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PICList Thread
'ROACHES AND CRICKETS!!'
2000\03\10@004940 by Mario I. Arguello

picon face
I am interested in device that uses a pic chip, sort of robot that will work
at nbight time to lock, kill and clean up pesky insects when they crawl
inside the garage.

Any thoughts?

Mario

2000\03\10@110908 by Dan Michaels

flavicon
face
At 12:48 AM 3/10/00 EST, you wrote:
>I am interested in device that uses a pic chip, sort of robot that will work
>at nbight time to lock, kill and clean up pesky insects when they crawl
>inside the garage.
>
>Any thoughts?
>Mario
>

I would also like a tiny robot with a laser beam attached to do
this kind of "clean-up" work. But could you possibly use ultrasonic
waves to keep the roaches from entering in the first place? I've
heard this works.

- Dan Michaels
Oricom Technologies
http://www.sni.net/~oricom
==========================

2000\03\10@170935 by TIM

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face
we tried the ultra sonic repeller and lo to behold  ..their was fecies on
the xmitter module .
my guess is they got close enough to fecies themselves........haven't seem
them since..tim
{Original Message removed}

2000\03\10@190726 by Mario I. Arguello

picon face
In a message dated 3/10/00 10:11:05 AM Central Standard Time,
spam_OUToricomTakeThisOuTspamLYNX.SNI.NET writes:

<< At 12:48 AM 3/10/00 EST, you wrote:
>I am interested in device that uses a pic chip, sort of robot that will work
>at nbight time to lock, kill and clean up pesky insects when they crawl
>inside the garage.
>
>Any thoughts?
>Mario
>

I would also like a tiny robot with a laser beam attached to do
this kind of "clean-up" work. But could you possibly use ultrasonic
waves to keep the roaches from entering in the first place? I've
heard this works. >>

Well, there are various methods but I want a sentinel robot exterminator. If
no thoughts from others, I will have to build the robot myself but I have no
idea about PIC programing so any ideas are welcomed.

Mario

2000\03\10@191954 by Mario I. Arguello

picon face
In a message dated 3/10/00 4:09:33 PM Central Standard Time,
.....stm800KILLspamspam@spam@CITY-NET.COM writes:

<< we tried the ultra sonic repeller and lo to behold  ..their was fecies on
the xmitter module .
my guess is they got close enough to fecies themselves........haven't seem
them since..tim >>

What type of ultrasonic unit is this and I am wondering if it will be
effective with the crickets and sewer roaches we have in Arizona.
Mario

2000\03\10@201250 by Andrew Hooper

flavicon
face
There are several problems i can see you having, Power being one
ok you can use solar power but what are you going to do at night?

and if you use rechargeable's and charge them with the sunlight
then you have another problem, weight and size.

What do you want it to do the the roach/cricket?, chase it or kill it?
if you wnat it to kill it then it will more than likley be a spike that
skewers the roack/cricket.. then you will need to make some
kind of sensor so it can determine the difference from a toe and
a roach.

You could use a heat sensor, but do roaches and crickets give off heat?

I did however see some information posted about a new CCD chip that
would do what you want, have not managed to find any further info or referal
sites as yet, but if such a chip is in existance im sure its going to be
handy.


------- CCD Chip Info ------
French firm offers $6 vision system-on-a-chip
By R. Colin Johnson
EE Times
(03/09/00, 09:45:27 AM EDT)

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. ( ChipWire) -- A French technology research company
has unwrapped a vision-processing system-on-a-chip that it claims can be
manufactured as inexpensively as a microcontroller. The $6 Generic Visual
Perception Processor (GVPP) can automatically detect objects and track their
movement in real-time, according to Bureau d'Etudes Vision (BEV).

The rights to manufacture the GVPP will be up for grabs at a technology
auction slated for next month. If properly commercialized, auctioneers
PriceWaterhouseCoopers LLP estimate a multibillion-dollar gross revenue
stream for the GVPP based on 100 proposed applications in 10 industries.

"We couldn't manage multiple licenses to competing companies," said Nabeel
Al-Adsani, director of operations at BEV. "Instead, we hope to interest
major semiconductor manufacturers in licensing the GVPP so that they can
supply the application-specific companies with chips."

The GVPP, which crunches 20 billion instructions per second (bips), models
the human perceptual process at the hardware level by mimicking the separate
temporal and spatial functions of the eye-to-brain system. The processor
sees its environment as a stream of histograms regarding the location and
velocity of objects. Those objects could be the white lines on a highway,
the footballin a televised game or the annotated movement of enemy ground
forces from satellite telemetry.

Alongside a CMOS imager on its 2-x-4-inch evaluation board, the GVPP has
been demonstrated as capable of learning-in-place to solve a variety of
pattern recognition problems. It boasts automatic normalization for varying
object size, orientation and lighting conditions, and can function in
daylight or darkness.

A complete GVPP system including the charge-coupled device and all support
circuitry should cost less than $50, the company said. BEV also claimed that
the software it provides with the chips permits engineers to develop
applications for the GVPP in just a few weeks.

The GVPP was invented in 1992, when BEV founder Patric Pirim saw that it
would be relatively simple for a CMOS chip to implement in hardware the
separate contributions of temporal and spatial processing in the brain. The
brain-eye system uses layers of parallel-processing neurons that pass the
signal through a series of preprocessing steps, resulting in real-time
tracking of multiple moving objects within a visual scene.

Pirim created a chip architecture that mimicked the work of the neurons,
with the help of multiplexing and memory. The result is an inexpensive
device that can autonomously "perceive" and then track up to eight
user-specified objects in a video stream based on hue, luminance,
saturation, spatial orientation, speed and direction of motion, the company
claims .

The GVPP tracks an "object," defined as a certain set of hue, luminance and
saturation values in a specific shape, from frame to frame in a video stream
by anticipating where its leading and trailing edges make "differences" with
the background. That means it can track an object through varying light
sources or changes in size, as when an object gets closer to the viewer or
moves farther away.

The chip houses 23 neural blocks, both temporal and spatial, each consisting
of 20 hardware input and output "synaptic" connections. The GVPP multiplexes
this neural hardware with off-chip scratchpad memory to simulate as many as
100,000 synaptic connections per neuron. Each of these synapses can be
changed through the on-chip microprocessor for a combined processing total
of over 6.2 billion synaptic connections per second.

In executing up to 20 bips to analyze successive frames of a video stream,
the temporal neurons identify pixels that have changed over time and
generate a 3-bit value indicative of the magnitude of that change. The
spatial-processing system analyzes the resulting "difference" histogram to
calculate the speed and direction of the motion.

The GVPP's major performance strength over current-day $10,000 vision
systems is its automatic adaptation to varying lighting conditions. Today's
vision systems dictate uniform, shadowless illumination, and even
next-generation prototype systems, designed to work under "normal" lighting
conditions, can be used only from dawn to dusk. The GVPP, on the other hand,
adapts to real-time changes in lighting without recalibration, day or night.

Since processing in each module on the GVPP runs in parallel out of its own
memory space, multiple GVPP chips can be cascaded to expand the number of
objects that can be recognized and tracked. When set in master-slave mode,
any number of GVPP chips can divide and conquer, for instance, complex
stereoscopic vision applications.

On the software side, a host operating system running on an external PC
communicates with the GVPP's evaluation board via an OS kernel within the
on-chip microprocessor. BEV dubs the neural-learning capability of its
development environment "programming by seeing and doing," because of its
ease of use. The engineer needs no knowledge of the internal workings of the
GVPP, the company said, only application-specific domain knowledge.

"Programming the GVPP is as simple as setting a few registers, and then
testing the results to gauge the application's success," said Steve Rowe,
BEV's director of research and development. "Once debugged, these tiny
application programs are loaded directly into the GVPP's internal ROM."

Application programs themselves can use C++, which makes calls to a library
of assembly language algorithms for visual perception and tracking of
objects. The system's modular approach permits the developer to create a
hierarchy of application building blocks that simplify problems with
inheritable software characteristics.

"Simple applications can be quickly prototyped in a few days, with
medium-size applications taking a few weeks and even big applications
only a
couple of months," said Rowe.

In applications, each pixel may be described with respect to any of the six
domains of information available to it: hue, luminance, saturation, speed,
direction of motion and spatial orientation. The GVPP further subcategorizes
pixels by ranges, for instance luminance within 10% and 65%, hue of blue,
saturation between 20% and 25% and moving upward in scene.

A set of second-level pattern recognition commands permits the GVPP to
search for different objects in different parts of the scene -- for
instance, to look for a closed eyelid only within the rectangle bordered by
the corners of the eye. Since some applications may also require multiple
levels of recognition, the GVPP has software hooks to pass along the
recognition task from level to level.

For instance, to detect when a driver is falling asleep -- a capability that
could find use in California, which is about to mandate that cars sound an
"alarm" when drowsy drivers begin to nod off --the GVPP is first programmed
to detect the driver's head, for which it creates histograms of head
movement. The microprocessor reads these histograms to identify the area for
the eye.

Then the recognition task passes to the next level, which searches only
within the eye area rectangles. High-speed movement there, normally
indicative of blinking, is discounted, but when blinks become slower
than a
predetermined level, they are interpreted as the driver nodding off, and
trigger an alarm.

Pirim has long-term plans out to 2006 for the GVPP. "We have a very clear
set of upgrades to take advantage of putting more transistors onto our
system-on-a-chip," said Pirim.

First, a CMOS imager will be integrated on-chip with the GVPP, enabling
watch-size vision systems by 2002. After that, Pirim plans to integrate
flash memory that will enable a system the size of a pinkie ring by 2004.
And by 2006, Pirim has slated an expanded on-chip DRAM plus beefed up
on-chip processing to solve multisensor fusion applications in hat-pin-size
vision systems.

Application-specific software libraries are also planned, including optical
character recognition, 3-D analysis and spatial organization.

BEV lists possible applications for the GVPP in process monitoring, quality
control and assembly; automotive systems such as intelligent air bags that
monitor passenger size and traffic congestion monitors; pedestrian
detection, license plate recognition, electronic toll collection, automatic
parking management, automatic inspection; and medical uses including disease
identification. The chip could also prove useful in unmanned air vehicles,
miniature smart weapons, ground reconnaissance and other military
applications, as well as in security access using facial, iris, fingerprint,
or height and gait identification.
--


{Original Message removed}

2000\03\11@125708 by Mario I. Arguello

picon face
In a message dated 3/10/00 7:13:04 PM Central Standard Time,
andrewspamKILLspamBEST.NET.NZ writes:

<< There are several problems i can see you having, Power being one
ok you can use solar power but what are you going to do at night?

and if you use rechargeable's and charge them with the sunlight
then you have another problem, weight and size.

What do you want it to do the the roach/cricket?, chase it or kill it?
if you wnat it to kill it then it will more than likley be a spike that
skewers the roack/cricket.. then you will need to make some
kind of sensor so it can determine the difference from a toe and
a roach.

You could use a heat sensor, but do roaches and crickets give off heat? >>



The unit can be powered by rechargeable batteries. Stamby, should not use a
lot of power except for motion (move towards the insect and kill).

I want the robot to do three things,  1) Sence the insect, 2) lock up on it
(if there are more than one insect, lock up on the closest one) 3) Kill.

1) Could be done with some type of motion sensor to keep it simple. The robot
can be programmed to monitor a specific area,  I am thinking of an optic eye
to cover a specific area similar to a lawn sprinkler where you can dial
(program) a 1/4 pie, half pie or full circle coverage.

2) Once it locks up on the intruder, then lock up on it and get close to it.

3) Exterminate it. Either by spraying DW40 :) or similar poison or simply
sucking it up into a disposable reservoir that can be discarded when full.

Better yet,  forget all of the above and build an electronic roach motel.
Atract them to a box where tthey can feast on poisoned food and die. Dispose
of the box and pop a new one.

I suppose another thing I could do is crop spray them with a poison with my
micro helicopter that I often fly inside my garage.:) Living in Ariazona
specially in the summer time these insects are a nuasaince.

Mario
http://www.micro-flight.com

2000\03\11@131154 by Dan Michaels

flavicon
face
>
>Better yet,  forget all of the above and build an electronic roach motel.
>Atract them to a box where tthey can feast on poisoned food and die. Dispose
>of the box and pop a new one.
>
>I suppose another thing I could do is crop spray them with a poison with my
>micro helicopter that I often fly inside my garage.:) Living in Ariazona
>specially in the summer time these insects are a nuasaince.
>
>Mario
>http://www.micro-flight.com
>

Mario,

The roach hotel idea is good, but it needs to be more hi-tech than
simply poisoning them. It needs to have 3-4 small entry doors, each
having a visual sensor, accompanied by some motorized termination
device. I favor a little arm with super-glue on the end, that comes
down, sticks the roach, and dumps it in a roach burial container.
Hi-tech, very clean, and no nasty poisons for the cat to eat. Easily
controlled by a PIC.

- Dan Michaels
Oricom Technologies

2000\03\11@231008 by engalt

picon face
Solder two black wires to one end the PIC and stick them out like antennas, hook
1,000 Volts between two of the pins on the other end, and stand it up in the
corner of your garage.  Every time a roach mistakes your PIC for a female roach
and tries to mate with it it will be zapped.

Dan Michaels wrote:

{Quote hidden}

2000\03\11@234323 by Jeffrey D Spears

flavicon
face
How about a mirror pointed IR laser. Either heat up the little critter
or make it go blind! Use those little IR lasers with the big warning signs.

On Sat, 11 Mar 2000, Brian kraut wrote:

{Quote hidden}

Jeffrey D. Spears
University of Michigan
College of Engineering

``Double-E, can't spell gEEk without it!''
                       -Captain Gerald M. Bloomfield II, USMC
                        (my brother)

2000\03\12@121617 by Dan Michaels

flavicon
face
Jeffrey D. Spears wrote:
>
>How about a mirror pointed IR laser. Either heat up the little critter
>or make it go blind! Use those little IR lasers with the big warning signs.
>

Speaking of which, TI has a chip with 500,000 digitally-controlled
MEMS mirrors, so you've got a way to control the laser beam:

http://www.ti.com/dlp

The PIC could aim the beam, and also make sure it doesn't hit anything
larger than a bug. Worst thing imaginable is a blind cat.

- Dan Michaels
Oricom Technologies
http://www.sni.net/~oricom
==========================

2000\03\12@125800 by Mario I. Arguello

picon face
In a message dated 3/11/00 12:11:53 PM Central Standard Time,
.....oricomKILLspamspam.....LYNX.SNI.NET writes:

<< The roach hotel idea is good, but it needs to be more hi-tech than
simply poisoning them. It needs to have 3-4 small entry doors, each
having a visual sensor, accompanied by some motorized termination
device. I favor a little arm with super-glue on the end, that comes
down, sticks the roach, and dumps it in a roach burial container.
Hi-tech, very clean, and no nasty poisons for the cat to eat. Easily
controlled by a PIC. >>

Sounds to me like a good idea. I just need to find out what would atract
these nasty insects to the sticky chamber.


Mario

2000\03\13@115803 by jamesnewton

face picon face
Guys, this is off topic. Please mark future post as
RE: ROACHES AND CRICKETS!![OT]

Thank you.

---
James Newton (PICList Admin #3)
EraseMEjamesnewtonspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTpiclist.com 1-619-652-0593
PIC/PICList FAQ: http://www.piclist.com or .org

{Original Message removed}

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