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'PIC code for Random number generation'
1999\01\31@221004 by Ravi Pailoor

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         David Sprenkle <spam_OUTdjsprenkleTakeThisOuTspamEARTHLINK.NET

Hi David,

Please find below PIC code for RANDOM NUMBER GENERATION by Peter H.
Anderson. I found it it one of the PIC sites. Hope it is useful to you.

Bye

Ravi Pailoor


Generating a Random Number

            copyright, Peter H. Anderson, Dept of Electrical
Enginnering,
            Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD 21239, August 9, '97



Introduction.

This discussion presents a simple algorithm for generating a 16-bit
random number.

Any part of this 16-bit number may be used for random processes. For
example, if only a "coin
flip" is desired, any single bit may be used. If it is desired to
generate a random number in the
range 0, 1, 2 or 3, then any two bits may be used. In this application,
random numbers in the
range of 0 - 255 were desired and thus only eight of the 16 bits are
used.

For applications where a random number in the range of 0-9 is desired,
one might use ten bits (0 -
1023) of the 16-bit random number and simply divide by 102. Another
possibility would be to
simply count the number of ones occuring in nine of the 16-bits.

The Algorithm.

Consider a 16-bit shift register consisting of bytes RAND_HI and
RAND_LO. Consider external
circuitry which exclusive ors bits RAND_HI.7, RAND_HI.6, RAND_HI.4 and
RAND_LO.3
together to produce a feedback bit. A new random number is generated by
shifting this 16-bit
quantity to the left and then inserting the feedback bit in RAND_LO.0.

This is implemented in routine RANDOM in the following program.

Bit RAND_HI.7 is used to generate the feedback bit. If RAND_HI.6 is a
logic one, RAND_HI
is exclusive ored with 80H. However, if RAND_HI.6 is a logic zero,
RAND_HI is exclusive ored
with 00H. Thus RAND_HI.7 is now RAND_HI.7 XOR RAND_HI.6. Note that all
other bits in
RAND_HI are unchanged.

This process is continued for bits RAND_HI.4 and RAND_LO.3.

Thus, the feedback bit is now in bit RAND_HI.7. This is rotated into the
carry without modifying
RAND_HI by executing;

       RLF RAND_HI, W

A two byte shift is then executed;

       RLF RAND_LO, F  ; feedback bit no in RAND_LO.0
                       ; C contains former ms bit of RAND_LO
       RLF RAND_HI, F  ; former ms bit of RAND_LO now in ls bit of
                       ; RAND_HI

Note that there is a problem with this 16-bit "ring counter"
implementation in that if the value is
0000, the next and all subsequent values will also be zero. Thus, this
condition is tested in the
RANDOM routine and if it is at 0000H, the value is modified to 00FF.

In the program, a call is made to RANDOM. The high byte, RAND_HI is
output to eight discrete
LEDs on PORTB. The low byte, RAND_LO is used for a delay of 10 - 2560
msecs.

; Program RANDOM.ASM
;
; Illustrates an implementation of a 16-bit random number generator.
;
; Assumes 8 LEDs on PORTB.  A random pattern is displayed for a random
; amount of time.  Continuous loop.
;
; copyright, Peter H. Anderson, MSU, August 9, '97

       LIST p=16c84
#include &ltc:\mplab\p16c84.inc>
       __CONFIG 11h

       CONSTANT BASE_VAR=0CH

LOOP3   EQU BASE_VAR+0          ; for timing
LOOP2   EQU BASE_VAR+1
LOOP1   EQU BASE_VAR+2

RAND_HI EQU BASE_VAR+3          ; 16-bit random number
RAND_LO EQU BASE_VAR+4

MAIN:
       BSF STATUS, RP0
       CLRF TRISB              ; all bits on PORTB are outputs
       BCF STATUS, RP0
MAIN_1:
       CALL RANDOM             ; generate 16-bit random number
       MOVF RAND_HI, W         ; use high byte as random pattern
       MOVWF PORTB
       MOVF RAND_LO, W         ; use low byte as random delay
       MOVWF LOOP3
       CALL DELAY
       GOTO MAIN_1             ; repeat indefinitely

RANDOM:
       MOVF RAND_HI, W         ; if current random is 0000, make it
00FFH
       IORWF RAND_LO, W
       BTFSC STATUS, Z
       COMF RAND_LO, F

       BTFSS RAND_HI, 6        ; hi.7 = hi.7 xor hi.6
       MOVLW 00H
       BTFSC RAND_HI, 6
       MOVLW 80H
       XORWF RAND_HI, F

       BTFSS RAND_HI, 4        ; hi.7 = hi.7 xor hi.4
       MOVLW 00H
       BTFSC RAND_HI, 4
       MOVLW 80H
       XORWF RAND_HI, F

       BTFSS RAND_LO, 3        ; hi.7 = hi.7 xor lo.3
       MOVLW 00H
       BTFSC RAND_LO, 3
       MOVLW 80H
       XORWF RAND_HI, F

       RLF RAND_HI, W          ; carry = hi.7
       RLF RAND_LO, F          ; double left shift
       RLF RAND_HI, F

       RETURN

DELAY:          ; delays loop3 * 10 msecs

       MOVLW .10               ; 10 msecs
       MOVWF LOOP2
DELAY_1:
       MOVLW .110
       MOVWF LOOP1
DELAY_2:
       NOP
       NOP
       NOP
       NOP
       NOP
       NOP
       DECFSZ LOOP1, F
       GOTO DELAY_2
       DECFSZ LOOP2, F
       GOTO DELAY_1
       DECFSZ LOOP3, F
       GOTO DELAY
       RETURN

       END


David Sprenkle wrote:

{Quote hidden}

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1999\01\31@222004 by dave vanhorn

flavicon
face
>Generating a Random Number
>
>             copyright, Peter H. Anderson, Dept of Electrical
>Enginnering,
>             Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD 21239, August 9, '97
>


This is a broken implementation of a PN generator. The need for a trap for
the all zeroes condition tells you that it's broken. In a good
implementation, unless you start it at all zero, it will never get there on
it's own.
The hack to keep it from locking, also shortens the sequence. :(


'PIC code for Random number generation'
1999\02\01@185032 by Mike Keitz
picon face
On Sun, 31 Jan 1999 22:08:31 -0500 dave vanhorn <dvanhornspamKILLspamCEDAR.NET>
writes:
>>Generating a Random Number
>>
>>             copyright, Peter H. Anderson, Dept of Electrical
>>Enginnering,
>>             Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD 21239, August 9,
>'97
>>
>
>
>This is a broken implementation of a PN generator. The need for a trap
>for
>the all zeroes condition tells you that it's broken. In a good
>implementation, unless you start it at all zero, it will never get
>there on
>it's own.


>The hack to keep it from locking, also shortens the sequence. :(

It shouldn't unless the sequence generator (bits that are xor'd) is
wrong.  Normal operation will not allow the register to shift to all zero
unless it starts at all zero.  Generators that give maximum length are
given in reference texts (I think Lin and Costello's _Error Control
Coding_ has a page of them).   I don't know offhand if the one given is
correct.

The possibility of locking up at all zero is a normal property of any
linear feedback shift register regardless of the implementation.

The author's xoring process can be optimized *a lot*.  This code or some
variation would work:

;Use RAND_HI.7 to accumulate new bit (RAND_HI.7 xor RAND_HI.6 xor
;  RAND_HI.4 xor RAND_LO.3
       movlw   h'80'
       btfsc   RAND_HI,6
       xorwf   RAND_HI,f
       btfsc   RAND_HI,4
       xorwf   RAND_HI,f
       btfsc   RAND_LO,f
       xorwf   RAND_HI,f

       rlf     RAND_HI,w       ;Get new bit into C
       rlf     RAND_LO,f
       rlf     RAND,HI,f

It helps to choose a register length so the generation of the sequence
only requires xoring two bits.  That leads to shorter xoring code, but
may require more RAM to hold the register.  One classic example is a
17-stage register with stages 14 and 17 xor'd to produce the new bits.

An important point not mentioned in the description is that each call to
"random" only gennerates one new psuedo-random bit.  If you use more than
one bit of the registers as the result, the resulting numbers will be
correlated to each other.  For example, if you use the low 3 bits and a
value of 011 occurs, the next value can only be 110 or 111.  To prevent
this, call "random" n times, then isolate n bits fromt he register to use
as your random number.


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1999\02\01@215917 by dave vanhorn

flavicon
face
>
>>The hack to keep it from locking, also shortens the sequence. :(
>
>It shouldn't unless the sequence generator (bits that are xor'd) is
>wrong.  Normal operation will not allow the register to shift to all zero
>unless it starts at all zero.

'swhat I said.

>An important point not mentioned in the description is that each call to
>"random" only gennerates one new psuedo-random bit.  If you use more than
>one bit of the registers as the result, the resulting numbers will be
>correlated to each other.  For example, if you use the low 3 bits and a
>value of 011 occurs, the next value can only be 110 or 111.  To prevent
>this, call "random" n times, then isolate n bits fromt he register to use
>as your random number.

I implemented it as running as the least important task, merrily spinning
away with an unpredictable number of shifts between uses. For my purpose it
was "random" enough. One could take bits from various places and invert
some of them, and make them out of order, as long as the number of bits you
take is significantly less than the length of the register it should be
pretty hard to predict, if that's your goal.

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