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'OT - Leonids tonight (and not a PIC in sight :-))'
1998\11\16@214155 by Russell McMahon

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About now the annual Leonid meteor shower arrives - once every 33
years we have closest approach to what used to be a comet and the
results can be extremely spectacular - possibly 10,000 meteors per
hour. Each year we pass through its orbit but only once every 33 do
we get closest approach top the main body.

Put down your PICS, soldering irons etc and step outside.
Tell your friends. Show your children (if you have any) - a one in a
12,000 * event like this one is liable to be worth waking them up
for.

Look in Leo - no doubt there will be lots of advice on the web on
where this will be in "your" night-time (here its in the North-East
after 3 am(groan)).

No doubt someone will suggest a PIC based Y2K compliant clock to time
the days until the next equivalent event.

regards



   Russell McMahon


* - 365.25 * 33 years  = 12,053 days.

1998\11\16@232900 by Sean Breheny

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Hi Russell,

I heard that the Leonids would only be visible in Asia this year, but next
year in parts of Europe. I heard this on a public radio news segment, so I
don't know how much creedance to give it. I'd love to go outside to see if
they were right but its cloudy here. Anybody got a PIC project for sweeping
clouds away?! A rocket, perhaps.<G>

Sean

At 01:26 PM 11/17/98 +1300, you wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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| Sean Breheny                  |
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1998\11\16@233325 by goflo

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Russell McMahon wrote:
>
> About now the annual Leonid meteor shower arrives - once every 33
> years we have closest approach to what used to be a comet and the
> results can be extremely spectacular - possibly 10,000 meteors per
> hour. Each year we pass through its orbit but only once every 33 do
> we get closest approach top the main body.

At the moment (2020L) we're socked in. Aarghh. Not sure when the shower
arrives local time - News enveloped in Bill/Sadam pecker comparisons...

Jack

1998\11\16@233330 by goflo

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Russell McMahon wrote:
>
> About now the annual Leonid meteor shower arrives - once every 33
> years we have closest approach to what used to be a comet and the
> results can be extremely spectacular - possibly 10,000 meteors per
> hour. Each year we pass through its orbit but only once every 33 do
> we get closest approach top the main body.

At the moment (2020L) we're socked in. Aarghh. Not sure when the shower
arrives local time - News engrossed in Bill/Sadam pecker comparisons...

Jack

1998\11\17@091010 by Andy Kunz

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At 11:26 PM 11/16/98 -0500, you wrote:
>Hi Russell,
>
>I heard that the Leonids would only be visible in Asia this year, but next
>year in parts of Europe. I heard this on a public radio news segment, so I
>don't know how much creedance to give it. I'd love to go outside to see if
>they were right but its cloudy here. Anybody got a PIC project for sweeping
>clouds away?! A rocket, perhaps.<G>

No, Sean, it would be BEST in Asia.

Unfortunately, much of the NE USA is under rain and cloud cover :-(

This morning was the peak.  It actually lasts about 3 days of increased
activity, from what I'm told.

Andy


==================================================================
Andy Kunz - Statistical Research, Inc. - Westfield, New Jersey USA
==================================================================

1998\11\17@112742 by Tom Handley

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  Well, we in Oregon can only stare at the rain... I'm on DirectTV and we
are hoping the Hughes satellites surive ;-) Actually, the chances of a hit
are probably less than being struct by lightning but this is a good `wakeup'
for the industry. Most of the military space-based `assets' are better
prepared to deal with this. However, this is contradictory to the move to
smaller/cheaper/commercial platforms for military satellites. Companies with
common spacecraft cores like Hughes, can improve their resistance to the
high static electric potential as well as impact damage. This may require
a small outage as they maneuver the spacecraft so that the solar arrays
are aligned to present minimal exposure to the particles.

  Moscow has ordered the MIR crew to `ride this out' in the Soyuz. Their
main task will be taking photos of the event. Now that the MIR is about to
end it's life, this is another great contribution to science. As an American,
I feel a need to comment on the MIR. We have been *very frustrated* over
Russia's inability to fund their part of the International Space Station.
But this is related to their current economic crisis and their bureaucracy.
The many professionals in their space program and their cosmonauts, are
amongst the best in the field. I think a lot of us forget all that the MIR
space station, and it's crews, have contributed to the next space station
and to science. The MIR was born during the `cold war' and became an
`outpost' for western astronauts to work in peace with cosmonauts in an
effort to benefit all of us on the good Earth.

  - Tom

At 08:15 AM 11/17/98 -0500, Andy Kunz wrote:
{Quote hidden}

1998\11\20@071857 by keithh

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Not a Leonid in sight either, here in Cambridge, UK.

I look out my window at night,
hoping to see lots of heavenly bodies in a shower.

No such luck.

I have to get some mags from the newsagent to see what they look like,
or download pics from the Internet.

My life's like a censored movie - a long wait for the  meteor' bits
only to find you don't get to see them.

A familiar story for many of us I guess.  :-)

1998\11\22@150909 by paulb

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Keith Howell wrote:

> Not a Leonid in sight either, here in Cambridge, UK.

 Well, my vote is - nothing!  I looked out at the prescribed time, not
a sausage!  That day it rained and into the next night so no chance for
a second bite.

 Another astronomical flop (and I've *not* seen a *few* now)!
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

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