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'PIC microcontroller serial communication distance'
2007\03\07@195630 by Orhan Gazi

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Hello All,
 
 I wonder how long could  the maximum serial communication distance be between two pic16f628a, and also how long can the maximum distance be for serial communication between a pic16f628 and a computer rs232 port.
 
 Many thanks
 Orhan


---------------------------------
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2007\03\07@202725 by Bob Axtell

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Orhan Gazi wrote:
> Hello All,
>    
>   I wonder how long could  the maximum serial communication distance be between two pic16f628a, and also how long can the maximum distance be for serial communication between a pic16f628 and a computer rs232 port.
>    
>   Many thanks
>   Orhan
>
>  
> ---------------------------------
> Be a PS3 game guru.
> Get your game face on with the latest PS3 news and previews at Yahoo! Games.
>  
For RS232C, about 100' (30 meters). For RS232C using special
low-capacitance cables, perhaps to 50 meters
at 9600baud.

If you use RS422/RS485, you can easily send 9600baud a mile or more.

--Bob

2007\03\08@014223 by Vasile Surducan

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On 3/7/07, Bob Axtell <spam_OUTengineerTakeThisOuTspamneomailbox.com> wrote:
> Orhan Gazi wrote:
> > Hello All,
> >
> >   I wonder how long could  the maximum serial communication distance be between two pic16f628a, and also how long can the maximum distance be for serial communication between a pic16f628 and a computer rs232 port.
> >
> >   Many thanks
> >   Orhan
> >
> >
> > ---------------------------------
> > Be a PS3 game guru.
> > Get your game face on with the latest PS3 news and previews at Yahoo! Games.
> >
> For RS232C, about 100' (30 meters). For RS232C using special
> low-capacitance cables, perhaps to 50 meters
> at 9600baud.
>
> If you use RS422/RS485, you can easily send 9600baud a mile or more.
>

RS232 2400bps 900m tested
RS232 19kbps CAT5 cable, 100m tested
RS485 1Km without repetor, theoretically any distance with repeaters
at every 800m and twisted cable.

Vasile

2007\03\08@182822 by Dario Greggio

face picon face
Orhan Gazi wrote:


> I wonder how long could  the maximum serial communication distance be
> between two pic16f628a, and also how long can the maximum distance be
> for serial communication between a pic16f628 and a computer rs232
> port.

I guessed you also wanted to know "max distance for pure TTL
communication", in which case I can say that some 5-10mt can be
achieved. It will depend on speed, also.

--
Ciao, Dario

2007\03\08@183353 by M. Adam Davis

face picon face
As others have stated, long distance communications is usually done
via RS-232/422/485.  They are designed exactly for this application.

How far you can go using just the CMOS outputs and inputs with the PIC
depends on the environment you are in.  If it's very noisy (industrial
machinery) then you'd have difficulty going very far without a lot of
error correction.  If it's very quiet you may not even need a checksum
to go pretty far.

If you're running at 5V then put a 2K ohm resistor from the input pin
of the receiver to its 5V supply.  The wire inbetween them can go a
pretty long distance and still have the output show up at the receiver
correctly - you're drawing a bit of current at the receiver, which
should overcome some of the noise that will get put on the line from
the environment.  The longer the wire, the higher value the resistor
needs to be - this is due to the resistance of the wire.  If it's more
than 5% or 10% of the pull up resistor value, then the receiver may
not receive 0's.

Then make sure you transmit at a low speed, and use forward error
correction and checksums if it's noisy.  Consider using an encoding
that includes clock info, such as manchester encoding.  This may help
with inductive issues, but will decrease total speed.

The ideal solution, though, is to use the appropriate transceivers for
the job.  RS-485 is a good long distance solution, and is fairly small
and cheap.

-Adam

On 3/7/07, Orhan Gazi <.....orhangazi2004KILLspamspam@spam@yahoo.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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