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'PIC and other MCU.'
1998\09\29@191404 by Steven Kosmerchock

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PICListers,
I have been programming M-CHIP PICs for over a year and love them. Recently a fr
iend of mine suggested that I learn how to use a CPU like the 68000 or even the
6800, 8086, or even the 8051 so I can learn how to use external RAM, FLASH,...et
c.. Question: Where would I find a programmer and software ( I program in assemb
ly) for these? Also, do you think it would be wise to learn these other chips or
should I stick with the good ole' PIC?

                       Thanks in advance!
                       Steven

Steven Kosmerchock
Email: spam_OUTsteve.kosmerchockTakeThisOuTspamcelwave.com

1998\09\29@225705 by Paul Penrose

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Steven,
It's always a good idea to get a broad an experience base as possible. I
would look at the smaller systems first, ie. 8051, 6502, and 6811. These
and their varients are used very commonly for imbedded work.

1998\09\29@233342 by jmnewp

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I have not had much experience with them, but the pic17cxx series can be
set up in
microprocessor mode and can utilize external memory, if that is what you
are looking for.
they also are better number crunchers with an 8-bit multiplier and more
speed...33MHz I
believe.  correct me if I'm wrong on any of this....


jon

Steven Kosmerchock wrote:
>
> PICListers,
> I have been programming M-CHIP PICs for over a year and love them. Recently a
friend of mine suggested that I learn how to use a CPU like the 68000 or even th
e 6800, 8086, or even the 8051 so I can learn how to use external RAM, FLASH,...
etc.. Question: Where would I find a programmer and software ( I program in asse
mbly) for these? Also, do you think it would be wise to learn these other chips
or should I stick with the good ole' PIC?
>
>                         Thanks in advance!
>                         Steven
>
> Steven Kosmerchock
> Email: .....steve.kosmerchockKILLspamspam@spam@celwave.com

1998\09\30@005554 by Ken Kaarvik

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>PICListers,
>I have been programming M-CHIP PICs for over a year and love them. Recently
a friend of mine suggested that I learn how to use a CPU like the 68000 or
even the 6800, 8086, or even the 8051 so I can learn how to use external
RAM, FLASH,...etc.. Question: Where would I find a programmer and software
I program in assembly) for these? Also, do you think it would be wise to
learn these other chips or should I stick with the good ole' PIC?
>
>                        Thanks in advance!
>                        Steven


I've been using PIC's for a year too. I also have been playing with
programming the Gameboy for half a year. It is very similar to the Z80.
There are many web sites that describe how to build your own FLASH
cartridges (so you can use your own software to run the GB). The suggested
method to build your own cart is to take an existing cart containing RAM (as
well as ROM) and replace the ROM with a 29F040 FLASH eeprom (512 kbyte). To
program your modified cart you need to build a programmer - I built the one
from NUT'S & VOLTS (Apr/98) but there are similar designs on the web.


IMO the GB is a perfect match for the PIC. The software required for
programming both are free. You can write your programs in C or assembly -
you can even program your GB in BASIC in a way that reminds me of a STAMP.
The GB has a serial port that is just begging to interface to a PIC. A
colour version of the GB is comming out in November.

The GB has a screen of 160x144 pixels in four shades of grey and eight
buttons for input as well as a speaker for sound.

Heck, the GB is cheap, buy several and network them together.

I'm having great fun with the GB (and the PIC) and I think others would too.
I know others on this list have discovered the GB.

Ken Kaarvik
kkaarvikspamKILLspamaxion.net

1998\09\30@064334 by Caisson

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> Van: Steven Kosmerchock <.....Steve.KosmerchockKILLspamspam.....CELWAVE.COM>
> Aan: EraseMEPICLISTspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Onderwerp: PIC and other MCU.
> Datum: woensdag 30 september 1998 1:03
>
> PICListers,
> I have been programming M-CHIP PICs for over a year and love them.
> Recently a friend of mine suggested that I learn how to use a CPU
> like the 68000 or even the 6800, 8086, or even the 8051 so I can learn
> how to use external RAM, FLASH,...etc.. Question: Where would I find
> a programmer and software ( I program in assembly) for these? Also,
> do you think it would be wise to learn these other chips or should I
> stick with the good ole' PIC?

If you want to broaden your field, try programming the PC (80x86).  No
special devices are needed.  DOS 5 even gives you a free single-line
assembler & single-stepper (DEBUG).  Learning to master the PC isn't as
difficult as it seems (DOS anyway ...).  By the way : try programming in
standard 8086-mode. This way your programs will be portable to _any_ PC.

Greetz,
 Rudy Wieser

1998\09\30@101411 by myke predko

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>>Steven Kosmerchock Asked:
>> I have been programming M-CHIP PICs for over a year and love them.
>> Recently a friend of mine suggested that I learn how to use a CPU
>> like the 68000 or even the 6800, 8086, or even the 8051 so I can learn
>> how to use external RAM, FLASH,...etc.. Question: Where would I find
>> a programmer and software ( I program in assembly) for these? Also,
>> do you think it would be wise to learn these other chips or should I
>> stick with the good ole' PIC?

Hi Steve,

May I immodestly suggest my second book, the "Handbook of Microcontrollers"?
It is now available.  In it, I provide information on the:

Microchip PICMicro
Intel 8051
Motorola 68HC05
Atmel AVR
Parallax BASIC Stamp

Along with it, there is a CD-ROM with development tools
(assembler/simulator) for all the devices and a couple of applications for
each (one of the 8051 applications shows how Memory Mapped I/O can be
implemented).

You can get more information at:

http://www.myke.com/My_Books/homcu.htm

Rudy Wieser wrote:
>If you want to broaden your field, try programming the PC (80x86).  No
>special devices are needed.  DOS 5 even gives you a free single-line
>assembler & single-stepper (DEBUG).  Learning to master the PC isn't as
>difficult as it seems (DOS anyway ...).  By the way : try programming in
>standard 8086-mode. This way your programs will be portable to _any_ PC.

Actually, Debug.com seems to be available with everything except Windows/NT
and it's not a bad way to get into 8086 Assembly Language Programming.

Just on this, does anybody know of any good relatively recent (say 1990 or
later) books on PC assembly language programming?  The ones that I have are
all circa 1985 and no longer available (ie out of print).  It's a question I
got asked often and I haven't got a good answer for it.

Thanx,

myke

If you're curious to know what Houdini looked like as a leading man; check
out "Houdini: A Pictorial Biography".

http://www.myke.com/Book_Room/book1a.htm

1998\09\30@140834 by Reginald Neale

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Myke asked:

>Just on this, does anybody know of any good relatively recent (say 1990 or
>later) books on PC assembly language programming?  The ones that I have are
>all circa 1985 and no longer available (ie out of print).  It's a question I
>got asked often and I haven't got a good answer for it.
>

Using Assembly Language, 3rd Edition, Allen L. Wyatt Sr., 1992 QUE Books
ISBN 0-88022-884-9

Can't give you an opinion on this based on personal experience. It's just
on my bookshelf as a result of a book sale.

Reg Neale

1998\09\30@151403 by Matt D K

picon face
There's some really good tuts on the web, just use your search engine. If
you would like I can give you some links. The tutorials are a great
source for beginners.

Matt K
On Wed, 30 Sep 1998 18:06:28 GMT Reginald Neale <nealespamspam_OUTSERVTECH.COM>
writes:
{Quote hidden}

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1998\09\30@152200 by Dean Dowsett

picon face
The one I used was 'Peter Norton's Assembly Language Book for the IBM PC".
It is an old one crica 1989 but maybe there is a more recent version out
there, it is an excellent book.  It was published by Brady Books


On Wed, 30 Sep 1998, Reginald Neale
wrote:

{Quote hidden}

1998\09\30@154804 by goflo

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"Assembler Inside & Out", by Harley Hahn - Excellent for those with
little or no programming experience. Experienced programmers will get
off to a fast start with this text.

"Teach Yourself Assembler", by Mark Goodwin - Assumes some prior
knowledge
of high-level language programming.

Regards, Jack

> Myke asked:
> >Just on this, does anybody know of any good relatively recent (say 1990 or
> >later) books on PC assembly language programming?  The ones that I have are
> >all circa 1985 and no longer available (ie out of print).  It's a question I
> >got asked often and I haven't got a good answer for it.

1998\09\30@161412 by Eisermann, Phillip

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> Myke asked:
> >Just on this, does anybody know of any good relatively recent (say
> 1990 or
> >later) books on PC assembly language programming?  The ones that I
> have are
> >all circa 1985 and no longer available (ie out of print).  It's a
> question I
> >got asked often and I haven't got a good answer for it.
> >
>
       Reg responded:
> Using Assembly Language, 3rd Edition, Allen L. Wyatt Sr., 1992 QUE
> Books
> ISBN 0-88022-884-9
>
> Can't give you an opinion on this based on personal experience. It's
> just
> on my bookshelf as a result of a book sale.
>
>
       I'd like to add "Assembly Language for the IBM-PC" by Kip Irvine
(Macmillan).
       I still have the first edition, but just got the latest one
(third edition, i think).
       And it still comes with the MS assembler (or at least the local
college bookstore
       version did, which is where i buy most books, since waldenbooks
just doesn't
       cut it for technical books, and i can't browse through a book at
amazon.com)

       I got the first edition as a textbook, back in 1990 before the
Pentiums were out.
       The new version does address Pentiums, but i haven't read all of
it yet, so i do
       not know how it addresses the differences in the instruction
sets between
       the older Intel processors and the new ones.

       If you want to learn PC-assembly, it's a good text that goes
from intro level
       to somewhat advanced (enough to keep you busy for a while, at
any rate).

       -Phil


1998\09\30@170132 by Sean Breheny

face picon face
That's the one I learned on as well!

IIRC, it is pretty good. It is outdated now, but the concepts are still there.

Sean

At 02:09 PM 9/30/98 -0500, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

are
>> >all circa 1985 and no longer available (ie out of print).  It's a
question I
{Quote hidden}

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'PIC and other MCU.'
1998\10\01@112729 by Gary Chung
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Matt D K wrote:

> There's some really good tuts on the web, just use your search engine. If
> you would like I can give you some links. The tutorials are a great
> source for beginners.

Please let us know where the links are .

TIA
Gary


{Quote hidden}

1998\10\01@211445 by eric

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Hello,

If you  have interest to learn the 8086, or 80x86 series cpu, there is a
nice book where we selected as a college textbook:

Microproceesors and interfacing, programming and hardware
by Douglas V. hall
Mcgraw-Hill, ISBN 0-07-100462-9

There are many 8086 asm examples and simple applications in the book.
Also, I remember there is a debugger program called ATdebug which works a
lot better than Debug (I forget where we got it from?).  May be somebody in
the list knows this.

Hopefully you might find a copy  in a library.  Good Luck!!

Eric


Caisson wrote:

{Quote hidden}

1998\10\02@080353 by WF AUTOMACAO

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eric wrote:
>
> Hello,
>
> If you  have interest to learn the 8086, or 80x86 series cpu, there is a
> nice book where we selected as a college textbook:
>
> Microproceesors and interfacing, programming and hardware
> by Douglas V. hall
> Mcgraw-Hill, ISBN 0-07-100462-9
>
> There are many 8086 asm examples and simple applications in the book.
> Also, I remember there is a debugger program called ATdebug which works a
> lot better than Debug (I forget where we got it from?).  May be somebody in
> the list knows this.
>
> Hopefully you might find a copy  in a library.  Good Luck!!
>
> Eric
>

11 years ago a read a good book, "THE BLUE BOOK - 8086". All instructions are ex
plained with Figures!
I don't have the ISBN!

Mig.

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