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'PIC -> ega/cga/hercules/printer'
1998\09\29@064923 by Nathan Hendler

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Hello,

Once again, I come to this list hoping someone can point me in the right
direction.  I'd like to have a display on my next project, and I'd like it
to be a small cga/hercules display.  Like the kind found in the Timeline
ads (5" color CGA or something).  Trouble is, I can't find any specs on
CGA.  I know its 60Hz, and that's all.  Has anyone written any code to
interface a PIC with a TTL monitor?

I'm also wondering if anyone has had a project where a PIC talks to a
parallel printer.

Thanks,
Nathan Hendler

1998\09\29@074216 by Morgan Olsson

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Hmmm...
Nowadays you can get PC card with Herkules + LPT ports for almost nothing.
If it is easier to interface the ISA bus ot the devices directly depends on
what you are doing.

At 03:37 1998-09-29 -0700, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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1998\09\29@112114 by Eric Schlaepfer

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Hi Nathan,

A while back I made a PIC to TTL video project. You can find it on my site,
"http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Horizon/8008/". It's designed for
the MDA/Hercules video standard, but it could be adapted to CGA or EGA. If
you modify the timings, make sure that they are as close as possible to the
spec; fixed-frequency moniters are *very* picky about timing problems. I
blew a moniter's horizontal output transistor this way.

Later,

Eric

{Original Message removed}

1998\09\29@142115 by Michael Hagberg

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i recall http://www.circellar.com/ doing an article about cga adapters. the
idea was to use the cga video chip to do all the timing and allow the
processor to write to the chip ram.

michael

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{Original Message removed}

1998\09\29@235027 by William Chops Westfield

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A "cga" video card drives a standard (NTSC-style) color monitor, I believe.
The "40 column" mode of cga video was designed for using the PC with an
RF modulator and a standard TV.

I don't recall for sure whether the connector actually had standard video
signals, or whether it was a combination of RGBI signals and such, but the
relevant scan rates were "standard video."

BillW, keeper of ancient knowlege.

1998\09\30@015553 by Sean Breheny

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Often CGA cards had both the 9-pin CGA connector AND a composite video RCA
jack, which can be directly connected to the composite video in on an NTSC
TV or VCR.

Sean

At 08:48 PM 9/29/98 PDT, you wrote:
>A "cga" video card drives a standard (NTSC-style) color monitor, I believe.
>The "40 column" mode of cga video was designed for using the PC with an
>RF modulator and a standard TV.
>
>I don't recall for sure whether the connector actually had standard video
>signals, or whether it was a combination of RGBI signals and such, but the
>relevant scan rates were "standard video."
>
>BillW, keeper of ancient knowlege.
>
+--------------------------------+
| Sean Breheny                   |
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1998\09\30@020800 by mcoop

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Yes, from memory, the CGA cards I saw had an RCA 'composite' video output
(CVB) which resembled the standard RS170 video waveform close enough for
most TV's to accept.


{Original Message removed}

1998\09\30@021936 by Lee Jones

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> A "cga" video card drives a standard (NTSC-style) color monitor,
> I believe.  The "40 column" mode of cga video was designed for
> using the PC with an RF modulator and a standard TV.

> I don't recall for sure whether the connector actually had standard
> video signals, or whether it was a combination of RGBI signals and
> such, but the relevant scan rates were "standard video."


IBM Color/Graphics Monitor Adapter,
Option Instructions (p/n 1504780, dated April 1983)

The "Option Retaining Bracket" (rear edge) had 2 connectors.
One was a 9-pin connector with "Direct-Drive Signal".  It had
pins for red, green, blue, intensity, horizontal drive, vertical
drive, and several grounds.

The other was a "Phone Jack - Composite Signal".  The center pin
had "1.5-volt Video Signal".  Outer ring was "Chassis Ground".
(reference pages 10 & 16).

Internally, it had two single row headers.  P-1 is 4 pins for
an R.F. Modulator (+12 volts, no connection, composite video
output, & logic ground).  P-2 is 6 pins for connection of a
light pen (i.e. screen pointing).  (reference page 17).

Ahhh, now I have justification for at least a little bit of
the piles & piles of stuff I have lying around.


> BillW, keeper of ancient knowlege.

Lee Jones, keeper of ancient knowledge _and_ hardware :-)

1998\09\30@025508 by Nathan Hendler

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From: Morgan Olsson <.....mrtKILLspamspam.....INAME.COM>
>
> Hmmm...
> Nowadays you can get PC card with Herkules + LPT ports for almost
> nothing. If it is easier to interface the ISA bus ot the devices
> directly depends on what you are doing.


Not exactly what I was hoping for, but I'd consider it.  Anyone know where
I could find out about doing this kind of thing?

Thanks,
Nathan Hendler

1998\09\30@132602 by Michael Hagberg

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you mentioned the color monitors from timeline. did you already buy one? if
so could you tell me the depth? i want to know if they would fit into a
standard (or in my house not so standard) wall cavity.

michael

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'PIC -> ega/cga/hercules/printer'
1998\10\01@001459 by Russell McMahon
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You can also buy the IC to do this (preferably in 10000 quantity :-))
or could consider removing one from an existing board if 1 is all you
want and you don't want to drive the whole board.
.
{Original Message removed}

1998\10\04@183923 by paulb

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Sean Breheny wrote:

> Often CGA cards had both the 9-pin CGA connector AND a composite video
> RCA jack, which can be directly connected to the composite video in on
> an NTSC TV or VCR.

 Trick:  One chip IIRC, had a set of outputs which according to PCB
assembly, either went to the DE-9S directly (or via snubber resistors)
or to a resistor matrix to feed the RCA jack.  A link option apparently
determined whether the colour outputs were RGBI or R-Y,B-Y,I modulated
with the subcarrier.  I think another link option also selected
operation as either CGA or Hercules/MDA.

 Frequencies and standards?  The "Winn Rosch Hardware Bible" might be
in a library somewhere.  CGA was in fact NTSC scan frequencies.  They
*still* sell oodles of video games with TV output, for obvious reasons,
so it is little surprise the PC was so designed at the start.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

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