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'PIC programming timing [gpprg?]'
1998\08\11@030426 by James Cameron

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Brian C. Lane wrote:
> I'm finally getting around to starting work on expanding picprg (my
> PIC16x84 downloader for Linux) to support the rest of the serially
> programmable PIC micros

Excellent.  I was thinking of adding 12C509 support myself.

> (the finished product will be commercial
> though, $19.95 or so, including source).

Hmm.  That's sad.  My budget isn't anything like that, so I'll probably
just do it myself.  I'm going to be a farmer in a third-world country in
the next six months or so; the freedom of GPL'd source code means a lot
to me.

Perhaps the gpasm/gpsim team needs to make a gpprg?

--
James Cameron                              (spam_OUTjames.cameronTakeThisOuTspamdigital.com)
Digital Equipment Corporation (Australia) Pty. Ltd. A.C.N. 000 446 800

1998\08\11@160053 by Scott Dattalo

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On Tue, 11 Aug 1998, James Cameron wrote:

>
> Perhaps the gpasm/gpsim team needs to make a gpprg?
>

Some time ago, Imre asked Microchip for the communication protocol for the
picstart+. Unfortunately he got no response. This would have been a good
beginning for 'gpprg'. But at 100 some-odd dollars, it's not exactly
suitable for a 3rd world farmer. Perhaps somebody would volunteer to
expand upon the ubiquitous Tait programmer?


Scott

1998\08\12@122358 by John Payson

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[quoting]
>
> Perhaps the gpasm/gpsim team needs to make a gpprg?
>

Some time ago, Imre asked Microchip for the communication protocol for the
picstart+. Unfortunately he got no response. This would have been a good
beginning for 'gpprg'. But at 100 some-odd dollars, it's not exactly
suitable for a 3rd world farmer. Perhaps somebody would volunteer to
expand upon the ubiquitous Tait programmer?

[me]  I've been wanting for quite some time to make a PIC-controlled PIC programmer, using a 16x84 as the MCU.  The 16C84 can be programmed easily using a printer port, a 9 volt battery, a socket, and some wires; the others all tend to be a bit more fussy about programming voltages and timings.

Going with a micro controlling the device would make it much more useable under operating systems such as Linux, since the micro could handle the 100us programming pulses; while the length of the pulses generally isn't critical, my experience is that PIC's (other than the 16x84) will get slagged if the pulse is more than a few ms (on the 12C508, for example, it may become impossible to program every 16th word).  In addition, such a programmer could use the serial port as an RS232 async port, so operating systems like Linux, WinNT, OS/2, etc. (not to mention MacOS, etc.) should like it much better than the bit-bang techniques typically employed.

1998\08\12@131109 by mjb

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John Payson writes:
>
> [me]  I've been wanting for quite some time to make a PIC-controlled PIC =
> programmer, using a 16x84 as the MCU.  The 16C84 can be programmed =
> easily using a printer port, a 9 volt battery, a socket, and some wires; =
> the others all tend to be a bit more fussy about programming voltages =
> and timings.
>
> Going with a micro controlling the device would make it much more =
> useable under operating systems such as Linux, since the micro could =
> handle the 100us programming pulses; while the length of the pulses =
> generally isn't critical, my experience is that PIC's (other than the =
> 16x84) will get slagged if the pulse is more than a few ms (on the =
> 12C508, for example, it may become impossible to program every 16th =
> word).  In addition, such a programmer could use the serial port as an =
> RS232 async port, so operating systems like Linux, WinNT, OS/2, etc. =
> (not to mention MacOS, etc.) should like it much better than the =
> bit-bang techniques typically employed.
>

Hmm... I've done just that.  I built a production programmer (multi-voltage
verify) that will program 16C and 16F parts (I've verified it on 16F84
and 16C71).  It has a serial interface, text based.  The driving software
is Perl based, which should make it extremely portable.  I've done most
of my testing under Linux, and a bit under NT.  It has a dull command
line interface right now.  But it works.

the URL to the plans:
http://www.hazmat.com/~mjb/robots/pic/

a inhx8m file is included for it, but I have not released the original
assembler file- I will if you sign an agreement not to re-distribute the
source.

I have temporarily suspended my further development, I'm moving to a new
town and I need to find a new job and sell my house.  Once I'm settled
I'll polish it up, and start working on Rev 2.

I've gotten a few criticisms about the complexity- it really isn't that
bad, not as simple as the AN589(?) programmer, albeit.  I just wanted
to make a production programmer that worked right the first time, without
much fiddling.

If anyone wants to help with further development, email me and we can discuss
this off-line.

I don't know if anyone else has built one, but the page has been viewed
over 1200 times...

-----------------------------
Matt Bennett                |
.....mjbKILLspamspam@spam@hazmat.com              |
http://www.hazmat.com/~mjb/ |

1998\08\12@175631 by Mike Keitz

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On Wed, 12 Aug 1998 13:10:11 -0400 Matt Bennett <mjbspamKILLspamSCDH-99.UMD.EDU>
writes:

>Hmm... I've done just that.  I built a production programmer
>(multi-voltage
>verify) that will program 16C and 16F parts (I've verified it on 16F84
>and 16C71).  It has a serial interface, text based.  The driving
>software
>is Perl based, which should make it extremely portable.

Definitely a text-based protocol over RS-232 is the way to go.  If the
programmer interprets the hex file directly, then no driving software
other than the "ASCII file upload" feature of a terminal emulator would
be required.  Or a simple script could be written to automate the
process.  Use hardware handshaking to keep the terminal from sending
faster than the PIC can be programmed.


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1998\08\13@182254 by Claudio Rachiele IW0DZG

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                  Status Distribution August 12, 1998 21:52:18

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