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'SMD Soldering witha miniture blow torch?'
1997\08\11@202246 by Peter Homann

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Hi,

I've had this crazy idea bouncing around in my head that it may be
possible to solder SMD devices using one of the small lighter fluid
gas soldering irons that have a hot air attachment.

I would plan to use this method for producing prototype boards only.
Solder paste would be placed on the pads, then left to cure for about
an hour at 45 degrees C, then the hot air from the blow torch would be
applied to each component in turn.

Has anybody tried this. and if so how successful is it?

My other option is to construct a reflow oven, using a fan-forced
convection oven (toaster oven). I've heard the thermal characteristics
are close enough to  provide very acceptable results.

Regards,

Peter.
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Peter Homann   email: spam_OUTpeterhTakeThisOuTspamadacel.com.au       Work : +61 3 9596-2991
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1997\08\11@203706 by Clyde Smith-Stubbs

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On Tue, Aug 12, 1997 at 10:22:10AM +1000, Peter Homann wrote:

> I've had this crazy idea bouncing around in my head that it may be
> possible to solder SMD devices using one of the small lighter fluid
> gas soldering irons that have a hot air attachment.

I've successfully soldered fine pitch (0.5mm) QFP-100 devices on a bare
board (no solder mask) using a heat gun (paint stripper/heat shrink type).
You do have to clean up afterwards with solder wick because it's impossible
to avoid bridges, but providing you get the solder paste on properly (run
a stripe along each set of pads) it works pretty well. Inspect carefully
with a magnifiying glass, and make sure you don't get paste trapped
under the component (it doesn't melt, and shorts out vias).

Oh, and let the board cool before picking it up - otherwise you have to
do it again after the chip falls off :-(

--
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1997\08\11@235431 by Bob Blick

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I have done smd soldering in a full-size oven. Prepare your board with the
paste and the parts. put a cast-iron frying pan upside down in your oven
and set to 425 degrees fahrenheit(if your oven adjusts in celcius, you'll
have to get a different oven<g>). Let the oven and frying pan preheat and
stabilize. When you think it's all warmed up, put the board on the frying
pan(the pan stays upside down, it's just a heat mass) and close up the
oven. Remove the board in three minutes, let cool for a few minutes before
washing.

I use Kester paste with water soluble flux. I've had excellent results, and
have even soldered 0.50 mm pitch 160 pin QFPs.

One word of advice: less paste is better than too much.

Why use the bottom of the fry pan? I don't like the taste of electronics in
my food!

Cheerful regards,

Bob

At 10:22 AM 8/12/97 +1000, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

http://www.bobblick.com/

1997\08\12@031756 by Glen Fry

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At 10:22 AM 12/08/97 +1000, you wrote:
>Hi,
>
>I've had this crazy idea bouncing around in my head that it may be
>possible to solder SMD devices using one of the small lighter fluid
>gas soldering irons that have a hot air attachment.

Peter,

I've been using a Weller Pyropen with pretty good results.

First I generally heat the pins/pads evenly until the device lifts off easily.
Then remove the excess solder from the pads with a standard iron and
solder wick and clean the area ISA or acetone.

Placing the new device is tricky.
Use solder paste (comes in a syringe style applicator and consists of a
granulated solder and flux) and put a thin strip of this paste along the pads.
Offsett the paste so as it is slightly more toward the inside edge of the pads.

Carefully place the new chip onto the pads and GENTLY heat the pins /
board holding the torch at about 45 degrees, and 10 mm away from the legs.
Try not to get too much heat into the chip. Unwanted solder bridges canm be
removed with some solder wick, and a touch more heat to reflow the solder.

I have a hot air blower tip which I have flattened to a gap of 1MM or so for
wider and more precise heating.

Small devices are no problem, and I have sucessfully used this method for 84
pin PLCC devices, but not as reliably.

Regards
ESM Australia Pty Ltd   Electronic Systems Maintenance      -     24 Hours
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1997\08\12@143440 by lilel

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Peter,


> My other option is to construct a reflow oven, using a fan-forced
> convection oven (toaster oven). I've heard the thermal
> characteristics are close enough to  provide very acceptable
> results.


Toaster ovens make GREAT lab ovens. Don't bother with the convection
type unless you happen to have one around. A cheap $30 toaster oven
will work fine.   I work for an outfit that makes toaster ovens, and
we often use them in the lab if we don't want to crank up the
industrial grade oven that uses an entire power plant's worth of
output.  I'll let you know as soon as I've done some reflow in one.

-- Lawrence Lile

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http://members.sockets.net/~llile/index.htm

1997\08\18@101718 by Martin McCormick

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In message <3.0.32.19970811203822.009b0e50spamspam_OUTmail.telis.org>, Bob Blick writes:
{Quote hidden}

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