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PICList Thread
'OT - Blister packing'
1997\09\26@030041 by Josef Hanzal

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Hi all,

when I found out that it is possible to do SMD soldering in toaster owen, I
would wonder if anyone has tried making blister packs - those clear plastic
bubles with piece of cardboard at the back. Any advice ?

Regards,

Josef

1997\09\26@083541 by mikesmith_ozNOSP*M

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On 26 Sep 97 at 9:06, Josef Hanzal wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> when I found out that it is possible to do SMD soldering in toaster
> owen, I would wonder if anyone has tried making blister packs -
> those clear plastic bubles with piece of cardboard at the back. Any
> advice ?

I'd think a fan forced oven would be better - I've seen 'shrink wrap'
done with little more than a hot air gun.

Of course, if you are blistering sensitive electronics, a microwave
works wonders! <bg>
MikeS
<mikesmith_ozNOSP*M.relaymail.net>
(remove the you know what before replying)

1997\09\26@094024 by Martin R. Green

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Years ago I had an exposure to something like this.  We were shrink
wrapping flats of brake drums for shipment, using large heat shrinkable
bags that were placed over the flat and tucked under at the corners.  The
whole flat was then wheeled into a big oven for a preset time, and when the
flat was removed, the drums were held tightly onto the flat.

The key there was a consistent oven temp and a consistent duration.  I see
no reason that a toaster oven, or a regular oven, couldn't be used for
blister packs.  The key thing to watch out for is that the plastic must not
contact the inside of the oven during shrinkage, so you would need some
kind of stand in the oven to prop the package up off the bottom.

I don't have a clue where to get the shrink wrap material itself, but I'm
sure there are ready made blister "bags" out there that will fit your
package sizes.  Just get one a little bigger than your card stock, with
enough room for the item to be wrapped as well.

Note that these suggestions apply only to simple shrink-wrapped packages.
I don't know how you would do those blister packs where the plastic is
glued to the card prior to shrinkage.  These types of packs don't have any
wraparound at the edges to anchor the item to the card.

This probably doesn't help much, but you never know.

Martin R. Green
spam_OUTelimarTakeThisOuTspambigfoot.com

----------
From:   Josef Hanzal[SMTP:.....euroclassKILLspamspam@spam@PHA.PVTNET.CZ]
Sent:   Friday, September 26, 1997 3:06 AM
To:     PICLISTspamKILLspammitvma.mit.edu
Subject:        OT - Blister packing

Hi all,

when I found out that it is possible to do SMD soldering in toaster owen, I
would wonder if anyone has tried making blister packs - those clear plastic
bubles with piece of cardboard at the back. Any advice ?

Regards,

Josef

1997\09\26@101500 by mikesmith_ozNOSP*M

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On 26 Sep 97 at 9:32, Martin R. Green wrote:


> I don't have a clue where to get the shrink wrap material itself,
> but I'm sure there are ready made blister "bags" out there that will
> fit your package sizes.  Just get one a little bigger than your card

Your local bulk stationer.  They sell it by the roll, like cling-wrap
(I nearly said Glad-Wrap, but realised that only Aussies would
probably recognise - or is it World-Wide?)
MikeS
<mikesmith_ozNOSP*M.relaymail.net>
(remove the you know what before replying)

1997\09\26@103415 by Martin R. Green

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Actually, I think Glad Wrap is an American product that went international.
We certainly have it here it Canada (Do you guys have that foolish albino
Man from Glad too?).

CIAO - Martin R. Green
.....elimarKILLspamspam.....bigfoot.com

----------
From:   Mike Smith[SMTP:mikesmith_ozNOSP*EraseMEMspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTrelaymail.net]
Sent:   Monday, May 26, 1997 10:00 AM
To:     PICLISTspamspam_OUTmitvma.mit.edu
Subject:        Re: OT - Blister packing

On 26 Sep 97 at 9:32, Martin R. Green wrote:


> I don't have a clue where to get the shrink wrap material itself,
> but I'm sure there are ready made blister "bags" out there that will
> fit your package sizes.  Just get one a little bigger than your card

Your local bulk stationer.  They sell it by the roll, like cling-wrap
(I nearly said Glad-Wrap, but realised that only Aussies would
probably recognise - or is it World-Wide?)
MikeS
<mikesmith_ozNOSP*M.relaymail.net>
(remove the you know what before replying)

1997\09\26@104042 by ew Farag (ISE)

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> Actually, I think Glad Wrap is an American product that went international.
>  We certainly have it here it Canada (Do you guys have that foolish albino
> Man from Glad too?).

Exqueeze me... Albino man? Who's he? Im in Australia.

"Eagles may soar in the clouds, but weasels never get sucked into jet
engines."
               -- Jason Hutchison

1997\09\28@091001 by Martin McCormick

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       There is a machine called a Thermo form machine which was designed
to copy pages of Braille.  I figured that it was very similar to a blister
packer because it did much the same thing.  It had a perforated table
with a vacuum pump under it, a large clamp which went around the periphery
of the work, and an oven which did look a lot like a toaster oven.  The oven
would reach a preset temperature and start cycling on and off.  There was
a timer control which one set that controlled the amount of, shall we say,
cooking time for the plastic.

       Using the machine involved placing the master on the perforated
screen, a blank sheet of plastic over the master and then locking the clamp.
It was then necessary to slide the oven over the work and wait until the timer
timed out.  At that moment, the vacuum pump started and sucked the now
almost molten plastic down over the master.

       The trick was to set the timer just right or you either got no
copy at all (too little heat), or a badly wrinkled sheet (too much).

       I used this machine in the early seventies so my memory of some
details is a little fuzzy.  This type of system, however, would be a piece
of cake for a PIC.  I remember that the timer in the system I used was a
conventional mechanical device with a synchronous motor so one would have to
make a 60 or 50 HZ version depending upon where it was used.

       When it was tuned just right, it captured amazing surface detail
of whatever was under the sheet.

Martin McCormick

1997\09\29@022942 by by way of euroclass

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This message was sent directly to me, forwarding to the PICLIST

The process you speak of I think of called 'Vacum Forming' this involves
having a mould with small holes in it that gets hot. Heat the mold to the
point when the plastic is flexable then evacuate the air form the mould
causing the plastic to take the form of the mould allow to cool, place item
to be packed, then glue on cardboard or use a plastic coated board and heat
seam it on. Should not be too difficult with assorted bits from the junk box.

Cheers Steve.....

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