Searching \ for 'PIC driving triac' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/microchip/devices.htm?key=pic
Search entire site for: 'PIC driving triac'.

Truncated match.
PICList Thread
'PIC driving triac'
1994\12\08@045559 by crocontroller discussion list

flavicon
face
I was at a PIC seminar in Edinburgh recently and I met one of the
Microchip Applications Engineers who said he was using a PIC to drive a
triac. The interesting bit was that he had one of the PIC input pins
connected to 240v a.c. via a 1M resistor to do the zero crossing
detection. Because PICs have clamp diodes on the inputs, with the
addition of a (very large) current limiting resistor this doesn't result
in the top being blown off the chip, instead giving a fairly good logic
level input that can be read by the port. Of course you have to be
fairly careful where you stick your fingers during prototyping :-)
Thought you lot might find this interesting.
                                               -Alasdair

[ The opinions expressed are my own and are therefore undeniably correct ]
[ beyond a shadow of a doubt.                                            ]

Alasdair MacLean, University of Edinburgh, Dept. of Artificial
Intelligence, 5 Forrest Hill, Edinburgh, EH1 2QL
tel. (+44) 0131 650 4497        fax. 0131-650-6899
email spam_OUTalasdairTakeThisOuTspamaifh.ed.ac.uk
http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk:80/staff/personal_pages/alasdair

1994\12\08@045559 by crocontroller discussion list

flavicon
face
I was at a PIC seminar in Edinburgh recently and I met one of the
Microchip Applications Engineers who said he was using a PIC to drive a
triac. The interesting bit was that he had one of the PIC input pins
connected to 240v a.c. via a 1M resistor to do the zero crossing
detection. Because PICs have clamp diodes on the inputs, with the
addition of a (very large) current limiting resistor this doesn't result
in the top being blown off the chip, instead giving a fairly good logic
level input that can be read by the port. Of course you have to be
fairly careful where you stick your fingers during prototyping :-)
Thought you lot might find this interesting.
                                               -Alasdair

[ The opinions expressed are my own and are therefore undeniably correct ]
[ beyond a shadow of a doubt.                                            ]

Alasdair MacLean, University of Edinburgh, Dept. of Artificial
Intelligence, 5 Forrest Hill, Edinburgh, EH1 2QL
tel. (+44) 0131 650 4497        fax. 0131-650-6899
email .....alasdairKILLspamspam@spam@aifh.ed.ac.uk
http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk:80/staff/personal_pages/alasdair

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 1994 , 1995 only
- Today
- New search...