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'SMT Soldering'
1997\05\10@182619 by Bob Blick

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Hi Everyone,

I haven't been reading the list for a few weeks, forgive me if I am putting
forth old ideas.

I've soldered up boards using an ordinary electric oven and solder paste.

Put paste on the pads of the board using as little as possible. Place the
parts on the board(small parts first). Set aside.

Preheat to 425(fahrenheit) with an upside-down cast iron frying pan inside.

After the oven has settled(10 to 15 minutes) place the board on the frying
pan, and close the oven. Let bake for 3 minutes. Take the board out and let
cool.

-Bob

http://www.bobblick.com/


'SMT soldering'
1997\09\06@133944 by Harold M Hallikainen
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       Anyone doing vapor phase soldering?  Several years ago I saw a
vapor phase prototyping system that consisted of a Pyrex beaker with a
condensor around the top.  You put "stuff" in the bottom and bring it to
a boil.  A layer of vapor forms between the surface of the stuff and the
condensor.  You dip the boards (though not with your fingers!) with
solder paste mounted parts into the vapor for a few seconds.  I think
this was made by a solder company (Kester, maybe), but haven't seen it
since.
       Vapor phase soldering really makes a lot of sense to me.  It
seems that everything is very quickly brought up to the same temperature.
I think this contrasts nicely against infrared or toaster ovens... but
I've never used any of them!

Harold


'SMT Soldering'
1998\12\02@152647 by Martin
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Is there a place I can buy solder paste, and how is this applied to a
board, does it need any special tools?
What is the easiest way to solder small SMT parts, hot air, like a heat
gun, or the convection oven idea?

1998\12\02@155327 by Toby Baumgartner

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>Is there a place I can buy solder paste, and how is this applied to a
>board, does it need any special tools?

Digi-Key, (http://www.digikey.com)






*************************************************************
Toby Baumgartner -- Electrical Engineer
Schlumberger - ATE / AS Division
8377 Green Meadows Dr. North
Westerville, OH 43081
Phone (740) 548-1720        FAX (740) 548-7812
Email: spam_OUTbaumgartTakeThisOuTspamwesterville.tt.slb.com
*************************************************************

1998\12\03@070452 by Brian Hammill

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For detailed process instructions, check out http://www.paceusa.com.  My favorite technique for SMT soldering of gull-wing type packages is the Pace mini-wave process.  It uses a soldering tip that holds a small amount of solder in a spoon-like cavity.  The spoon of solder is passed over the leads of the device and the solder wicks into the joints between lead and PCB.  Make sure you read the process note on the pace web page.

Make sure to use a generous amount of liquid solder flux when you do this and a tip temperature of slightly under 700 degrees F should work well.  If you get solder bridges between pins, either you have too little flux or too much solder in the tip.

I have successfully soldered 144 lead TQFP packages on the first try without bridges or voids.  The Pace mini-wave tips are a standard size and will fit some brands other than Pace.  I must say that Pace does make an excellent iron, if you need another one.

If you want to solder PLCC and other J-leaded packages, I recommend solder paste and a hot air jet tool or carefully placed iron.

Good Luck,
Brian


'SMT soldering'
2003\01\30@100247 by Frank Babis
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> Hello All,
>
> I need to solder SMT parts (0805, SOT23, SOIC etc.) occasionally. However,
> in the catalogue of Farnell what I found soldering irons with tips which
> seem to be appropriate for the said parts are called as
> desoldering/reworking tools. My question is: are these nice things not
> capable to solder SMT parts at all? If really not, how could I do the job?
>
> Any help is greatly appreciated.

Check out the following yahoo group

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/E-Z_Bake/

They're experimenting with toaster ovens for use as
SMT soldering tools.


-Frank

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2003\01\30@140050 by Wagner Lipnharski

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dr. Imre Bartfai wrote:
> Hello All,
>
> I need to solder SMT parts (0805, SOT23, SOIC etc.) occasionally.
> However, in the catalogue of Farnell what I found soldering irons
> with tips which seem to be appropriate for the said parts are called
> as desoldering/reworking tools. My question is: are these nice things
> not capable to solder SMT parts at all? If really not, how could I do
> the job?
>
> Any help is greatly appreciated.
>
> Regards,
> Imre


For occasional SMT soldering:

Apply rosin flux type using a very small brush, over the SMT pads to
receive the component.
Don't worry to mess the board with the flux, you WILL NEED to wash the
board later with alcohol, water and soap anyway, wouldn't you?  Flux is
extremely necessary to make sure fast solder (no extreme heat) and no
solder bridge will happens between small distance between pins.

Before the flux dies out, using a 20 to 30W solder iron with the smallest
tip you can find, apply solder to one of the solder pads of each component
on the board.

Using a good tweezers, hold the component sideways, melt the solder on the
pad and press the component there, so it will be soldered at least by this
one lead. Make sure to align the component correctly.

Do it to all the components you want to solder.

Then, using a small diameter solder (0.025 is recommended - Kaster
QQ-S-571F WLRP-1), solder the unsoldered leads.

Some SMT resistors have a larger pad on the bottom (to better contact
solder when using oven soldering and solder paste). If you turn them
up-side-down, they seem to be easier to solder using manual procedure,
since the larger metal part will be exposed.

After all is done, verify, wash well with alcohol and a small tooth-brush,
immediately wash with hot water and a bit of liquid soap, hot water to
finish washing, hot air to dry out, ends up very clean and ready.  If you
are using connectors in the board, alcohol or water could be into the
holes, in this case, recommended procedure is to leave the board into any
oven (not microwave of course) for about 10 minutes at 50 to 60°C (120 to
140°F), so the whole board will be warm to hot and will evaporate all
possible liquid present on the board.

=======

For solder paste and oven soldering.
I am doing it with great success.

You need to purchase solder paste - Kester sells it, but you need to keep
refrigerated, if not, it dies short life.  In this process, no rosin flux
is necessary.  Just use a syringe and a small tip (size 18 or 20 serrated
and filed injection needle), and apply solder paste all over the solder
pads.

Multi-pin SMD chips, as ICs and all, you don't need to deposit a little dot
of solder paste over each pad, just lay down a long track of solder paste
over all pins at once. Don't worry, during the soldering process the flux
inside the solder paste will separate the solder to each pad, bridges can
happen, but exercising the right amount of solder paste in this process
will teach you what is the correct amount to not lack solder paste and not
creating bridges.  Too much solder paste WILL create bridges, but they are
very easy to eliminate using a solder iron.

Deposit all components over the solder paste, it will hold the component
there. Make sure not to bump or move rapidly the board, some components
will move. Extra care during handling the board. Do not do this at night,
you will be tired, hands shacking, sleepy, bored, you WILL do mistakes.

The use of tweezers is a must, but you can build a speedier devices, easy
and cheap.
Try to find out an aquarium air pump that has air input connector. Most of
the modern pumps has no intake connector, only the pressure output thing.
In this case, you can insert the whole pump into a hard sealed box or even
a jar, and create the intake connector on the jar cover or lead cap.  Use
an aquarium plastic air hose, I use a very flexible latex blue one, the
best for this kind of job.  Get (difficult to convince the pharmacy guy)
some 18 and 20 syringe needles - take a file with you and tell him you will
cut and file the needle right in the middle in front of him - explain to
him this is for electronic sucking small components, that you are not a
junkie trying to kill yourself.  Serrate and file the needles almost in the
middle, make it a clean and flat cut.  Connect everything and turn on the
pump.  It will create vacuum at the tip of the needle.  It will be used to
catch every component by vacuum.  Here is where the latex blue hose helps,
you can rotate the needle in your fingers to position correctly the angle
of the component without much effort.  Plastic hoses require extra effort
in your hand, in minutes you will be tired. The latex hose is so flexible
and it helps.  Use a long latex tube, and make it in a loop, hang it over
you, so it will comes from the top, easily to handle.  When you suck the
component with the needle, gently apply it over the solder paste on the
board, the solder paste has enough "tack" to secure the component in place
and detach it from the vacuum needle. The operation is simple and very
fast, much faster than using a tweezers.  You can apply 10 components over
the board with the vacuum needle, in the same time you can do only 2 with
the tweezers.

When everything is done, insert the board into your kitchen toaster oven
(but never use the same toaster for food anymore - due to dangerous lead
vapors that will be inside the oven), turn it on at 140°F for 4 minutes,
then 320°F for 2 minutes, then 450°F for one minute. Turn it off, wait it
cools down alone for 2 minutes, then open the oven door and leave there for
extra 5 minutes, remove the board, check for solder bridges between
multipin ICs, remove them using a hot iron, just touch it will such the
bridge.

I already produced an AVR (AT90S2313) controller for this, using a solid
state 20A relay, and a NTC glass sensor to monitor oven temperature.  It
works flawless every time.  We needed to readjust some numbers in the
process due the cold December winter in Florida, it really messed up with
the October numbers... :)  some soldering timing needed adjustment.  So,
now, we just insert the boards, press the START button, and voilá, 10
minutes later the board scream beeps and you can remove the boards
beautifully soldered - rinse in alcohol, water and soap, dry and they are
ready.

We probably will open the 2313 code very soon, so others can enjoy the
"Auto-SMD-oven-$19-at-any-Target-Store", as soon we enclose it in a nice
box and include some status LEDs.

================
Finally;

For SMT low quantity and board fixes, the manual soldering using a small
tip solder iron is the recommended.
For new boards production, nothing better than invest some time to learn
the toaster oven process.
In real, we are designing a nice small stainless-steel oven, double
insulated, with internal fan and 4 heaters, the external fan for
temperature extraction is a must. Front panel, temperature profiles setup,
etc. Probably it will end up as a low cost commercial unit.  Equivalent
ovens cost a little fortune, not because they cost so much to produce, but
just because in this area things are really expensive.


Wagner Lipnharski - email:  wagnerspamKILLspamustr.net
UST Research Inc. - Development Director
http://www.ustr.net - Orlando Florida 32837
Licensed Consultant Atmel AVR _/_/_/_/_/_/

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'SMT soldering'
2003\02\17@164037 by Sid Weaver
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After reading all the posts about SMT soldering I decided to give it a try.

I am using a Radio Shack desoldering tool, slightly modified from the list
description, with an aquarium air pump and 63/37 solder paste.  After some
trial and error I was able to develop a suitable procedure for applying the
solder paste.

The system is working very well indeed.  I can solder 050 pitch chips with no
problem, from 0805 capacitors to SOIC 18s, and yesterday I soldered a 100-pin
QFP chip, which is .025 pitch.  I had one bridge, which I was able to remove.

Thanks to who ever started the thread.  I now feel comfortable prototyping
with SMT devices, which I have previously avoided like the plague.  I will
still avoid the PLCC chips - they are very difficult to solder.


Sid Weaver
W4EKQ
Port Richey, FL

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2003\02\18@093942 by Ian McLean

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Why avoid PLCC ?  Are you one of these people that hate using IC sockets?
Sockets are easily obtained for PLCC and if you have the right IC extractor
tool, using them is a breeze.

{Original Message removed}

2003\02\18@095614 by D. Jay Newman

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Do you know of any good source for a 48-pin LCC socket?

I have three video imaging chips (cameras for my robot) that I need to
put into a board. I haven't been able to find either sockets or a way
to solder them in directly using simple equipment.

> Why avoid PLCC ?  Are you one of these people that hate using IC sockets?
> Sockets are easily obtained for PLCC and if you have the right IC extractor
> tool, using them is a breeze.
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2003\02\18@102045 by Ian McLean

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48pin?  I honestly did not think PLCC chips came in that size.  I know of
44pin and 52pin and can get them just about anywhere.  But I too cannot find
a source for your 48pin PLCC's.  If it is really 44 or 52 pin - then try
http://www.farnell.com, otherwise I believe you have some rather unusual
sized PLCC chips.

However, I have seen sockets for 48pin TSOP and DIP pckages.  Are you sure
your chips are PLCC or are they TSOP ?  If they are TSOP, you can get
sockets from the same source.

Hope this helps.
Ian.

{Original Message removed}

2003\02\18@103940 by D. Jay Newman

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This is a National Semiconductor LM9627 CMOS Color Imaging Sensor.

I didn't realize when I bought them that a 48 pin LCC was rare. The pins
are arranged 12 on each side, and .04" between "pin" centers.

And they are definately LCC.  :(

{Quote hidden}

> {Original Message removed}

2003\02\18@151510 by Herbert Graf

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I agree, there are through hole versions of PLCC sockets available that make
using them as easy as a DIP chip. Xilinx's 9536 CPLD is an example of a PLCC
chip I've used. TTYL

> {Original Message removed}

2003\02\18@164050 by cdb

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48 pin SMD sockets try   http://www.mill-max.com   they can also custom
make, hate to think of the minimum quantity though.

Colin
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2003\02\18@174210 by Timothy Box

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Are there any sockets that will solder onto a PCB designed for a 64-Lead
TQFP. I found the biggest problem was seeing the pins at 0.5mm pitch I had
to use a microscope. PS I used a 0.4 mm tipped angled soldering iron no
solder and just used the tinning on the PCB to make my connections.

Tim



{Original Message removed}

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