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PICList Thread
'PICLIST Digest - 24 Jul 1997 to 25 Jul 1997'
1997\07\30@045137 by John Fairall

flavicon
face
Dear Sir,

Can you please give the command line to remove me from the list of
subscribers

Many thanks

john Fairall
spam_OUTsalesTakeThisOuTspamrfsolutions.co.uk
<http://www.rfsolutions.co.uk>

----------
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tokens
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some,
> >as switching to this folder is getting slow!
>
> I suspect quite a few of us are getting a lot of messages accumulated.
> What's the final word on availability of an archived version of the mail
on
> the list?  Is there one and I just don't know about it?  Someone
mentioned
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the
> program I was given.
>
> I believe I have found the problem... electron depletion (or
polarization,
> or electrolisys, all essentially the same I think?) on the electrodes.  I
> have been sending a 5 volt signal (RA1) through the probe (two stainless
> steel elecrodes), and then through a cap that is wired to ground. The
probe
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dissolved
> solids as it depends on the species present.
>
> To measure conductivity you ideally want an AC signal with no DC
component,
> otherwise (as you have discovered) you polarise your cell, and eventually
> start electrolysing water.
>
> You might consider clamping one electrode at V(supply)/2 and switching
the
> other alternately low and high with a 50% duty cycle (zero net current).
> This makes measurement a bit tricky but it's the simplest option.
>
> Another option is to connect both electrodes to outputs and switch one
high
> and the other low then vice-versa, but I suspect that 5V will probably be
> too much for your cell and will result in electrolysis.
>
> One other problem has occured to me. If you are looking at high purity
water
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circuit
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circuit
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comes
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dissolved
>        solids) with a pic, your input would be greatly appreciated.
>
>       This is my first PIC project, which was given to me because the guy
who
>       started it couldn't get it working properly.  I've spent the last
few
>       months learning the language, and trying to decode a nest of goto's
in the
>        program I was given.
>
>       I believe I have found the problem... electron depletion (or
polarization,
>       or electrolisys, all essentially the same I think?) on the
electrodes.  I
>
> You will need a little signal conditioning ahead of you're A/D.  If you
put the
> leads of an ohmmeter in a glass of salt water, you will see it stabilize
at some
> reading after a few moments, but if you stir the water, the conductivity
will
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tokens
> >brought in are placed into the execution pipeline of the processor?  Of
> >course SOMEONE knows how; maybe I should re-phrase that: HOW are the
tokens
> >brought in placed into the execution pipeline?
>
> A huge switch statement, with the more common tokens at the beginning?
>
> address = 0;
> while(1)
>  {    token = GetByteAt(address++);
>       switch(token)
>        {    case GOTO:  // assume we are working for int Basic - and goto
is
> of course most common <g>
>                  address = GetWordAt(address);
>              break;
>             case PRINT:
>                 // handle print params - say "Hello World" - probably
mapped
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and
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bits;
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positive..
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goes
> back to 1971 (that's before even the 555!), I've been hitting it a lot
this
> last week, but found I got a much better service (VERY much faster) from
> the official US Patent Office site at http://patents.uspto.gov/index.html
> They only run from 1976, but you can construct long and elaborate search
> strings (like Alta Vista Advanced) which the IBM server doesn't seem to
> handle.  Where the IBM site scores is in having scanned images of the
> patents available.  So, some of the time I opened a second Netscape and
did
> the heavy-duty searching at USPTO and the detailed browsing at womplex.
>
> I have tried looking for UK Patent Office, but one of their quoted URLs
has
> disppeared, and the other simply brings up an ISP's banner and advert.
Can
> this be another reason why, although UK generates lots of patents per
1000
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the
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in the
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in the
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----------------------------------------------------------------------------

> | Richard Thomas                                          Computer
Officer |
> | Department of Design,
|
> | Brunel University,  Runnymede,  Egham,  TW20 0JZ,  UK.
|
> | spamBeGoneRichard.ThomasKILLspamspam@spam@brunel.ac.uk                  phone:  01784  431341
x267 |
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

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causing
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Motors
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the
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bit,
> and my Windows software now addresses all the bits as required for the
F84.
>
> However, I haven't been able to test it yet, due to lack of an F84.
>
> > Does anyone have any ideas on what else the problem could be with
> > my F84? I'm hoping somebody will just tell me I'm an idiot and
> > show me how to fix it in ten minutes. :-)
>
> My only suggestion is to try your F84 in someone elses programmer, to
prove
> wether your chip or programmer is at fault.
>
> > BTW, I have had the same problem with the Windows version of Nigel's
> > programming software. It refuses to program, and is unable to set the
> > fuse settings.
>
> The latest Windows beta version now has an erase button included, I've
not
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TIMER
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interface
> >     to a PS/s mouse with a PIC micro. I am aware that the Microchip
> >     Embedded Control Handbook contains Application notes on the serial,
> >     and ADB interfaces. Are thre any good PIC code examples or
references
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adapt
>  to either with an adapter, some can not.
>
> On Friday, July 25, 1997 2:44 PM, Tim Kerby
[SMTP:RemoveMEtim.kerbyRemoveMEspamEraseMEUKONLINE.CO.UK]
>  wrote:
> > Hi
> > ps/2 is the same as serial, just a different connector.  I have seen
many
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power
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84h
>
> I have tried checking busy on power up before calibrating.
> I have tried on power up setting CS low, killing 100ms, setting CS high
to
> cancel out any noise induced signals to the ADC.
> I have tried on power up before calibrating sending dummy control words
> 00h,00h,80h,00h.
>
> Nothing seems to make the part reliable.  If anyone has used this part
with
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ground
> on its PS/2 connector, normally pulled-up) to detect whether PS/2 or
RS-232
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adapt
> > to either with an adapter, some can not.
> >
> >On Friday, July 25, 1997 2:44 PM, Tim Kerby
[SMTP:spam_OUTtim.kerbySTOPspamspamUKONLINE.CO.UK]
> > wrote:
> >> Hi
> >> ps/2 is the same as serial, just a different connector.  I have seen
many
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