including BIG power
devices. We only use one type of soldering station - METCAL. Yes,
expensive, but they are the ONLY one we have tried that really works
well. Mainly because you can get the right shaped tips for them. Once
you have a good tip shape (I don't use the hoof I use the AXE style)
you can easily solder any SMD parts you want. We don't do any SMD
Production in house - this is all for lab prototypes or rework.

We use the METCAL MX1, but other models may work just as well. Check
out the big tips, hoof tip and axe tips to see.

Don't ever be fooled into using small tips. They don't work.

Some of us tack the corner pins using ordinary 0.35mm wire solder and
then run a bead of paste from a syringe along the pins. Others prefer
to brush the pins with flux and then merely load the tip with solder,
the technique you will see on Youtube.

For hobby use I know people that use things like Weller stations, so
I am sure Hakko or others will work too. But you need to use a big
tip and a steady hand when doing the IC's.

At home I cheat, not only do I have the METCAL MX1, I also got one of these:

http://cgi.ebay.ca/T-862-BGA-SMD-IRDA-Infrared-Electric-Rework-Station-862_W0QQitemZ350146050118QQcmdZViewItemQQptZBI_Electronic_Components?hash=item350146050118&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14&_trkparms=72%3A1215|66%3A2|65%3A12|39%3A1|240%3A1318

IR rework stations. Excellent!

John




>-
>ML
>

2009\01\03@222920 by Peter Loron

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On Jan 3, 2009, at 8:57 AM, John Day wrote:

{Quote hidden}

I love my MX-500! They can be had pretty reasonably off eBay.

-Pete

2009\01\04@224956 by John Day

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At 10:28 PM 1/3/2009, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Ah! The power supply / RF generator is MX-1, the complete station is
MX-500 in one of several different configurations. The one I got for
home is the MX-500TS11 with the Talon tool.

John

>

2009\01\05@120041 by Dwayne Reid

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At 11:35 AM 1/2/2009, M.L. wrote:

> > Drag soldering works well with horseshoe/gullwing/whatever the mfr
> > calls them tips.  I have some on order for the irons at work, I'm
> > hoping they work well.
>
>I've had marginal success doing this. I think the key is probably
>using the right tip (as you say) and lots of flux.

I've had great success with drag soldering.  Metcal calls their
drag-soldering tips "hoof tips".

We flood the whole area with liquid water-soluble flux (Kester
AZ2331), tack the corner pins down using just the solder plating on
the PCB, load the hoof tip up with solder, then drag the tip across
all the pins.  The whole process is quicker than the time it took to
type this paragraph.

Cleanup is just washing the PCB with hot water - the remaining flux
turns to soap bubbles and washes down the drain.

dwayne

--
Dwayne Reid   <@spam@dwaynerKILLspamspamplanet.eon.net>
Trinity Electronics Systems Ltd    Edmonton, AB, CANADA
(780) 489-3199 voice          (780) 487-6397 fax
http://www.trinity-electronics.com
Custom Electronics Design and Manufacturing

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