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'PIC x GRAPHIC LCD's'
1999\03\19@195855 by Wagner Lipnharski

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Hi, any experiences with graphics lcd's without controller?
You need to set every single dot on the display...
Any good low cost supplier? Any programming example?
Any library for big digits (10x14 or more)? or icones?
Thanks.  Wagner.

1999\03\20@081721 by Byron A Jeff

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>
> Hi, any experiences with graphics lcd's without controller?
I played with them a bit. Never made any real progress.

> You need to set every single dot on the display...
> Any good low cost supplier? Any programming example?

Actually the controller is split into to two parts. The low level controller
is mounted on the back of the display. It expects a stream of bits along
with syncronization information through its interface. Essentially it's a
really big shift register that you have to latch and increment at specified
times.

The graphics controller is then the higher level interface that interfaces
to the lower interface, maintains the RAM etc.

This is the controller you need to figure out. Haven't seen any code for a PIC
driving a display though. Anybody?

> Any library for big digits (10x14 or more)? or icones?

Kinda moot without the graphics controller or its equivalent. After that it
should be fairly simple to interface standard fonts and icons....

BAJ

1999\03\20@085047 by Fisher, Tom L (FISHER)

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"PIC plots pixels sans controller" EDN, 16 Feb 98, p96 or check their
website at http://www.edmag.com
Tom Fisher


{Quote hidden}

1999\03\20@164731 by paulb

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Tom L Fisher wrote:

> "PIC plots pixels sans controller" EDN, 16 Feb 98, p96 or check their
> website at http://www.edmag.com

 Not only isn't that a URL, it's not even *nearly* a URL.  You meant:
http://www.ednmag.com/default.cfm and yes, the article is there under
 "http://www.ednmag.com/reg/1998/021698/04di.cfm#PIC plots pixels"

 The article makes it very clear this is only suitable for very simple
information such as a bar graph.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1999\03\25@162249 by John Payson

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|  Not only isn't that a URL, it's not even *nearly* a URL.  You meant:
|http://www.ednmag.com/default.cfm and yes, the article is there under
|  "http://www.ednmag.com/reg/1998/021698/04di.cfm#PIC plots pixels"

|  The article makes it very clear this is only suitable for very simple
|information such as a bar graph.

The last one you gave isn't formatted quite right, but close
enough...

<http://www.ednmag.com/reg/1998/021698/04di.cfm#PIC=20plots=20pixels>

Cute design, really.  If you use a PIC with built-in SPI support (as did
the author I think) you could probably save a little time by doing some-
thing like:

               comf            bitmap0,w
               decfsz  dat0
                xorlw  1
               decfsz  dat1
                xorlw  2
               decfsz  dat2
                xorlw  4
               decfsz  dat3
                xorlw  8
               decfsz  dat4
                xorlw  16
               decfsz  dat5
                xorlw  32
               decfsz  dat6
                xorlw  64
               decfsz  dat7
                xorlw  128
               xorwf           bitmap0,f
               movf            bitmap0,f
               movwf           SPI             ; The PIC's SPI port--I forget t
he label

This only requires 2.5 cycles/pixel if unrolled to the width of the
screen.  A little big, but not ridiculous, esp. if half the data is in
bank 0 and half in bank 1 [in that case, point FSR at the SPI port so
the code won't care which bank it's in].

In general, of course, it's probably better to use either a "real" LCD
controller or at least some external circuitry that can "help the PIC
out", but I would expect the SPI controller would free up enough CPU
cycles that the PIC could do quite a few "wonderful and amazing" things.

Anyone here ever program the Atari 2600?

1999\03\26@061638 by paulb

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Hello John.

> The last one you gave isn't formatted quite right, but close
> enough...

> <http://www.ednmag.com/reg/1998/021698/04di.cfm#PIC=20plots=20pixels>

 Ah!  So *that's* how you code those spaces.  Just *one* reason I
dislike Windoze is that just to be thoroughly incompatible (including
with UN*X), they permit spaces in names, giving people the impression
it's a good idea!

> If you use a PIC with built-in SPI support (as did the author I think)
> you could probably save a little time by doing something like:

 Cute indeed.

> In general, of course, it's probably better to use either a "real" LCD
> controller or at least some external circuitry that can "help the PIC
> out",

 Should I get enthused (hopefully most unlikely, *far* too much to do
already), I'd be inclined to go for the controller and decent memory.

> but I would expect the SPI controller would free up enough CPU cycles
> that the PIC could do quite a few "wonderful and amazing" things.

 Pity there's no flash part that has it eh?  Perhaps an AVR.

> Anyone here ever program the Atari 2600?

 Nope.  And I trust I never will prior to the Old Folks Home.  I have
a couple, recently bought as "spares" or whatever you call them.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

1999\03\26@140403 by John Payson

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> The last one you gave isn't formatted quite right, but close
> enough...

> <http://www.ednmag.com/reg/1998/021698/04di.cfm#PIC=20plots=20pixels>

|  Ah!  So *that's* how you code those spaces.  Just *one* reason I
|dislike Windoze is that just to be thoroughly incompatible (including
|with UN*X), they permit spaces in names, giving people the impression
|it's a good idea!

Unix allows spaces in filenames just fine.  My beef with Microsoft
on this issue is that they use spaces in lots of the system-related
file names like "Program Files", "Start Menu", etc. and din't make
the uppercase==lowercase matching routine also do something useful
like space==underline.

BTW, MS-DOS also allows spaces in filenames, but only in some programs.
This can cause have interesting wierd effects...

> In general, of course, it's probably better to use either a "real" LCD
> controller or at least some external circuitry that can "help the PIC
> out",

|  Should I get enthused (hopefully most unlikely, *far* too much to do
|already), I'd be inclined to go for the controller and decent memory.

I sorta like a 122x32 display from Hantronix.  Needs a fair number of
PIC port pins to talk to, but otherwise pretty nice.  Each byte is a
vertical section of 8 pixels (so the display is 8 bytes high by 122
wide) rather than horizontal; makes variable-width fonts much easier.

> but I would expect the SPI controller would free up enough CPU cycles
> that the PIC could do quite a few "wonderful and amazing" things.

|  Pity there's no flash part that has it eh?  Perhaps an AVR.

Maybe the 16F87x will be available sometime.

> Anyone here ever program the Atari 2600?

|  Nope.  And I trust I never will prior to the Old Folks Home.  I have
|a couple, recently bought as "spares" or whatever you call them.

It uses s a 6507 (28-pin 6502 variant) running at colorburst/3, with
76 CPU cycles per scan line (NTSC has 227.5 colorburst cycles per
line, while the Atari outputs 228).  Since the 6507 probably averages
about 3 cycles/instruction, there's time for about 25-26 instructions.

In that time, on every scan line which doesn't match the one above it,
one has to change whatever video registers need changing; if the CPU
doesn't do anything the display will just output the same line repeat-
edly.

The Atari 2600 provides programmers with 128 bytes of RAM, and 4K of
address space for ROM (most newer cartridges have about 8K of banked
ROM; some have even more).  Given the limits of the platform, it's
really quite amazing what has been done with it.

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