Searching \ for 'Pressure Sensitive Key' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=pressure+sensitive
Search entire site for: 'Pressure Sensitive Key'.

Truncated match.
PICList Thread
'Pressure Sensitive Key'
2000\02\21@151726 by brooke

flavicon
face
Hello Lance:

What you are looking for sounds like the type of key that is used on some electronic musical
keyboards.
I am not current this, but you might try out the demo keyboards at a discount store to see
which ones have this feature.
My old Yamaha DX-II had these.

Have Fun,

Brooke

Subject:
       Pressure Sensor
  Date:
       Mon, 21 Feb 2000 09:23:38 +1200
  From:
       Lance Allen <spam_OUTl.allenTakeThisOuTspamAUCKLAND.AC.NZ>



I want to sense an analog response to how hard a button is being
pressed. A small button like any membrane keypad type except
rather than just a close or open an output that is continuous ,
doesn't have to linear or anything.
The PIC A/D will read this and use a lookup table.

I have been examining carbon loaded plastic and capacitance type
sensors but I am unhappy with what I have found so far, an off the
shelf solution would of course be best.

If anyone has any tips, links etc I would be grateful.

2000\02\21@154045 by paulb

flavicon
face
Brooke Clarke wrote:

> What you are looking for sounds like the type of key that is used on
> some electronic musical keyboards.

 Ahh, now this provides a *whole new* slant on the problem.  Musical
keyboards provide not a pressure-sensitive interface, but a velocity-
sensitive one.  Is that what you want after all?  It may be.

 Velocity sensing is dead easy - it just requires two contacts which
operate at different points of the key travel (reliably).  Most
commonly, the two contacts are the end points of a SPDT action and
correspond to the supply rails, so the logic must discriminate between
pulled high, pulled low and tri-state.

 There are ways of doing this with a single PIC I/O.  If you can spare
two I/O per switch, it's even easier.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2000 , 2001 only
- Today
- New search...