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'SMD Soldering[OT]'
2000\05\09@180332 by Andrew Seddon

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<x-flowed>To save people in the US reading this I will start by saying this is
probably only relevant to people in the UK as that is where I live.

I am currently in the situation where I am about to complete the design of a
board for a project I am doing. However I have had to cut the space down and
so have used SMT wherever possible. Including the microcontroller(an SX).
This is in a 52pin PQFP package with 0.65 pitch. I`m pretty sure I can
handle the rest of the soldering but I reckon I will completely mess up this
quite expensive part. I also cannot afford to get any specialist equipment
to do the job properly. I was therefore hoping somebody could help me out.
If I paid for postage there and back would somebody be willing to do the
deed for me. I would be willing to pay or possibly swap some
knowledge/code/designs etc.

Any help offered would be greatly appreciated as I can`t think of a simple
way around this problem.
________________________________________________________________________
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</x-flowed>

2000\05\09@182221 by Quitt, Walter

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Whilst not in the UK, our girls oft times will hand assemble our protos.
This includes some pretty small little parts.  Processors too.  So it
can be done by hand. I'll assume you have assembly houses over there.
You may try one of those.  It shouldn't cost too much for them to do
a whole board.  Typical costs for small runs, on the outside, is usually
less than US $10 per board in small runs.  That's in Silcon Valley South,
San Diego, California where there is a lot of electronics being designed
and built.

{Original Message removed}

2000\05\09@190809 by Arthur

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Andrew is it that you have not got a steady hand ? and do not have a very
small tip to you magic wand.
I would be willing to talk you though how to mod your iron and fix to
board.or if you are all out of people to do it I would do the deed.
take it off list

Art :-) spam_OUTartbTakeThisOuTspamcableinet.co.uk
{Original Message removed}

2000\05\09@192502 by jamesnewton

face picon face
I think I have a pretty good page on SMD soldering at
http://techref.massmind.org/smds
and I'd love to hear some feedback or notes on what I've missed.

I'm also working on a design for a SX 48/52 adapter than would support the
direct soldering of either or use a socket for the 52. If there is any
interest, I can get the board cost down to a point that will be worth
paying.

---
James Newton .....jamesnewtonKILLspamspam@spam@geocities.com 1-619-652-0593
http://techref.massmind.org
All the engineering secrets worth knowing

{Original Message removed}

2000\05\09@200413 by Michael Rigby-Jones

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part 0 3688 bytes
<P><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">To save people in the US reading this I will start by saying this is</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">probably only relevant to people in the UK as that is where I live.</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">I am currently in the situation where I am about to complete the design of a</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">board for a project I am doing. However I have had to cut the space down and</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">so have used SMT wherever possible. Including the microcontroller(an SX).</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">This is in a 52pin PQFP package with 0.65 pitch. I`m pretty sure I can</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">handle the rest of the soldering but I reckon I will completely mess up this</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">quite expensive part. I also cannot afford to get any specialist equipment</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">to do the job properly. I was therefore hoping somebody could help me out.</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">If I paid for postage there and back would somebody be willing to do the</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">deed for me. I would be willing to pay or possibly swap some</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">knowledge/code/designs etc.</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">Any help offered would be greatly appreciated as I can`t think of a simple</FONT>
<BR><FONT SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">way around this problem.</FONT>
</P>
</UL>
<P><FONT COLOR="#0000FF" SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">It's not as hard as it looks really.&nbsp; I'm a bit of a klutz with a soldering iron, but I had to get handy with it since I started my new job, 0402 resistors and caps are getting common, one sneeze and you've spread the lot over the floor.</FONT></P>

<P><FONT COLOR="#0000FF" SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">One thing that is really important though, is making sure the board is clean, and you use some flux.&nbsp; Not acid flux like plumbers use, proper electronic, preferably water soluable flux.&nbsp; If you have solder paste then the job is easier, if not, just flux the pads and run some solder over them.&nbsp; The solder shouldn't bridge the pads as long as they are clean and fluxed.&nbsp; Flux the legs of the IC and plonk it down onto the PCB and make sure it's well aligned on all four sides.&nbsp; This is the bit I find the hardest actually, I have slightly shaky hands sometimes and it's difficult to hold the device still.&nbsp; Simply run the soldering iron carefully down the pins and an excellent joint should form.&nbsp; Use a magnifying glass to check for shorts.</FONT></P>

<P><FONT COLOR="#0000FF" SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">Practice of course makes perfect, but even I managed to glue down a TSOP device first go with no shorts.</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT COLOR="#0000FF" SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">Now, *removing* them with no damage is the tricky bit if you don't have a nice hot air pencil.</FONT>
</P>

<P><FONT COLOR="#0000FF" SIZE=2 FACE="Arial">Mike</FONT>
</P>

</BODY>
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2000\05\09@214234 by Dan Michaels

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Andrew Seddon wrote:
....
>I am currently in the situation where I am about to complete the design of a
>board for a project I am doing. However I have had to cut the space down and
>so have used SMT wherever possible. Including the microcontroller(an SX).
>This is in a 52pin PQFP package with 0.65 pitch. I`m pretty sure I can
>handle the rest of the soldering but I reckon I will completely mess up this
>quite expensive part.
.......

I haven't personally tried this method, but I read that you can
go ahead and solder all the pins on fine pitch SMT, and then go
back over them using solder wick to draw excess solder away from
the chip - apparently removes solder bridges quite well.

2000\05\09@220407 by Sebastian Garcia

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Yes its true, I use this method frequently with SMD. No problem with the
excess of solder, the mesh then sucks it. You need only patience...

For good results, use quality solder wik.

Regards,

S.-

Dan wrote:

|I haven't personally tried this method, but I read that you can
|go ahead and solder all the pins on fine pitch SMT, and then go
|back over them using solder wick to draw excess solder away from
|the chip - apparently removes solder bridges quite well.
|

2000\05\09@220613 by David Lions

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Get a 'hoof' tip that will fit your current soldering iron.  Fill hoof tip
to get a very slight outward curvature on the solder pool.  Very slight.
Drown the target in flux, align it, solder two opposing pins.  Run the hoof
tip along the outside edge of the remaining pins.  Its very easy, I can do
TSSOP, TQFP etc first time every time, no bridges.  Just remember lots of
flux. Lots.



At 03:00 PM 5/9/00 PDT, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

David Lions
Lab Technician
Miva Communications
Ph: +61-2-9906-2277
Fax: +61-2-9906-4818

2000\05\10@030211 by Stephan Kotze

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I have used the below mentioned technique to some success. An easier way is
to buy a small syringe of proper solder paste. I apply the paste thinly with
a fine brush, place the part on the pads, correctly align and then heat one
pin on each side with a fine soldering iron. This ensures that the part is
seated properly, then I heat the rest of the pins. No bridges!. A rinse with
flux remover get rid of any excess paste between the legs.

Stephan

{Original Message removed}

2000\05\10@170653 by Morgan Olsson

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David Lions wrote:

>Get a 'hoof' tip

Can you explain for us foerign people what this is, please?

/Morgan

2000\05\10@182126 by kayode.ayandokun

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Michael Rigby-Jones <mrjonesspamKILLspamNORTELNETWORKS.COM> wrote:
> [...]
> Flux the legs of the IC and plonk it down onto the PCB and make sure
> it's well aligned on all four sides.  This is the bit I find the
> hardest actually, I have slightly shaky hands sometimes and it's
> difficult to hold the device still.
> [...]

Try using very small pieces of blu-tack on each corner of the chip to
hold it in place while you position it.  This allows you get it just
right, holds it while you solder and then can be easily removed.

Kayode
____________________________________________________________________
Put your next PIC project on TV!
http://www.blackboxcamera.com/Stv5730a/STV5730A.htm

2000\05\10@224404 by Brandon, Tom

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Hoof tips are made by Metcal (http://www.metcal.com) and perhaps others. From
Metcal web site:
"Metcal's SMTC-x147 "hoof" tip (so named because it looks like a tiny
horse's hoof) is specially designed for multi-lead soldering, a fast and
increasingly popular technique for attaching SMD 's including J-Leaded, fine
pitch, and gull-wing packages. In multi-lead soldering, you apply solder
directly to the tip of the soldering tool and then draw the tip with its
reservoir of solder across a row of leads, one side at a time, until the
device is firmly attached. The use of flux, Metcal's direct power delivery,
and the nature of multi-lead soldering naturally "meters" the correct and
uniform amount of solder for each connection without solder wicking ,
lengthy dwell times, or other problems that can result in defective rework."

In a test for Compaq, Metcal were by hand with only a hoof tip (they have a
smaller Mini-Hoof) able to attach QFPs up to 196pin, PLCC chips and sockets
up to 44pin and

Sounds pretty good to me, anyone had experience with Metcal tips\irons?
Also, the cost of the metcal soldering station is fairly high, the
MX-500S-11 at US$650 is the cheapest package with a handpiece that'll take
the hoof\mini hoof.

Are there any cheaper manufacturers who make handpieces that accept Metcal
STTC tips? Alternatively are there other hoof tips for cheaper irons? If so,
are they as good? Metcal's smartheat technology sounds pretty neat. No
temperature adjustment needed. And, the logic that you want to put as much
heat in the chip in as short a time as possible sounds smart.

Also, anyone know a cheap Australian supplier?

Tom.

-----Original Message-----
From: Morgan Olsson [.....morgans.rtKILLspamspam.....TELIA.COM]
Sent: Thursday, May 11, 2000 7:03 AM
To: EraseMEPICLISTspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTMITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: Re: SMD Soldering[OT]


David Lions wrote:

>Get a 'hoof' tip

Can you explain for us foerign people what this is, please?

/Morgan

2000\05\11@094751 by Bennett, Matt

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I've used Radio Shack, Weller, Metcal and a bunch of other lesser known
soldering irons.  The Metcal irons are by far *the best*.  On the other hand
I don't think for the home user they are necessarily worth it.  Features I
like- near instantaneous heating of the iron tip from cold to soldering
temperature (maybe 3 seconds), super quick tip changes, thin, comfortable
handle.  Every place that I have worked that has had a dedicated
model/rework shop has used Metcal exclusively.

One thing to be aware of with Metcal irons- they use RF to heat the tip, and
will screw up RF measurements made near a running iron.



{Original Message removed}

2000\05\11@100545 by Craig Peacock

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The alignment of pins is the most difficult part of surface mount
soldering. Don't bother with blue tack or expoxy. The most effective
means is by bumping up a pad in each corner of the device. By bumping, I
mean add a little bit of solder to the corner pads. Then lay the
component over the top of the pads and align some of the pins. As you go
tack in the outer pins to the bumped up pads. What this does, is
securely holds the device in place, while giving you enough freedom to
reflow your tacked pins and ever so slightly move the component into
place. Once you are absolutely happy with alignment you can then solder
all the pins, without having the residues from blue tac or the like.

{Quote hidden}

The Hoof tip also goes under the name of Miniflow / Continuous Flow tips
from Vanier. Don't be scared off by the cost of Surface Mount. I have
cheapest Hakko 926 with both a Miniflow and Hakko K-Bar (900M-T-K) tips
for my setup at home. Ideal for any QFP/TQFP components. The tips are
about $20 Australian and fit the Hakko irons.

The Miniflow/Hoof tips have already been described by Tom. The K-Bar is
a like a small knife with a point about 45deg. You can lay solder around
the perimeter of the device over the legs. Then using the K-bar, melt
the solder with one side of the knife over the pins, and gently pull
outwards. The most important thing about surface mount soldering - don't
worry if solder bridges the pins. Simply apply more flux and rework the
pins. With QFP etc, you don't solder each pin individually but rather
many at a time. With the right amount of solder, it will flow into the
joints giving a neat finish without any bridging.

Which tip you use is normally up to personal preference. I like to use
the K Bar for Gull Wing Components and the Miniflow for J Leaded
Components using Mini Flow Tip. However the K bar also has a pointy tip
which is ideal for tacking in your corner tips, thus you can use the one
tip for both jobs. This comes in ideal when you only have one iron, such
is normally the case at home.

> Sounds pretty good to me, anyone had experience with Metcal tips\irons?

I have a Metcal desoldering tool at work. Very nice unit. Too bad they
cost so much or I would buy one for home.

> Are there any cheaper manufacturers who make handpieces that accept Metcal
> STTC tips? Alternatively are there other hoof tips for cheaper irons? If so,
> are they as good? Metcal's smartheat technology sounds pretty neat. No
> temperature adjustment needed. And, the logic that you want to put as much
> heat in the chip in as short a time as possible sounds smart.
>
> Also, anyone know a cheap Australian supplier?

You could always try Mektronics for the Vanier and Hakko Tips. . . They
have agents in most states.

Regards,

Craig Peacock

2000\05\11@132820 by Stephan Kotze

picon face
For that kind of price you might consider a hot air pencil. I just bought
one which has temp control + flow volume control + vacuum for around USD215
!

Stephan
----- Original Message -----
From: Bennett, Matt <Matt.Bennettspamspam_OUTANDREW.COM>
To: <@spam@PICLISTKILLspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Thursday, May 11, 2000 3:11 PM
Subject: Re: SMD Soldering[OT]


> I've used Radio Shack, Weller, Metcal and a bunch of other lesser known
> soldering irons.  The Metcal irons are by far *the best*.  On the other
hand
> I don't think for the home user they are necessarily worth it.  Features I
> like- near instantaneous heating of the iron tip from cold to soldering
> temperature (maybe 3 seconds), super quick tip changes, thin, comfortable
> handle.  Every place that I have worked that has had a dedicated
> model/rework shop has used Metcal exclusively.
>
> One thing to be aware of with Metcal irons- they use RF to heat the tip,
and
> will screw up RF measurements made near a running iron.
>
>
>
> {Original Message removed}

2000\05\11@174354 by Andrew Seddon

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<x-flowed>Thanks to all those that have offered tips, I will definetly look into
getting some decent eqipment once I get the money together. Also I have to
sort my soldering skills out! Luckily this time Lee Mason has kindly offered
to help.

Once again, Cheers.


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</x-flowed>

2000\05\15@170849 by kayode.ayandokun

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As a follow up to this topic I have written a brief note on the simple
method using blu-tack that allows for the efficient hand soldering of
SMD devices. If interested please visit

http://freespace.virgin.net/kayode.ayandokun/STV5730A/SmartSoldering.htm

Kayode.
____________________________________________________________________
Put your next PIC project on TV!
http://www.blackboxcamera.com/Stv5730a/STV5730A.htm

2000\05\18@152155 by Andrew Seddon

picon face
Just to wrap this thread up, can anybody recommend a good supplier of
soldering equipment/consumables in the UK? And specifically products they
have used with success. I think I`ll get a new iron for the job as the #10
one I have at the minute probably won`t be suitable for the fine pitch SM.
BTW i`m on a student budget..


Thanks for any help.

2000\05\26@110225 by Andrew Seddon

picon face
Could somebody tell me what flux is? I know normal solder has it. Also for
SM should I get the solder and flux seprately? I`m not a complete idiot but
nobody has ever really explained this to me and all tutorials seem to assume
this knowledge.

Thanks.

2000\05\26@113408 by Craig Lee

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You should buy solder paste.  It is minute balls of solder suspended in
a solid paste.  You apply it by using a screen, like silkscreening or
you put it in a syringe and meter it out on each pad individually. Place
your parts on the coated pads. Then you get yourself a toaster oven and
you pop the board in and bake until done.

If you are doing this one joint at a time, you should buy solder with
flux in it.  I use solder with no clean flux in it.  No clean is a highly
active flux, and it can be harder on your soldering tip.  Also, if you don't
have very good temperature control of your iron, no clean will vaporize
before it has an opportunity to de-ozidize anything.  With a little
practice and a decent iron, this isn't a big issue, and the advantage
of not having to wash your board is realized.

I use a size #50 solder with a 63/37 mixture with no clean flux.  For
finer stuff you can go smaller, but the flux content just isn't there.
The finer stuff is dubbed angel hair because it is so small.

Craig


-----Original Message-----
From: pic microcontroller discussion list
[KILLspamPICLISTKILLspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU]On Behalf Of Andrew Seddon
Sent: Thursday, May 25, 2000 7:30 PM
To: RemoveMEPICLISTTakeThisOuTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: SMD Soldering[OT]


Could somebody tell me what flux is? I know normal solder has it. Also for
SM should I get the solder and flux seprately? I`m not a complete idiot but
nobody has ever really explained this to me and all tutorials seem to assume
this knowledge.

Thanks.

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