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'Programmers WISP'
2000\04\23@230306 by Giles

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Ok, I am browsing programmers.. I found/saw this one called WISP.
I like it because it seems to have the ability to do production programming,
it uses a PIC in the circuit.
Now the draw back, the web site I saw it on did not seem to offer a circuit
board for it.
Is this programmer available commercially?  (or do I get to protoboard it)
Is it comparable to a ??? programmer?
How well is the software supported?
Is anyone using it?

Best regards,
Giles

2000\04\24@085739 by w. v. ooijen / f. hanneman

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> Ok, I am browsing programmers.. I found/saw this one called WISP.
> I like it because it seems to have the ability to do production
programming,
> it uses a PIC in the circuit.
> Now the draw back, the web site I saw it on did not seem to offer a
circuit
> board for it.

There is a PCB design, it should be on the web page.
Note that this programmer was designed for 16x84 programming,
but I used it succesfully with 16f877. It will never work with
a PIC that requires substantial current from the HVP.
AFAIK it is not available commercially.
I updated the (DOS) software to be compatible with the 16f877
my (new) WLoader 16f877 resident (boot) loader.
It is planned that I make an elektuur-article about WISP,
including PCB design, sometime later this year.
The DOS software and PIC firmware sources are available,
so if you want to experiment...

Wouter

2000\04\24@102831 by Dan Michaels

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Wouter wrote:
>> Ok, I am browsing programmers.. I found/saw this one called WISP.
>> I like it because it seems to have the ability to do production
>programming,
>> it uses a PIC in the circuit.
>> Now the draw back, the web site I saw it on did not seem to offer a
>circuit
>> board for it.
>
>There is a PCB design, it should be on the web page.
>Note that this programmer was designed for 16x84 programming,
>but I used it succesfully with 16f877. It will never work with
>a PIC that requires substantial current from the HVP.
....

I just wanted to re-affirm what Wouter wrote about the
"current from the HVP". We discussed Wouter's design in a
thread about 1 1/2 months ago. Personally, I think his
overall design is quite brilliant, but it generates the
programming voltage using a charge pump powered by the
on-board PIC chip.

I built and tested the charge pump ckt. It is roughly a
Thevinin equivalent with Voc = 13v and Rth = 500 ohms, so
you cannot draw very much current without the output voltage
dropping significantly. Works good for the '84 and '87x chips,
but not for the normal PICs which require up to 50 mA Ipp.

Still, the WISP has some very nice design ideas, worth
incorporating into other designs.

best regards,
- Dan Michaels
Oricom Technologies
http://www.sni.net/~oricom
==========================

2000\04\24@202732 by Ian Wilkinson

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On Mon, 24 Apr 2000, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

So what would people recomend as the best very low cost
programmer for a 16f877.  I have looked around and found so many
different designs and having seen complaints and questions about
some I would like to know from people using them, to program 16f877's

I also use Linux as my main OS, so any that are supported under
Linux would be a plus.

Thanks for your time.

Ian.
--
Sattinger's Law:
It works better if you plug it in.

Uptime at 12:50am  up 3 days,  4:01,  2 users,

2000\04\25@121423 by w. v. ooijen / f. hanneman
picon face
> So what would people recomend as the best very low cost
> programmer for a 16f877.  I have looked around and found so many
> different designs and having seen complaints and questions about
> some I would like to know from people using them, to program 16f877's

Insufficient data - a 'the best' question always needs a full set of
boundary conditions!
DIY, kit, commercial? I guess the best to start with could be an 'almost no
parts - works most of the time' serial port programmer. After swapping the
chip a few times you will want an In Circuit programmer, then something
like WISP could be a good choice, unless you ever want to program other
chips than the '84 and '877.
Wouter

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