Searching \ for 'Recomend temp sensor please' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/io/sensors.htm?key=sensor
Search entire site for: 'Recomend temp sensor please'.

Truncated match.
PICList Thread
'Recomend temp sensor please'
1998\04\24@120047 by john pearson

flavicon
face
Thank you for reading
I need a recomendation for temp sensors. I want to attach sensors to
automobile parts (carb, intake manifold, trans., differential...). Temps
will not exceed 240 F. Also, how to avoid induction in wiring from high
energy ignition.
Thank you
John

1998\04\25@013222 by Bob Blick

face
flavicon
face
Thermistors. Standard 10kohm@25C ones go for about $0.50 and can be read
any number of ways, depending on how accurate you want to get. Simplest
implementation would just use a capacitor(say 1uF) and a small resistor(say
220 ohms) off of any pic pin. Use the thermistor as a pullup to charge the
cap. The pic pin hooks to the cap through the resistor. Drive the pic pin
low for a while, then TRIS it to an input and time how long it takes to
become "1".

This method ignores most electrical demons, and can be done in the
background in a timer-based interrupt. And it's cheap.

-bob


At 09:10 AM 4/24/98 -0700, you wrote:
>Thank you for reading
>I need a recomendation for temp sensors. I want to attach sensors to
>automobile parts (carb, intake manifold, trans., differential...). Temps
>will not exceed 240 F. Also, how to avoid induction in wiring from high
>energy ignition.
>Thank you
>John
>

http://www.bobblick.com/

1998\04\25@135602 by ape

flavicon
face
For the simplest implementation, I agree.  Since you only need to go up to 240
F (About 115 C) and most standard thermistors go up to 150 C (302 F) you should
be ok.  The problem will be on mounting it so the vibration doesn't shake it to
death.  A good thermal conducting silicon based product should help vibration
while still allowing the heat to get to the sensor.

FIFTY CENTS?!?!?!  Where do you buy at? In quantities of 1, I can only find
them for about $2.00 each.

An alternative (and more costly / complicated / accurate?) way would be to use
thermocouples

Bob Blick wrote:

{Quote hidden}

1998\04\25@161008 by Craig Lee

flavicon
face
You might want to look at the DS1624 digital thermometer and memory chip.

It has 13 bits of resolution and a temperature range of -25C to 125C, and
you
can store your calibration factors in the 256 bytes of eeprom.

It is also an I2C device, which may be a problem if you don't have good
noise
isolation.

Craig

{Original Message removed}

1998\04\25@223051 by Bob Blick

face
flavicon
face
Jameco Electronics. I think the last 100 I bought cost .39 each.

http://www.jameco.com or something like that ought to get you there.

Cheers,
Bob


At 10:55 AM 4/25/98 -0700, you wrote:
>FIFTY CENTS?!?!?!  Where do you buy at? In quantities of 1, I can only find
>them for about $2.00 each.

>Bob Blick wrote:
>> Thermistors. Standard 10kohm@25C ones go for about $0.50 and can be read


http://www.bobblick.com/

1998\04\27@201146 by Sean Breheny

face picon face
>
>At 09:10 AM 4/24/98 -0700, you wrote:
>>Thank you for reading
>>I need a recomendation for temp sensors. I want to attach sensors to
>>automobile parts (carb, intake manifold, trans., differential...). Temps
>>will not exceed 240 F. Also, how to avoid induction in wiring from high
>>energy ignition.
>>Thank you
>>John
>>


Somebody may have already responded to this and if so, I apologize for the
added bandwidth. About avoiding induction from high energy ignition: I
would suggest using a twisted pair of wires from the sensor to the rest of
the circuit. Also, try to minimize the length of wire from the sensor to
the circuit. The fact that the wires are twisted together minimizes the
area contained bewteen the wires (it theoretically makes it zero) and since
induction dependes upon the product of area times rate of change in
magnetic flux, this minimizes induction.
       You will probably also have trouble powering the circuit from the car's
electrical system. Be sure to regulate the supply coming into the circuit,
filter it with both a  low ESR electrolytic (about 20uF) and a ceramic disc
0.1 uF cap.

Good luck,

Sean

+--------------------------------+
| Sean Breheny                   |
| Amateur Radio Callsign: KA3YXM |
| Electrical Engineering Student |
+--------------------------------+
Fight injustice, please look at
http://homepages.enterprise.net/toolan/joanandrews/

Personal page: http://www.people.cornell.edu/pages/shb7
spam_OUTshb7TakeThisOuTspamcornell.edu
Phone(USA): (607) 253-0315

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 1998 , 1999 only
- Today
- New search...