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'PROGRAMMABLE OSCILLATORS'
1999\10\20@194104 by Brian Kraut

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I have seen some low cost programmable oscillators from Epson in
DigiKey's catalog.  The SG-8002 is programmable from 1-125MHz with 50ppm
stability.  They are under $4.00 each.  I thought that it would be good
to keep a few around for prototyping when I need an oddball fequency and
don't want to order a crystal and wait for it.  Anyone have any
experience with these?  Is there anything special needed to program
them?

What would really be great is something like this that is not OTP for my
proto boards.  Are there any "EPROM" type programmable oscillators out
there?

1999\10\20@210328 by David Covick

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Brian,

I called DigiKey a few months ago and asked about them.  Their tech told me
that "they" have to do the programming.  I believe that you can do the
programming, but the hardware is expensive and probably is not cost
effective.
My interest was for a DDS project.

David


{Original Message removed}

1999\10\20@212239 by Thomas C. Sefranek

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Brian Kraut wrote:

> I have seen some low cost programmable oscillators from Epson in
> DigiKey's catalog.  The SG-8002 is programmable from 1-125MHz with 50ppm
> stability.  They are under $4.00 each.  I thought that it would be good
> to keep a few around for prototyping when I need an oddball fequency and
> don't want to order a crystal and wait for it.  Anyone have any
> experience with these?  Is there anything special needed to program
> them?
>
> What would really be great is something like this that is not OTP for my
> proto boards.  Are there any "EPROM" type programmable oscillators out
> there?

I have not used that exact unit, but I have used Epson programmable
oscillators.
The units I use require jumpers or links to set logic levels on the pins to
program them.


--
Thomas C. Sefranek  WA1RHP
ARRL Instructor, Technical Specialist, VE Contact.
http://www.harvardrepeater.org
http://hamradio.cmcorp.com/inventory/Inventory.html

1999\10\21@002958 by Harold M Hallikainen

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       Fox Electronics has programmable oscillator modules.  Some are
programmed at the factory and others can be loaded serially on the fly.
In addition, of course, there are the Analog Devices DDS synthesizer
chips.

Harold


On Wed, 20 Oct 1999 21:22:09 -0300 "Thomas C. Sefranek" <spam_OUTtcsTakeThisOuTspamCMCORP.COM>
writes:
{Quote hidden}

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1999\10\21@133721 by Harrison Cooper

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Fox used to have a field programmable JITO part, and a programming board I
think.  But they might have discontinued it.  We just order the frequency
desired.  Another choice would be to use a F84 part, with a serial port to
load to the EEPROM memory a setup configuration for a programmable part.  We
use a Cypress part, requires a 22 bit serial word to program from 15Kc up to
130 MHz.  Dual also, so you can program for two different frequencies and
mux between them.

1999\10\21@160310 by Michael Lee

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----- Original Message -----
From: Harold M Hallikainen <.....haroldhallikainenKILLspamspam@spam@JUNO.COM>
To: <PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Thursday, October 21, 1999 5:17 AM
Subject: Re: PROGRAMMABLE OSCILLATORS


>         Fox Electronics has programmable oscillator modules.  Some are
> programmed at the factory and others can be loaded serially on the fly.
> In addition, of course, there are the Analog Devices DDS synthesizer
> chips.

What a hideously expensive solution ! A DDS to clock a 2 bit micro - this is
a joke right?

When I was a lad there was such a thing as a Phase Locked Loop.  This came
from the 4000 series CMOS range and was called 4046.  Add a crystal,
programmable divider, loop filter and you're away.  You might even want to
control it with a PIC.

DDS is a relative new comer on the frequency synthesis scene - its been done
with PLL's for donkey's years.  They (DDS) have exceptional resolution and
tuning times and are widely used in comms and frequency agile systems.

However, as with all things digital (read sampled), Nyquist comes into play.
EG at multiples of the clock frequency, the fundamental output is *zero* (it
follows sinx/x envelope).   Aliasing means that the max o/p freq will be
clk/2.   Granted that for clock generation, you may be able to tolerate high
levels of spurious signals, but this is also a drawback of DDS synthesis.

It makes me shudder every time I hear some-one *casually* suggest the use of
DDS.  Consider these points:

1:    DDS is expensive (relatively)
2:    DDS requires high clocking to avoid aliasing
3:    DDS generates high levels of close in spurious
4:    DDS output follows sinx/x envelope and is *not* flat

I would refer those interested to "Digital Techniques in Frequency
Synthesis" -Goldberg  ISBN 007024166

1999\10\21@202849 by Robert A. LaBudde

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At 07:55 PM 10/20/99 -0700, Brian wrote:
>I have seen some low cost programmable oscillators from Epson in
>DigiKey's catalog.  The SG-8002 is programmable from 1-125MHz with 50ppm
>stability.  They are under $4.00 each.  I thought that it would be good
>to keep a few around for prototyping when I need an oddball fequency and
>don't want to order a crystal and wait for it.  Anyone have any
>experience with these?  Is there anything special needed to program
>them?

By the way, Marlin P. Jones (http://www.mpja.com/) has crystal oscillators
for $1.00 apiece. Why use a resonator?


================================================================
Robert A. LaBudde, PhD, PAS, Dpl. ACAFS  e-mail: .....ralKILLspamspam.....lcfltd.com
Least Cost Formulations, Ltd.                   URL: http://lcfltd.com/
824 Timberlake Drive                            Tel: 757-467-0954
Virginia Beach, VA 23464-3239                   Fax: 757-467-2947

"Vere scire est per causae scire"
================================================================

1999\10\21@203918 by Erik Reikes

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At 09:22 PM 10/20/99 -0300, you wrote:
>Brian Kraut wrote:
>
>> I have seen some low cost programmable oscillators from Epson in
>> DigiKey's catalog.  The SG-8002 is programmable from 1-125MHz with 50ppm
>> stability.  They are under $4.00 each.  I thought that it would be good
>> to keep a few around for prototyping when I need an oddball fequency and
>> don't want to order a crystal and wait for it.  Anyone have any
>> experience with these?  Is there anything special needed to program
>> them?
>>
>> What would really be great is something like this that is not OTP for my
>> proto boards.  Are there any "EPROM" type programmable oscillators out
>> there?

I know exactly the ones you are talking about.  They are 'programmed' at
the factory, and that's the only way, unfortunately.  I had planned to use
them for a project but there was a 12 week lead time on the freq. I needed,
so I changed my design....

-Erik Reikes

1999\10\21@204542 by Brian Kraut

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That kind of takes the fun out of it.  It would be nice if they mentioned that.

David Covick wrote:

> Brian,
>
> I called DigiKey a few months ago and asked about them.  Their tech told me
> that "they" have to do the programming.  I believe that you can do the
> programming, but the hardware is expensive and probably is not cost
> effective.
> My interest was for a DDS project.
>
> David
>
> {Original Message removed}

1999\10\21@210451 by Brian Kraut

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I don't even know how they can call them programable.  Kind of like calling a
standard quartz crystal programmable.

Erik Reikes wrote:

{Quote hidden}

1999\10\21@233947 by William K. Borsum

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Haven't been following this particular thread--so apologies if this has
been mentioned:
FOX makes (used to make?) a really neat programmable oscillator--good up to
100 MHz or so as I recall.  Sold a neat demo kit with two oscillators,
software, and programming/demo board and software for about $50 a few years
ago.  Dunno what ever happened to them, But mine is still in the drawer,
and gets looked at periodically.
I've also used a programmable oscillator/divider--epson I think--which were
in digikeys catalog.  Really worked well.  Programming was via pull ups and
jumpers to ground.

kelly


At 09:20 PM 10/21/99 -0700, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

William K. Borsum, P.E. -- OEM Dataloggers and Instrumentation Systems
<EraseMEborsumspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTdascor.com> & <http://www.dascor.com>San Diego, California, USA

1999\10\22@032626 by Rod Phillips

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----- Original Message -----
From: Brian Kraut <engaltspamspam_OUTEARTHLINK.NET>
To: <@spam@PICLISTKILLspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Wednesday, October 20, 1999 9:55 PM
Subject: PROGRAMMABLE OSCILLATORS


Brian,

Dallas Semiconductor makes their DS1075 programmable oscillator chip good to
100MHZ.  Available directly from their web site.

                                                                       Rod

{Quote hidden}

1999\10\23@034226 by William Chops Westfield

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   By the way, Marlin P. Jones (http://www.mpja.com/) has crystal oscillators
   for $1.00 apiece. Why use a resonator?

Take a look at the current consumption for the typical crystal oscillator.
(hint: 25-50mA) I suspect this would be a significant issue in any
battery-powered device, although it might be irrelevant for something with
anything but the smallest AC supply...

BillW

1999\10\24@002427 by Harold M Hallikainen

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>     By the way, Marlin P. Jones (http://www.mpja.com/) has crystal
> oscillators
>     for $1.00 apiece. Why use a resonator?
>
>

       Cuz they take less board space and we get them for about $0.50 each...

Harold

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1999\10\24@071725 by gdaniel

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Harold M Hallikainen wrote:

> >     By the way, Marlin P. Jones (http://www.mpja.com/) has crystal
> > oscillators
> >     for $1.00 apiece. Why use a resonator?
> >
> >
>
>         Cuz they take less board space and we get them for about $0.50 each...
>
> Harold

...And also because they are more resilient to mechanical shock.
Graham

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