Searching \ for 'PCB & Schematic' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/pcbs.htm?key=pcb
Search entire site for: 'PCB & Schematic'.

Truncated match.
PICList Thread
'PCB & Schematic'
1997\07\19@004431 by Ron Wilcox

flavicon
face
I'm interested in buying PCB and Schematic Capture software for work.  The
two I've heard about but not sure if they are any good is Protel and Orcad
(Win95).  Anyone have any experience (good or bad) with either or something
else?  I'd appreciate any comments to help me decide.  I have about $6K to
spend.

Happy trails,
Ron
National Aeronautics and                       Ron Wilcox
Space Administration                    Flight Operations Engineer

Dryden Flight Research Center           F-16XL Cranked Arrow Wing
PO Box 273                         X-36 Advanced Tactical Demonstrator
MS:  D2050                              Flight Termination Systems
Edwards, CA 93523-0273
email:  spam_OUTron.wilcoxTakeThisOuTspamdfrc.nasa.gov         http://www.dfrc.nasa.gov

1997\07\19@024003 by Ross McKenzie

flavicon
face
At 21:35 18/07/97 -0700, you wrote:
>I'm interested in buying PCB and Schematic Capture software for work.  The
>two I've heard about but not sure if they are any good is Protel and Orcad
>(Win95).  Anyone have any experience (good or bad) with either or something
>else?  I'd appreciate any comments to help me decide.  I have about $6K to
>spend.
>
>Happy trails,
>Ron
>National Aeronautics and                       Ron Wilcox
>Space Administration                    Flight Operations Engineer
>
>Dryden Flight Research Center           F-16XL Cranked Arrow Wing
>PO Box 273                         X-36 Advanced Tactical Demonstrator
>MS:  D2050                              Flight Termination Systems
>Edwards, CA 93523-0273
>email:  .....ron.wilcoxKILLspamspam@spam@dfrc.nasa.gov         http://www.dfrc.nasa.gov
>

Ron,

Being Australian, I can highly recommend Protel, although that was not the
reason that we chose their excellent products.

Wouldn't use anything else.

Regards,

Ross McKenzie
Melbourne Australia

1997\07\19@064654 by Ian Raymond Douglas

flavicon
face
Hi Ron
     We have been using Protel under win95 for some time now and have
never had a problem with it and also find it to be a very capable program
with a lot of features. Took a little getting used to but appears to be
more or less an industry standard. Well worth the cost.
                      Regards, Ian
On Fri, 18 Jul 1997, Ron Wilcox wrote:

> I'm interested in buying PCB and Schematic Capture software for work.  The
> two I've heard about but not sure if they are any good is Protel and Orcad
> (Win95).  Anyone have any experience (good or bad) with either or something
> else?  I'd appreciate any comments to help me decide.  I have about $6K to
> spend.
>
> Happy trails,
> Ron

1997\07\19@073544 by James

flavicon
face
We use the windows version of Protel and are very happy with it.
However, any capable schematic, pcb, and router software is very
large and complex.  You should evaluate all packages of interest to
you.
The DOS version of Protel mentioned on this list has not been under
development by Protel for several years and I believe is freeware
available at http://www.protel.com.
James

At 09:35 PM 7/18/97 -0700, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

1997\07\19@085649 by Mike
flavicon
face
At 04:39 AM 7/19/97 -0700, you wrote:
>We use the windows version of Protel and are very happy with it.
>However, any capable schematic, pcb, and router software is very
>large and complex.  You should evaluate all packages of interest to
>you.
>The DOS version of Protel mentioned on this list has not been under
>development by Protel for several years and I believe is freeware
>available at http://www.protel.com.

Unfortunately James the Dos for Protel is not on the site - they have a
reduced version called EASYTRAX - which is not as comprehensive as
TRAXEDIT.EXE etc Incidentally I have the dongle version of TRAXEDIT.EXE
with a dongle that is becoming more unreliable - anyone have the nondongle
version of TRAXEDIT.EXE ?

I know a few people who have the Windows version of Protel on Win95
and often have GPFs - they are quite exeasperated and do not seem to get
that much support from Protel...

Also protel state on their web site they will allow download of the
graphics drivers used for the dos program in Pascal but, there are many
missing and its only in assembler.

Rdgs

Mike

1997\07\19@091349 by Oliver P.

flavicon
face
I really like Tango, it was very easy to use and gets the job done. But I'm
in the minority.

----------

1997\07\19@093720 by Andy Kunz

flavicon
face
At 09:35 PM 7/18/97 -0700, you wrote:
>I'm interested in buying PCB and Schematic Capture software for work.  The
>two I've heard about but not sure if they are any good is Protel and Orcad
>(Win95).  Anyone have any experience (good or bad) with either or something
>else?  I'd appreciate any comments to help me decide.  I have about $6K to
>spend.

My one customer refers to Protel as "Pro-Hell" if that's any indication.

Try Hi-Wire from Wintek.  Much better at doing what it does.  Uses a dongle
for copy protection, is DOS-based I believe.  It runs on all the 95 boxes
there, though, and the interface is pretty intuitive.

I use SuperCAD/SuperPCB from Mental Automation http://www.mentala.com and
I'm pretty happy.  Much cheaper, but less features.

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz - Montana Design - 409 S 6th St - Phillipsburg, NJ 08865
         Hardware & Software for Industry & R/C Hobbies
       "Go fast, turn right, and keep the wet side down!"
==================================================================

1997\07\19@105701 by vanes

flavicon
face
Oliver P. wrote:

> I really like Tango, it was very easy to use and gets the job done.
> But I'm
> in the minority.
>
> ----------

I 'm sure Tango was a PCB layout program? I've got the old OrCad for
DOS (incomplete - electrical part only) and Tango 2.

OrCad is nice & good and I like the idea of the complete package: they
had hydraulics, flowdiagrams, HT (electrician) symbols, etc. Looked like
a very nice package.

Protel I don't know - apart from that EASYTRAX thing they had out for
free. I don't like it much.

--
eric van es
.....vanesKILLspamspam.....ilink.nis.za
cape town, south-africa
Looking for TEMPORARY/HOLIDAY ACCOMMODATION? http://www.nis.za/~vanes/

1997\07\19@115259 by Ron Wilcox

flavicon
face
Thanks, Ross:
That's exactly the info I was looking for.
Happy trails,
Ron


National Aeronautics and                Ron Wilcox
Space Administration                    Flight Operations Engineer

Dryden Flight Research Center           F-16XL Cranked Arrow Wing
PO Box 273 MS:  D2050                   X-36 Advanced Demonstrator
Edwards, CA 93523-0273                  Flight Termination Systems

EraseMEron.wilcoxspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTdfrc.nasa.gov                http://www.dfrc.nasa.gov

1997\07\19@120257 by stoney

flavicon
face
----------
> From: Ron Wilcox <rwilcoxspamspam_OUTQNET.COM>
> To: @spam@PICLISTKILLspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Subject: Re: PCB & Schematic
> Date: Saturday, July 19, 1997 10:53 AM
>
> Thanks, Ross:
> That's exactly the info I was looking for.
> Happy trails,
> Ron
>
>
> National Aeronautics and                Ron Wilcox
> Space Administration                    Flight Operations Engineer
>
> Dryden Flight Research Center           F-16XL Cranked Arrow Wing
> PO Box 273 MS:  D2050                   X-36 Advanced Demonstrator
> Edwards, CA 93523-0273                  Flight Termination Systems
>
> KILLspamron.wilcoxKILLspamspamdfrc.nasa.gov                http://www.dfrc.nasa.gov

Has anybody tried ezpc. It is available for ohio automation and I beleive
they a version that runns under 95 I would perfer to use the dos version
myself

mike johnston

1997\07\19@121508 by Gerald Lewis

flavicon
face
snip>  Having used all of the mentioned packages at various client
companies, I finally came across an integrated Schematic / PCB package at a
Major Medical Equipment. Manuf.  It was called Eagle by Cadsoft and the
company is located in Fla.  It was so good and inexpensive, I purchased four
for myself and my contractors.  The fact that it is inexpensive, less than
$1500 for the 32 bit version, is less impressive than the included gridless
fully interactive autorouter which is superior to programs costing 10K or
more.  They generally run full page ads in Mags as EDN etc.  The package can
also be networked if you have more than one user at a specific location.  My
hats off to this program.
The program also automatically provides all the Gerber and other types of
PCB required files.


Gerald Lewis   GJL Prototech, Inc.   RemoveMEk2mfhTakeThisOuTspamworldnet.att.net

1997\07\20@014050 by Mike Smith

flavicon
face
From: Andy Kunz <spamBeGonemontanaspamBeGonespamFAST.NET>
To: TakeThisOuTPICLISTEraseMEspamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU <RemoveMEPICLISTspamTakeThisOuTMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Date: Saturday, 19 July 1997 23:08
Subject: Re: PCB & Schematic



>At 09:35 PM 7/18/97 -0700, you wrote:
>>I'm interested in buying PCB and Schematic Capture software for work.  The
>>two I've heard about but not sure if they are any good is Protel and Orcad
>>(Win95).  Anyone have any experience (good or bad) with either or
something
>>else?  I'd appreciate any comments to help me decide.  I have about $6K to
>>spend.
>
>My one customer refers to Protel as "Pro-Hell" if that's any indication.

If they are talking about the Windows version, I second that!!  Its slow,
expensive, and very non-intuitive.

The DOS based autotrax is, well, satisfactory at best.  As someone else
said, they stopped supporting it years ago, and this shows up mostly in the
video driver area - it seems to stop in the standard (not SVGA) area of EGA.
Sure, there are some specially written drivers for old boards, but nothing
remotely up to date, like PCI cards.   If they'd gone the extra step and
produced a VESA driver...

There's one called TraxMaker, approx 5-600 dollars, runs on Win32
platforms.  Can't say anything about printing, as I've only seen demo
Check site <http://www.microcode.com>

MikeS
<mikesmith_ozEraseMEspam.....relaymail.net>

1997\07\20@091558 by Andrew Russell Morris

picon face
At 06:10 AM 7/19/97 -0700, you wrote:
>I really like Tango, it was very easy to use and gets the job done. But I'm
>in the minority.
>
I bought a copy of Tango and find it very easy to use, but since I use
Orcad every day at work (their choise, not mine), I also use Orcad for my
consulting work at home. Orcad is much more complex than it needs to be,
but its complexity has been hidden by the user interface. Note: I'm talking
about the DOS versions, here. Tango, for instance, puts your schematic in
one file. Whatever libraries are used to create the schematic become part
of the .sch file. Orcad creates a whole directory of files just for the
schematic, although you can archive the schematic, which incorporates the
libraries. I only use the schematic capture portion of the programs. I have
the entire Tango package and have tried out the PCB layout software and it
seems to work well and is easy to use. I've never used the Orcad PCB layout
software. I hand my designs at work over to someone else for layout.

1997\07\20@122832 by Steve Smith

picon face
I use orcad SDT386 all the time and its nothing short of execlent. Not used
the PCB package but the interface to other packages is reasonably friendly
and my pcb layout person reads the netlists ok


Steve............

1997\07\20@212537 by rzeff

flavicon
face
I'd highly recommend Pads PowerPCB / PowerLogic.  I've been using it
for 10 years or so.  It's very powerful and stable.

<http://www.pads.com>

Regards,
Robert Zeff
Nikola Engineering
EraseMErzeffspamNikola.com
http://Nikola.com
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Free Windows 95 / NT Spice Circuit Simulator
Free Windows 95 / NT Filter design tools




On Friday, July 18, 1997 9:36 PM, Ron Wilcox [SMTP:RemoveMErwilcoxEraseMEspamEraseMEQNET.COM] wrote:
{Quote hidden}

1997\07\21@093918 by John Shreffler

flavicon
face
part 0 1013 bytes
Although I have not tried either, I hear nothing but good comments on PADS and
TANGO.

-----Original Message-----
From:   Ron Wilcox [SMTP:RemoveMErwilcoxTakeThisOuTspamspamQNET.COM]
Sent:   Saturday, July 19, 1997 12:36 AM
To:     EraseMEPICLISTspamspamspamBeGoneMITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject:        PCB & Schematic

I'm interested in buying PCB and Schematic Capture software for work.  The
two I've heard about but not sure if they are any good is Protel and Orcad
(Win95).  Anyone have any experience (good or bad) with either or something
else?  I'd appreciate any comments to help me decide.  I have about $6K to
spend.

Happy trails,
Ron
National Aeronautics and                       Ron Wilcox
Space Administration                    Flight Operations Engineer

Dryden Flight Research Center           F-16XL Cranked Arrow Wing
PO Box 273                         X-36 Advanced Tactical Demonstrator
MS:  D2050                              Flight Termination Systems
Edwards, CA 93523-0273
email:  RemoveMEron.wilcoxKILLspamspamdfrc.nasa.gov         http://www.dfrc.nasa.gov

1997\07\21@200448 by Alex I. Torres

flavicon
face
  Hi All PICers !

I use OrCad since 198?, now I use orcad SDT386+ (DOS) and
sometimes OrCad Capture for Windows (6.0).

OrCad is  execlent! But I not use the PCB package - for
this I use Master Designer (P-CAD) /4.5 and 8.5 version/
Its very easy to generate pcadnlt-format netlist from
OrCad and then use p-cad's router and pcb-editor (pccards).


  Best Wishes, Alex Torres.
  Kharkov, Ukraine, exUSSR.
  E-Mail To : altorSTOPspamspamspam_OUTcook.kharkov.ua   via InterNet
              or 2:461/28             via FidoNet

--- GoldED 2.50.A0531+

1997\07\22@100120 by myke predko

flavicon
face
I just wanted to give everyone my impressions of "QCAD" (it was mentioned a
few weeks ago) - I've played around with the demo for the past two weeks and
I've got a few comments to make on it.

1.  It does exactly what I want it to do for quick and easy PIC Designs
(where I don't want to spend a lot of time doing a schematic capture).  The
interface is drop the component and then indicate what it is wired to.

2.  OR you can take the netlist out of your favourite schematic capture tool
and drop the components down.  It seems to take all the popular netlist
formats.

3.  Cost is $99 USD (Payable on the 'net) for 700 Pins, $195 for 1,000 and
so on.  There is a free demo you can download which will do 700 pins.  It
seems to be the 700 pin version with data output disabled.

The bad stuff:

1.  The user interface is not terifically intuitive or useful in many cases.
I ended up going to the software generated netlist to change things (because
it was easier than using the layout interface).

The user interface is also a bit bizarre.  If it were ported to a Windows
Interface with "Standard" mouse movement, it would be a lot better.

I was never able to figure out how to hand route traces.

2.  The autorouter is no where as good as it is advertised.  This is
exacerbated by the poor component libraries (see 3.).

The example given looks complex and does autoroute very quickly...  BUT any
time I tried a design I had to:  1.  move components around,  2.  expand the
board size.  I found that I got better with figuring out where to place
components for better routing and this improved the time required.

My design point was for simple PIC boards with two connectors and a few
discretes was no vias.

I found that if I didn't get a route with no vias in less than a minute, I
never would.

Something that really surprised me was, moving components by small amounts
(say 0.010") for better component-to-component clearance could cause big
problems with the autoroute (even if I made sure there was lots of room for
the traces that were around the component to go around).

3.  An advertising point was that the software came with complete component
package libraries.  This is a big lie.  I found that I had to edit the
libraries considerably to get traces to go in between pins (both for PTH and
SMT).

As well, for many simple components (ie "D-Shell" Connectors), I had to make
up the libraries myself.

4.  There is no documentation.  There is a FAQ package, but it is worse than
useless.  The only way you're going to learn about QCAD is if you play
around with it yourself (maybe somebody can explain to me how to route
traces manually).

5.  There is a phone number here in Toronto for support.  I wasn't
impressed.  The support is the guy who wrote it and his english is very
poor.  He really wasn't interested in explaining how to use the program and
talk about the gerber output (which I consider to be very important).

6.  The quality of the routed traces isn't that great.  To be fair, I
haven't let it run for eight hours to see what comes out.  But, I have let
it run for an hour without any improvements.


So, while it works in a manner that I would like for my simple designs, it
doesn't jump out at me enough to drop $140 Canadian.

myke

{Quote hidden}

"If at first you don't succeed, then maybe sky diving isn't the sport for
you" - Steve Smith

1997\07\23@000814 by blunn

flavicon
face
Bob Lunn
07/23/97 02:06 PM


> The DOS based autotrax is, well, satisfactory at best.
> As someone else said, they stopped supporting it years
> ago, and this shows up mostly in the video driver area
> - it seems to stop in the standard (not SVGA) area of
> EGA. Sure, there are some specially written drivers for
> old boards, but nothing remotely up to date, like PCI
> cards.   If they'd gone the extra step and produced a
> VESA driver...

    Well, I've used Autotrax for DOS for ten years now.
    I've laid out some very complex boards using fine
    pitch surface mount components, as well as 'standard'
    through-hole (but still complex) boards.

    I've *not* done multi-layer boards.  Nor do I bother
    with the auto-router (though I sometimes use the
    auto-router in 'manual' mode).

    As well, I use Autotrax to do all my schematics and
    engineering drawings (I've created quite extensive
    libraries of the necessary symbols).

    I have found Autotrax to be convenient, fast, and
    easy to use for my purposes.

    With regard to video drivers.  My copy of Autotrax
    has a perfectly good SVGA driver that has worked
    inside a DOS box under Windows 3.11 on every
    computer I have used over the past five years.
    This includes Pentiums with PCI video cards.

    The only complaint I've had about Autotrax was
    the 'crippled' output to printers (as compared to
    the high quality output to plotters).  I've overcome
    this by using a shareware package that converts
    HPGL to direct printer output.

    On a laser printer the result is camera-ready copy.

___Bob

1997\07\23@081406 by in Harris & Alison Smith

picon face
<snip>
{Quote hidden}

<snip>
Hi all,
I just thought l would put my 2 cents worth in.
I am using Protel Easytrax on a Pentium with PCI  video
with no problems (no dos box).
The only problem is printing with Easyplot.
The work-around for me is to either
A-  start up in Dos mode
B-  Use the demo copy of Protel 2.7 for windows l
downloaded from http://www.protel.com
Using 2.7 l can print direct to the laser and it seems to
all work quite well, Just can't save any changes.
All my boards are single sided and my Printed circuit man is happy
with the Artwork l supply.
I do all my prototype boards myself. Using protel 2.7 the output
is sent to the fax (winfax lite) and with winfax saved as a file
Then its only a matter of exporting to a paint package,
reversing colours and placing in a Desk top package.
And thats how l make my negatives.
Hope this is of some use to someone, it works for me.

All the best

Kevin Harris

1997\07\23@120514 by stoney

flavicon
face
----------
{Quote hidden}

I've got easytrax and there is not driver to support a Hp deskjet 550
anybody Know were I could get or make a driver for It?
Mike Johnston

1997\07\24@014254 by David Gould

flavicon
face
> Bob Lunn <@spam@blunn@spam@spamspam_OUTKEYCORP.COM> writes:
...
>      As well, I use Autotrax to do all my schematics and
>      engineering drawings (I've created quite extensive
>      libraries of the necessary symbols).

If these are not proprietary, would you consider sharing them?

>      I have found Autotrax to be convenient, fast, and
>      easy to use for my purposes.

Based on your recommendation I installed and tried Autotrax. It is just
about right, not too complex for me to get buried in the learning curve,
price can't be beat, and powerful enough to do what I need. Thanks!

>      With regard to video drivers.  My copy of Autotrax
>      has a perfectly good SVGA driver that has worked
>      inside a DOS box under Windows 3.11 on every
>      computer I have used over the past five years.
>      This includes Pentiums with PCI video cards.

How could I get the SVGA driver? This would be a really helpful addition.

>      The only complaint I've had about Autotrax was
>      the 'crippled' output to printers (as compared to
>      the high quality output to plotters).  I've overcome
>      this by using a shareware package that converts
>      HPGL to direct printer output.
>      On a laser printer the result is camera-ready copy.

What program is this? Where did you find it?

-dg

David Gould            spamBeGonedgspamKILLspamillustra.com           510.628.3783 or 510.305.9468
Informix Software                       300 Lakeside Drive  Oakland, CA 94612
- I realize now that irony has no place in business communications.

1997\07\24@042634 by Mike Smith

flavicon
face
{Quote hidden}

What resolution?  640 x 480 is *not* SVGA IMO.  Needs to be 800 x 600 or
1024 x 768 to qualify.  If you've got a real, generic, SVGA, can you give
more details?

MikeS
<.....mikesmith_ozspam_OUTspamrelaymail.net>

1997\07\24@043710 by Mike Smith

flavicon
face
<snop>
>>      The only complaint I've had about Autotrax was
>>      the 'crippled' output to printers (as compared to
>>      the high quality output to plotters).  I've overcome
>>      this by using a shareware package that converts
>>      HPGL to direct printer output.
>>      On a laser printer the result is camera-ready copy.

I was reading some newsgroups that suggested lasers were bad gnus for pcb
artwork - they are fine in one dimension, but owing to the high possibility
of roller slippage, bad in the other.   You could probably compensate on a
s/s board, but d/s or multilayer?

MikeS
<TakeThisOuTmikesmith_oz.....spamTakeThisOuTrelaymail.net>

1997\07\24@050251 by Keith Dowsett

flavicon
face
At 18:09 24/07/97 +0930, Mike wrote:

<snip>

>>>      On a laser printer the result is camera-ready copy.
>
>I was reading some newsgroups that suggested lasers were bad gnus for pcb
>artwork - they are fine in one dimension, but owing to the high possibility
>of roller slippage, bad in the other.   You could probably compensate on a
>s/s board, but d/s or multilayer?

Whenever you print a PCB outline it's always worth adding dimension bars in
both directions. Just add a set of tracks 1" apart outside the board area.
On a 5" board you can check that you are within 1% (.05") just using a ruler.

Hope this helps,

Keith.
==========================================================
Keith Dowsett         "Variables won't; constants aren't."

E-mail: TakeThisOuTkdowsettKILLspamspamspamrpms.ac.uk
  WWW: http://kd.rpms.ac.uk/index.htm

1997\07\24@101703 by Joe Little

flavicon
face
    At 18:09 24/07/97 +0930, Mike wrote:
    <snip>
    >>>      On a laser printer the result is camera-ready copy. >
    >I was reading some newsgroups that suggested lasers were bad gnus for pcb
    >artwork - they are fine in one dimension, but owing to the high
    possibility >of roller slippage, bad in the other.   You could probably
    compensate on a >s/s board, but d/s or multilayer?


    *********
    Unless the printer is pretty ragged out, the major error is caused by the
    paper stretching, and shrinking as it's heated to 9000 deg in the fuser.

    There are Gerber View/Edit programs (http://WWW.ECAM.com/) that allow you
    to scale the X and Y dims independently.  This allows you to compensate a
    little for the error that a laser printer adds.  Draw something like a 6
    inch by 6 inch square with your PWB CAD program.  Generate the Gerber file,
    print it, and measure it after the paper cools.

    Figure out how much stretch you need in each direction, and use those
    numbers as scaling factors in the Gerber edit software.  Print again, and
    Vola! Still not perfect, but an improvement.

    (Still, It's hard to beat AP Circuits (http://www.apcircuits.com/).  Just
    email the Gerber files, and get a board with plated thru holes in a few
    days.)

    Joe

1997\07\24@114722 by Reginald Neale

flavicon
face
> <snop>
>>>      The only complaint I've had about Autotrax was
>>>      the 'crippled' output to printers (as compared to
>>>      the high quality output to plotters).  I've overcome
>>>      this by using a shareware package that converts
>>>      HPGL to direct printer output.
>>>      On a laser printer the result is camera-ready copy.
>
>I was reading some newsgroups that suggested lasers were bad gnus for pcb
>artwork - they are fine in one dimension, but owing to the high possibility
>of roller slippage, bad in the other.   You could probably compensate on a
>s/s board, but d/s or multilayer?
>
>MikeS
><.....mikesmith_ozspamRemoveMErelaymail.net>

If your dimensions are not super-critical and your board is not large,
laser printing an enlarged copy -- at least 2X -- and asking your service
bureau to photo-reduce it when making the film tool is quite feasible. My
layout package allows me to print a ruler along the edges. This makes it
possible to measure any differential between the horizontal and vertical
scales, and to get at least one of them exactly right, by instructing the
service bureau to "reduce this dimension to exactly XX inches."

Reg Neale

1997\07\24@201249 by blchfldt

flavicon
face
> >>     With regard to video drivers.  My copy of Autotrax
> >>     has a perfectly good SVGA driver that has worked
> >>     inside a DOS box under Windows 3.11 on every
> >>     computer I have used over the past five years.
> >>     This includes Pentiums with PCI video cards.
>
> What resolution?  640 x 480 is *not* SVGA IMO.  Needs to be 800 x 600 or
> 1024 x 768 to qualify.  If you've got a real, generic, SVGA, can you give
> more details?
>
> MikeS
> <RemoveMEmikesmith_ozspamspamBeGonerelaymail.net>

When I used Autotrax a couple of years ago, I used the Eizo800 driver, with
an ET4000 graphics adaptor. I think most standard GFX-adaptors works with
this 800*600 driver, but my current adaptor (Matrox Millenium 4MB) doesn't.


Rgds.
Jacob Blichfeldt
spamBeGoneblchfldt@spam@spamspam_OUTpost3.tele.dk

1997\07\24@203202 by John Payson

flavicon
face
> What resolution?  640 x 480 is *not* SVGA IMO.  Needs to be 800 x 600 or
> 1024 x 768 to qualify.  If you've got a real, generic, SVGA, can you give
> more details?

Many older VGA-compatible cards (including the original VGA) could be
programmed for 800x600x16 mode; better still, they could (nearly) all do
it the exact same way.  Unfortunately, the resulting display would only
scan at about 56Hz (ugh!) and some monitors didn't really like the display
timings.  In addition, some newer cards have trouble with that mode
because of the different ways they handle frame-rate programming.

If support is available for a particular display card, that special
support will often work better than the "generic" methods.  For example, a
BIOS call to set screen mode will be more reliable than direct hardware
manipulation (even though the latter would work on a larger variety of
older cards).  If such support is not available, however, "generic" SVGA
800x600 drivers may still work.  I think one of the drivers in the
Easytrax distribution fell into this category; unfortunately, I forget
which one.

1997\07\27@213031 by blunn

flavicon
face
Bob Lunn
07/28/97 11:30 AM


> What resolution?  640 x 480 is *not* SVGA IMO.  Needs
> to be 800 x 600 or 1024 x 768 to qualify.  If you've
> got a real, generic, SVGA, can you give more details?

    I was wrong.  I'm currently running Autotrax
    in VGA (640 x 480) mode in a DOS box.

    As far as I can determine, there is no SVGA
    (800 x 600) mode driver available.

___Bob

1997\07\27@214521 by blunn

flavicon
face
Bob Lunn
07/28/97 11:46 AM


{Quote hidden}

    Inconsistent dimensioning in the x and y directions is
    certainly not unique to laser printers.  All 'useable'
    printing and plotting packages allow you to trim the
    scaling to improve the output fidelity.

    Nevertheless, I would never expect a 1x output plot to
    be satisfactory for pcb production.  At a minimum I would
    use 2x plots, and 4x plots if possible.  All plots would
    include a scaling ruler of the form "reduce to 1.50 inches"
    along each axis.

    At least as important as the output device is the medium
    used.  Dimensional variations due to temperature and
    humidity changes can be substantial.

    Having said all this, it is actually many years since I
    have bothered creating pcb plots myself.  The cost of
    photoplotters is now so low that any pcb production house
    worth using has its own equipment.  Further, within Aus-
    tralia everybody happily accepts Autotrax format files.
    So I don't even need to worry about creating Gerber files.
    This is convenient, as I don't need to hassle with tool
    description files, etc.

___Bob

1997\07\27@214934 by blunn

flavicon
face
Bob Lunn
07/28/97 11:50 AM


>>      The only complaint I've had about Autotrax was
>>      the 'crippled' output to printers.  I've overcome
>>      this by using a shareware package that converts
>>      HPGL to direct printer output.
>
> What program is this? Where did you find it?

    The program is called 'printgld' (being 'printgl' for
    dos).  If you go to 'oak.oakland.edu' and search
    you'll find it easily.  The latest version they have
    is 1.58 (personally, I'm still running 1.50).

___Bob

1997\07\30@103734 by lilel

flavicon
face
> > Bob Lunn <TakeThisOuTblunnspamspamKEYCORP.COM> writes:

> Based on your recommendation I installed and tried Autotrax. It is
> just about right, not too complex for me to get buried in the
> learning curve, price can't be beat, and powerful enough to do what
> I need. Thanks!

Where is it available?  What price?
-- Lawrence Lile

Download AutoCad blocks for electrical drafting at:
http://members.sockets.net/~llile/index.htm

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 1997 , 1998 only
- Today
- New search...