Searching \ for 'Prototyping surface mount PICS' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/microchip/devices.htm?key=pic
Search entire site for: 'Prototyping surface mount PICS'.

Truncated match.
PICList Thread
'Prototyping surface mount PICS'
1998\07\08@134510 by lilel

flavicon
face
I'm working on a design that uses a surface mounted PIC.  As far as I
know, the only UV eraseable parts available are DIP packages.  I've
tried to cobble together an adapter that allows a DIP socket to be
soldered onto the surface mount pads, with little luck.

Surely you folks have run into this problem before.  How do you go
about testing, debugging and prototyping a surface mount design?



Best Regards,

Lawrence Lile

1998\07\08@160032 by Mark Willis

flavicon
face
I usually debug in DIP parts, just easier (I tend to wire-wrap
prototypes, am I dating myself here?).  Once it works right, then do
PCBs (or once I know the design's fixed & no extra parts needed.)

 Mark, spam_OUTmwillisTakeThisOuTspamnwlink.com

Lawrence Lile wrote:
{Quote hidden}

1998\07\08@161033 by David Sorlien

picon face
Emulation Technology ( http://www.emulation.com/ ) makes all kinds of
adapters for prototype development and programming. Their products are
very high quality, but EXTREMELY expensive. Since you are developing a
surface mount design, I assume this is for high volume production, in
which case the cost of an adapter should not be an issue.

For surface mount designs, try to use a 16F84. Add test points or a
header to the board for in circuit programming. If the '84 is not
suitable for the design, get an SMT-to-DIP adapter to use windowed PICs
or to interface to an ICE.

If you have room on the PCB, include patterns for both the SMT and DIP
parts.

Dave Sorlien

Lawrence Lile wrote:

> Surely you folks have run into this problem before.  How do you go
> about testing, debugging and prototyping a surface mount design?

1998\07\08@181421 by ephen Rothlisberger

picon face
Use a surface-mount DIP socket. Available from Digikey
(http://www.digikey.com/) and others. On your PCB include a land pattern
for the SOIC as well as for the bigger SM DIP socket. It'll take up a bit
of space, but you can have the one board do both.

Stephen.


>I'm working on a design that uses a surface mounted PIC.  As far as I
>know, the only UV eraseable parts available are DIP packages.  I've
>tried to cobble together an adapter that allows a DIP socket to be
>soldered onto the surface mount pads, with little luck.
>
>Surely you folks have run into this problem before.  How do you go
>about testing, debugging and prototyping a surface mount design?

1998\07\08@184519 by kirmse

flavicon
face
> Lawrence Lile wrote:
> >
> > I'm working on a design that uses a surface mounted PIC.  As far as I
> > know, the only UV eraseable parts available are DIP packages.  I've
> > tried to cobble together an adapter that allows a DIP socket to be
> > soldered onto the surface mount pads, with little luck.
> >
> > Surely you folks have run into this problem before.  How do you go
> > about testing, debugging and prototyping a surface mount design?
> >
> > Best Regards,
> >
> > Lawrence Lile


Ironwood Electronics Inc http://www.ironwoodelectronics.com/ makes some DIP to S
OIC
adaptors. They are somewhat pricey. I have used them. However, I have not been s
uccessfull
moving them from board to board.

My preference is to use 16CF8X parts. If only uChip would come out with their pr
oposed 44 pin
flash parts things would be perfect.

--

---------------------------------------------------------------------
| Dr. Kevin Dale Kirmse
| PhD Electrical Engineer
|
| King of Prussia, PA 19406
| .....kirmseKILLspamspam@spam@netaxs.com
---------------------------------------------------------------------

1998\07\09@072912 by Andy Kunz

flavicon
face
Here's the info:

Digi-Key P/N    A3250   Use for 18-pin adapter on the /JW side
               A3251   Use for 18-pin adapter on the PCB side
               A3252   Use for 28-pin adapter on the /JW side
               A3253   Use for 28-pin adapter on the PCB side

If anybody needs a PCB which does this, I got mine from Carmacon, but I
don't know if they are a stocked item or what.

Andy

==================================================================
                    Andy Kunz - Montana Design
                         I love deadlines.
            I especially like the whooshing sound they make
                       as they go flying by.
==================================================================

1998\07\09@091333 by Martin McCormick

flavicon
face
Lawrence Lile writes:
>Surely you folks have run into this problem before.  How do you go
>about testing, debugging and prototyping a surface mount design?

       This is an excellent question.  Please share your answers with
the list.

       Obviously, if one can find a socket that properly holds a PLCC
or other SMD, then conventional techniques can be used.  I was once
lucky enough to find a 52-lead PLCC socket for a Motorola 68HC11 plus
a nest of wire-wrap pins that would receive the socket and this worked
perfectly, but it is hard to get that lucky on a regular basis.

       I wonder if we are going to see the end of through-hole
technology because surface-mount construction is obviously a more
cost-effective way to build things?


Martin McCormick WB5AGZ  Stillwater, OK
OSU Center for Computing and Information Services Data Communications Group

1998\07\09@125559 by wwl

picon face
On Wed, 8 Jul 1998 12:13:00 +0000, you wrote:

>I'm working on a design that uses a surface mounted PIC.  As far as I
>know, the only UV eraseable parts available are DIP packages.  I've
>tried to cobble together an adapter that allows a DIP socket to be
>soldered onto the surface mount pads, with little luck.
>
>Surely you folks have run into this problem before.  How do you go
>about testing, debugging and prototyping a surface mount design?
>
>
>
>Best Regards,
>
>Lawrence Lile
This is probably the cheapest way of doing it, but still versatile and
durable....
I made up 2 identical leads, each consisting of a 0.05" pitch
single-row socket connected to a 0.1" pitch single-row turned-pin IC
socket strip, 14 ways. Use short (<4") very flexible ribbon (The
multi-colour IDC stuff is great).

You then just solder two 0.05" pitch pin strips (e.g. Samtec) to the
SO pads (vertically) - you can eather butt-joint them, or for a
stronger joint, bend over the last 1mm of the pin to form an L, the
base of which lays along the length of the SO pad.
If durability is important, cover the joint rows with plenty of epoxy.
Plug one of the ribbon leads onto each pinstrip. and the DIL chip
into the turned-pin sockets. Using 2 seperate cables means you only
need one pair for 20 and 28 pin chips & different pitch DILs, and the
spacing of the SO pinstrips isn't crucial.

Once you've made up the tricky part (the cables), subsequent use on
other designs is easy and very cheap - just a couple of expendable
pinstrips.

I made up a small PCB to break the 0.05" ribbon out to 0.1", but you
could do it manually and cover with hot-melt for strain-relief.
This method can also be used for PLCCs, but you really need to put the
4 socket strips on a PCB for alignment, and put the pinstrips in the
sockets to align them for soldering. Another small PCB to break the
ribbon out to the 40 pin DIL is also useful.

If you need further details, EMAIL me and I'll put a couple of photos
on a webpage & dig out the Samtec partnos for the connectors.
    ____                                                           ____
  _/ L_/  Mike Harrison / White Wing Logic / wwlspamKILLspamnetcomuk.co.uk  _/ L_/
_/ W_/  Hardware & Software design / PCB Design / Consultancy  _/ W_/
/_W_/  Industrial / Computer Peripherals / Hazardous Area      /_W_/

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 1998 , 1999 only
- Today
- New search...