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PICList Thread
'Re[2]: Weird, Wacky, Zany PIC applications'
1999\05\05@124815 by Scott Fink

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    Do you have any digital pics of the characters or know where I could
    get them?  Maybe I could contact the batt manufacturer for a picture
    if you let me know who they are.

    Thanks,
    Scott


______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________
Subject: Re: Weird, Wacky, Zany PIC applications
Author:  spam_OUTPICLISTTakeThisOuTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU (Ian Rozowsky) at Internet_Exchange
Date:    5/5/99 7:09 AM


{Quote hidden}

I did an application a while back for a TV game show sponsored by a
battery manufacturer. Two characters, called Sparkman (the good guy)
and Dr Dark (the meanie), romped around the studio, while the
contestants were asked electricity related questions. Each wrong
answer resulted in Dr Dark being given a "recharge" in the form of a
battery, which he dropped into a tube on his costume. His hat
contained a "Power meter", essentially a column of LEDS,  which
started off each round at "FULL", and slowly drained to "EMPTY", at
which point he was defeated. Each "Recharge" resulted in his power
being increased one notch on the "Power Meter". I used a '57 to drive
the column of LEDs, as well as generate a PWM output to an
incandescent bulb which glowed in proportion to the "POWER" left. A
microswitch in the tube sensed the passage of a battery, which upped
his power level.

Sparkman wore a helmet which sported a lightning bolt shaped line of
LEDs which were also '57 controlled, and were sequenced to look like
a bolt of lightning striking.

It gave me a huge kick to see these "toys" displayed on national
television :).

Ian Rozowsky
Development Engineer
Centurion Systems
Box 506 Cramerview 2060 South Africa
Tel   : +27-11-708-2680
Fax   : +27-11-708-2630
e-mail: .....rozKILLspamspam@spam@centsys.co.za
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1999\05\06@181849 by Scott Fink

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    Remember, use your powers for good, never for evil!

    I am still watching all these, and several are probably useable.  I
    have contacted several of you already.

    Best Regards,
    Scott Fink
    MCHP


______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________
Subject: Re: Weird, Wacky, Zany PIC applications
Author:  PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU (Roger Shane) at Internet_Exchange
Date:    5/6/99 11:07 AM


----------
From:   Mike Harrison[SMTP:.....wwlKILLspamspam.....netcomuk.co.uk]
Sent:   Thursday, May 06, 1999 3:15 AM
To:     EraseMEPICLISTspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTMITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject:        Re: Weird, Wacky, Zany PIC applications
Importance:     High

> > > > snippity-kerchunk < < < < <

> I thought of a fun variation on this - a device with an IR LED that
> randomly changes TV channels every few minutes - again, stick it under
> a table or whatever in sight of the TV but not the viewer!

Heheheh...how about the TV section of your less than favorite department store?

Regards/Roger in Bangkok, gettin' ready to scope out Robinsons and Centrals A/V
sections!

WHADDAYA MEAN OT...who sez?
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1999\05\06@183347 by Dave VanHorn

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face
> > I thought of a fun variation on this - a device with an IR LED that
> > randomly changes TV channels every few minutes - again, stick it under
> > a table or whatever in sight of the TV but not the viewer!
>
> Heheheh...how about the TV section of your less than favorite department
store?


Just build it into a remote case, so it looks like just another button-box.

It would be a good idea also to have it play for a while, then go to sleep
for a long while, maybe several hours.  Use a nice long PN generator to make
a randomized sleep and play time interval.


That way it makes finding the troublemaker VERY interesting.  Bonus points
if you can get it on top of some display they haven't messed with in a year
or so.

You could also use the signals from the other remotes to tell you when the
store is open, and when it's not.

1999\05\06@190313 by ryan pogge

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anyone got any code to controll TVs???
I would love to try this on my dad.
thanks,
Ryan

> > > I thought of a fun variation on this - a device with an IR LED
that
> > > randomly changes TV channels every few minutes - again, stick it
under
> > > a table or whatever in sight of the TV but not the viewer!
> >
> > Heheheh...how about the TV section of your less than favorite
department
> store?
>
>
> Just build it into a remote case, so it looks like just another
button-box.
>
> It would be a good idea also to have it play for a while, then go to
sleep
> for a long while, maybe several hours.  Use a nice long PN generator
to make
> a randomized sleep and play time interval.
>
>
> That way it makes finding the troublemaker VERY interesting.  Bonus
points
> if you can get it on top of some display they haven't messed with in
a year
> or so.
>
> You could also use the signals from the other remotes to tell you
when the
> store is open, and when it's not.
>

1999\05\06@194244 by Jim Paul

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Scott,

I didn't think the application I have is ZANY.  I think it's more a
practical thing.    But I've had several friends and family members
say I should submit it and let you decide if it is ZANY enough.
Here goes.

When I was at my previous employer, I used a PIC to improve on a controller
that didn't always work correctly, and at the same time I reduced the size
of
the thing substantially.   What it did was to monitor a diffusion furnace at
a wafer
fab to make sure everything worked as it should.  It would monitor different
gasses,
a flame detector, a couple of Mass Flow Controllers (MFC's), and an ignition
signal.    If any of the inputs that needed to be there weren't there, the
PIC would
shut down the furnace and sound an alarm.  I am the sole author of the
software, and
originator of the circuit.   I believe I still have the software listing
here somewhere,
and a pinout of the PIC as used in the prototype.  If you are interested,
let me know
and I'll look up everything and get it to you.   If not, I'll understand.

Regards,

Jim



{Original Message removed}

1999\05\07@051805 by wwl

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On Thu, 6 May 1999 15:13:00 -0700, you wrote:

>     Geesh, I didn't realize the creulty on this list!
>
>     Remember, use your powers for good, never for evil!

>----------
>From:   Mike Harrison[SMTP:wwlspamspam_OUTnetcomuk.co.uk]
>Sent:   Thursday, May 06, 1999 3:15 AM
>To:     @spam@PICLISTKILLspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
>Subject:        Re: Weird, Wacky, Zany PIC applications
>Importance:     High
>
>> > > > snippity-kerchunk < < < < <
>
>> I thought of a fun variation on this - a device with an IR LED that
>> randomly changes TV channels every few minutes - again, stick it under
>> a table or whatever in sight of the TV but not the viewer!
>
>Heheheh...how about the TV section of your less than favorite department store?
.. in which case a fun strategy strategy would be to  max out the
volume on random sets, or just turn them off randomly.....
>Regards/Roger in Bangkok, gettin' ready to scope out Robinsons and Centrals A/V
>sections!
>
>WHADDAYA MEAN OT...who sez?

1999\05\07@211922 by Russell McMahon

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>You could also use the signals from the other remotes to tell you
when the
>store is open, and when it's not.


Now that suggests  an idea!!!

This cruel idea sounded like it had promise BUT it had the
disadvantage of needing to be matched to the IR codes of the
device(s) being controlled. However, by adding a photodetector one
could have a a  learning remote so it established the codes to use
just by listening! Add a bit more intelligence and you could almost
certainly establish which were the on/off codes and the TV channel
select codes. Volume control would probably be obvious by the manner
it is used compared to channel change (ie hold down for n outputs to
pan setting).

Maybe one could make a fortune selling these to TV repairers :-)


Russell McMahon


From: Dave VanHorn <;KILLspamdvanhornKILLspamspamCEDAR.NET>

>> > I thought of a fun variation on this - a device with an IR LED
that
>> > randomly changes TV channels every few minutes - again, stick it
under
>> > a table or whatever in sight of the TV but not the viewer!
>>
>> Heheheh...how about the TV section of your less than favorite
department
>store?
>
>
>Just build it into a remote case, so it looks like just another
button-box.
>
>It would be a good idea also to have it play for a while, then go to
sleep
>for a long while, maybe several hours.  Use a nice long PN generator
to make
>a randomized sleep and play time interval.
>
>
>That way it makes finding the troublemaker VERY interesting.  Bonus
points
>if you can get it on top of some display they haven't messed with in
a year
>or so.
>

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