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PICList Thread
'Pics and wire-wrapping..'
1997\06\10@205643 by Ravindra Divekar

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Hi folks!
this is my first attempt at making a
wire-wrapped board.

Please tell me:
do we need to use special IC sockets, if so,
what are they called?
how much do wire-wrapping tools cost ?

has anybody used a bread-board for prototyping a PIC ?


Thanks!...ravindra/.

1997\06\10@231645 by Reginald Neale

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>Hi folks!
>this is my first attempt at making a
>wire-wrapped board.
>
>Please tell me:
>do we need to use special IC sockets, if so,
>what are they called?

They are just called "wire-wrap sockets." They have square pins about
0.025" and there are two lengths, depending on how many wraps they accept.
You want the longer ones, about an inch long. They will accept two separate
connections, so you can branch or daisy-chain.

>how much do wire-wrapping tools cost ?

The professional wire-wrap guns probably cost USD50-100, but you can buy a
hand tool for only a few dollars. It's slower and less consistent, but with
a little practice, you can do a perfectly acceptable job. The other end of
the tool is an UN-wrapping tool, which you will also need, unless you never
make mistakes  :-)

Wire-wrap uses special wire. It's solid, silver-plated 28 ga. wire with
kynar insulation. You should get red for Vcc, Black for ground, and at
least a couple of other colors, as the colors make it easier to trace
connections when you're troubleshooting. You should use a special stripping
tool which prevents nicking the wire. It's also possible to buy packets of
wire of various lengths, that have been prestripped on both ends.

>has anybody used a bread-board for prototyping a PIC ?

Sure. At low frequencies it's the simplest approach.
>
Good Luck!

Reg Neale

1997\06\10@232053 by Sean Breheny

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At 04:42 PM 6/10/97 -0700, you wrote:
>Hi folks!
>this is my first attempt at making a
>wire-wrapped board.
>
>Please tell me:
>do we need to use special IC sockets, if so,
>what are they called?
>how much do wire-wrapping tools cost ?
>
>has anybody used a bread-board for prototyping a PIC ?
>
>
>Thanks!...ravindra/.
>
>

There are "wirewrap" IC sockets. These have much longer pins to aid in
wrapping. I am not very familiar with wire wrap tools, but a quick check of
the Mouser catalog showed me that they tend to be expensive! Mouser lists
$43 for the unwrap tool and $41 for the wrap tool! My guess is that you
could find much better than thism though.

I'm not sure what you mean by a bread-board. Do you mean a piece of PC board
with a grid of holes on it without copper? I have never used one of these
but I almost always use the white socket type breadboards for initial PIC
designs. I do not have many problems with them, they work great and are VERY
convenient. Don't know what I would do without them.

Sean

1997\06\11@004029 by William Chops Westfield

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   You want the longer ones, about an inch long. They will accept two
   separate connections, so you can branch or daisy-chain.

"Three level" is the standard size.

   >how much do wire-wrapping tools cost ?

   The professional wire-wrap guns probably cost USD50-100

And up.

   but you can buy a hand tool for only a few dollars.

About $15, these days.  Get one that does a "modified wrap", if you have a
choice.  (This puts a turn or two of insulation around the post as well as
the normal 7 turns or so of bare wire)

   It's slower and less consistent, but with a little practice, you can do a
   perfectly acceptable job. The other end of the tool is an UN-wrapping tool,
   which you will also need, unless you never make mistakes :-)

And there's a wire stripper in the middle.

   Wire-wrap uses special wire. It's solid, silver-plated 28 ga. wire

30ga. for normal connections.  Still pretty easy to find.

   with kynar insulation. You should get red for Vcc, Black for ground, and
   at least a couple of other colors, as the colors make it easier to trace
   connections when you're troubleshooting.

Multiple colors are nice, especially for debugging.  If you have red,
black, and white, I wouldn't waste red and black on VCC/GND (or not only
there!)

   You should use a special stripping tool which prevents nicking the wire.

Like the one in the middle of the manual tool.  "pro" strippers will run
you another $100...


   It's also possible to buy packets of wire of various lengths, that have
   been prestripped on both ends.

Recomended.  Stripping wires is a pain.

Some things suck with wire wrap, such as memory buses.  If you're doing a
memory array, consider some form of wiring that allows you to daisy chain
connections more easilly.  Passive components are also a pain.  Official
policy was to put them on DIP headers and use normal WW IC sockets.
Assuming that you aren't using a CAD system that generates wire lists, make
a zerox of your schematic and highlight over each segment of a wire run as
you make it..

I spent a summer job after highschool doing prototype wirewrapping, using
electric guns and good strippers.  30 wires/hour (including stripping) was
a pretty good rate for a moderately experienced beginner.  Manual is
slower, of course.  Take your time.  I've actually WWrapped a couple
hobby-sized projects, including an ascii keyboard encoder (ala Lancaster)
and a 6bit 75bps to 8 bit 300bps newswire converter (using UARTs.)  It
works pretty well for things about that size (and probably for most
PIC-style projects.)

For experimenting around, those proto-board things have pretty much
completely replaced wirewrapping.  They're wonderful, and I'm really
glad that they came along right about the same time I started to experiment.
WWrapping is nice for circuits where you're going to build no more than
one or two "production" copies of a device.  There are assorted reasons
why WWraping is reliable enough for production circuitry...

BillW

1997\06\11@073300 by Andy Kunz

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At 09:40 PM 6/10/97 PDT, you wrote:
>    You want the longer ones, about an inch long. They will accept two
>    separate connections, so you can branch or daisy-chain.

I use regular sockets and just solder the kynar to them.  The ancient Radio
Shack hand tool I have does a great job of stripping 1/16" of insulation off.

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz - Montana Design - 409 S 6th St - Phillipsburg, NJ 08865
         Hardware & Software for Industry & R/C Hobbies
       "Go fast, turn right, and keep the wet side down!"
==================================================================

1997\06\11@094143 by Byron A Jeff

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{Quote hidden}

Start at Radio Shack. They have a wire wrap tool and wire stripper for $8.

BTW I played with wire wrap guns and Strip-N-wrap tools for several years
until I realized they consistently made flaky connections that were extremely
difficult to debug. Since then I've stuck with the Rat Sack tool and I've
been satisfied ever since.

>
> I'm not sure what you mean by a bread-board. Do you mean a piece of PC board
> with a grid of holes on it without copper?

Commonly known as a perfbord.

> I have never used one of these
> but I almost always use the white socket type breadboards for initial PIC
> designs. I do not have many problems with them, they work great and are VERY
> convenient. Don't know what I would do without them.

I use bread boards for very very small circuits. Anything larger and you run
the danger of accidentally pulling a wire.

BAJ

1997\06\11@150659 by Leon Heller
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In message <spam_OUT9706102342.AA14448TakeThisOuTspamshakti.hal.com>, Ravindra Divekar
<.....ravindraKILLspamspam@spam@HAL.COM> writes
>Hi folks!
>this is my first attempt at making a
>wire-wrapped board.
>
>Please tell me:
>do we need to use special IC sockets, if so,
>what are they called?
>how much do wire-wrapping tools cost ?
>
>has anybody used a bread-board for prototyping a PIC ?

The sockets are just called "wire-wrap sockets", you do need special
ones. A hand tool costs a few $s, I'd start with one of these, rather
than a power tool.

Leon
--
Leon Heller
Amateur radio callsign: G1HSM
Email: leonspamKILLspamlfheller.demon.co.uk http://www.lfheller.demon.co.uk
Tel: +44 (0) 118 947 1424 (home) +44 (0) 1344 385556 (work)

1997\06\12@002634 by Richard Adamec

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On Tue, 10 Jun 1997, Ravindra Divekar wrote:

> Hi folks!
> this is my first attempt at making a
> wire-wrapped board.
>
> Please tell me:
> do we need to use special IC sockets, if so,
> what are they called?
> how much do wire-wrapping tools cost ?
>
> has anybody used a bread-board for prototyping a PIC ?
>
>
> Thanks!...ravindra/.
>
Depends what you're trying to do, wire wrapping is great for a longlasting
prototype (very reliable (timewise) connections ) but a can be a little
slow to put together and is oh so much fun if you put a wire wrong
somewhere,  wirewrapping sockets are available and are usually reasonably
cheap as is a hand wire wrapping tool.

If possible, use breadboards, a lot easier to make quick prototypes, easy
to pull apart if you make a mistake, however not a long lasting (must take
care not to accidently pull out wires during storage)  good idea to pay
that little extra for good boards if you intend to do a lot of work, cheap
boards really don't pay off as the clips inside wear out.

if you have half decent boards, breadboarding works great for a long time,
even for micro. based designs.

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