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PICList Thread
'OT: getting on'
1999\01\24@175206 by Tony Nixon

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picon face
Just hit the big 4 0 today.

Does this mean I can retire :-)

--
Best regards

Tony

Multimedia 16F84 Beginners PIC Tools.
** NEW PicNPro Programmer and Port Interface **

http://www.picnpoke.com
Email spam_OUTpicnpokeTakeThisOuTspamcdi.com.au

1999\01\25@004138 by Regulus Berdin

picon face
Hi all,

I am wondering! What is the average age of piclist subscribers?
I usually hear stories about the 70s, which unfortunately I was still a
baby.

BTW, I am still 26 :).

regards,
Reggie

Tony Nixon wrote:
{Quote hidden}

1999\01\25@024837 by Glenville T. Sawyer

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face
Glenville T. Sawyer
Outback Communications.   South Australia
Theatre & Concert Lighting, Special Effects & Props. + more !
Also - Embedded Control systems.  http://www.gsawyer.mtx.net
{Original Message removed}

1999\01\25@063318 by Ken Johnson

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face
Right on Glen, I hit the big five-0 just before christmas and can confirm
life just keeps getting better!!

Cheers, (and long time no see- ex vk5ken) Ken, vk7krjspamKILLspamsouthcom.com.au

> BTW   I am rapidly approaching 49 - and I am convinced that "life"
actually
>begins at 50 !!!
>
>       Glenville.
>

1999\01\25@065812 by g.daniel.invent.design
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2^5
regards,
Graham Daniel.

1999\01\25@071854 by Roberto Marchini

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>>Hi all, I am wondering! What is the average age of piclist subscribers?
>>I usually hear stories about the 70s, which unfortunately I was still a
>>baby. BTW, I am still 26 :). regards, Reggie.


My "average age" is 24... but I'm 48.
Ehm.. it's a joke :-)

Roberto

1999\01\25@075049 by Caisson

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> Van: Regulus Berdin <.....rberdinKILLspamspam.....BIGFOOT.COM>
> Aan: EraseMEPICLISTspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Onderwerp: Re: OT: getting on
> Datum: maandag 25 januari 1999 6:42
>
> Hi all,

Hello Regulus,

> I am wondering! What is the average age of piclist subscribers?
> I usually hear stories about the 70s, which unfortunately I was still a
> baby.
>
> BTW, I am still 26 :).

I'm still 26 too ... For the last 11 years ;-)

Greetz,
 Rudy Wieser

1999\01\25@084523 by Reginald Neale

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>Hi all,
>
>I am wondering! What is the average age of piclist subscribers?
>I usually hear stories about the 70s, which unfortunately I was still a
>baby.
>
>BTW, I am still 26 :).
>
>regards,
>Reggie
>

 I'd make a wild uninformed guess that the average age is in the
 thirties or forties somewhere, but there is an enormous range.

 I turned (2^6)-1 last Christmas day and I'm certainly not
 the oldest one.

 The Other Reggie

1999\01\25@092852 by ryan pogge

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im 18
----- Original Message -----
From: Reginald Neale <nealespamspam_OUTSERVTECH.COM>
To: <@spam@PICLISTKILLspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Sent: Monday, January 25, 1999 8:43 AM
Subject: Re: OT: getting on


{Quote hidden}

1999\01\25@094425 by robert a. moeser

picon face
Tony Nixon <KILLspamTony.NixonKILLspamspamENG.MONASH.EDU.AU> wrote:

>Just hit the big 4 0 today.

>Does this mean I can retire :-)

hmmm, if that's #040h mebbe we'll let you.

-- rob, still in his 20s (#02Bh!)

1999\01\25@095229 by Joe and Pam

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I'm 30.

1999\01\25@102707 by keithh

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"Life" began many millions of years ago.

My own (non-foetal) life began on the 25th June 1964. Thus I'm 34.

My first 21 yrs were a stony road to graduation.

Then they said "Go for it!"


So I went for it.


It had gone.

1999\01\25@103707 by Andy David

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face
I'm approximately (2^5)-pi, but feeling more like pi*2^5, at the moment...


- Andy.

----------------------------------------------------------
Andrew David, Software Manager, Ultronics Ltd, Cheltenham.
RemoveMEakdavidTakeThisOuTspamUltronics.co.uk          http://www.ultronics.com/
----------------------------------------------------------

1999\01\25@111145 by Lynx {Glenn Jones}

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Im 16.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
A member of the PI-100 Club:
3.1415926535897932384626433832795028841971693993751
058209749445923078164062862089986280348253421170679

1999\01\25@143520 by Kelly J. Kohls

picon face
>Hi all,
>
>I am wondering! What is the average age of piclist subscribers?
>I usually hear stories about the 70s, which unfortunately I was still a
>baby.
>
>BTW, I am still 26 :).
>
>regards,
>Reggie

I turned 33 on January 21st.

Kelly Kohls
Amateur Radio Callsign: N5TLE
Email Address: spamBeGonekkohlsspamBeGonespamjuno.com
Homepage URL: http://www.qsl.net/n5tle/

___________________________________________________________________
You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail.
Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com/getjuno.html
or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]

1999\01\25@145241 by kfisk

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That's the beauty of the Internet. Who cares how old you are! It's the
exchange of information that's important.

Cheers,

Kevin

{Quote hidden}

1999\01\25@161347 by

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>That's the beauty of the Internet. Who cares how old you are! It's the
>exchange of information that's important.

>Cheers,

>Kevin

 I would say "human beings exchanging information"....my computer doesn't
care how old you are, but me...probably. I will be 0x28 on  July the 4th of Y2K.

Eddy

1999\01\25@200105 by dporter

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Hi all,
I can remember in high school seeing articles about fluidics.  You could
machine a thin piece of metal or plastic and make a flip flop out of it.
You could make a whole slew of flip flops in less volume than a drafting
eraser.  Obviously, with this level of miniaturization, the future of
electronics was limited.

You could buy a Nuvistor that was only a little bigger than a transistor.
Yes, you could still get the good old Raytheon CK-722 transistor.  Never
could get one of them to work. Selenium diodes were everywhere, silicon
diodes could be had if you could afford them and didn't want very high
PIV's.  Electrolytic capacitors leaked...physically not necessarily
electrically.  Tunnel diodes were written about in Scientific American.
Time was being kept on battery-powered  transistor-driven tuning forks
otherwise known as Bulova Accutrons.  You could still buy "B" batteries, 90
to 125 volts, for "portable" radios.  Vibrators, not what you think, were
still around as replacement parts to switch the 6 volt auto electric
circuits through a transformer to generate the B+.

A key troubleshooting tool was available from RCA.  It looked like a wooden
pencil with two large erasers at right angles to the pencil, a little like
a two headed hammer.  It was used to tap on tubes and see which ones
sparked, or flashed or otherwise failed.  This test was the second or third
thing you tried in troubleshooting...never fourth!  Portable meters were
invariably volt-ohm-meters.  Cheap ones were 1000 ohms per volt, expensive
ones were 20000.  Vacuum Tube Volt Meters (VTVM's) were as accurate as
anyone needed and they had an input resistance of 11 M ohms.

The calculator you used was often referred to as a "sly drool",
"slipstick", or even an analog computer.  Heathkit sold an analog computer
for around $700, mostly to schools.

By the way, I'm 52.  Born the same year as the transistor, and the first
oil well drilled by the US in Iran.  And somehow, I feel like I'm just a
baby.  I used to have a collection of QST magazines going back to the
1940's.

As a young kid, I remember days before television.  We seemed to have a lot
more time then.  But then I digress from my previous digressions.

Dave
RemoveMEdporterspamTakeThisOuTvoicenet.com




----------
{Quote hidden}

1999\01\26@031537 by Pedro Drummond

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I am 22H (hex).

Pedro.

1999\01\26@043425 by Dr. Imre Bartfai

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Hi,
and I'm 44. I had worked on S360 (IBM Mainframe), Z80, i8086, V30, 8051,
PIC, ...

Imre


On Mon, 25 Jan 1999, ryan pogge wrote:

> im 18
> {Original Message removed}

1999\01\26@072920 by Tom Handley

picon face
  Ken, I just turned 49 and it's nice to know there are so many others
here that remember the same Rock'n'Roll ;-)

  Actually, I'm amazed I'm still alive... I wish it were possible to
get all of us who remember the `Golden Era' of microprocessors, to write
a book. Like veterans, we all have been down similar paths and have a lot
of stories to share.

  - Tom

At 10:26 PM 1/25/99 +1100, Ken Johnson wrote:
{Quote hidden}

1999\01\26@072923 by Tom Handley

picon face
>My "average age" is 24... but I'm 48.
>Ehm.. it's a joke :-)
>
>Roberto

  Roberto, LOL!!! Actually my age varies. Last summer I thought I was
18 and my broken ankle kept me down for two months. Other times, I
could swear I was 90 (argghhh...) ;-)

  - Tom

1999\01\26@083920 by Steve Jones

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I'll buy a copy of the book when it's complete!!

-Steve


-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Handley <RemoveMEthandleyspam_OUTspamKILLspamTELEPORT.COM>
To: RemoveMEPICLISTTakeThisOuTspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU <EraseMEPICLISTspamspamspamBeGoneMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Date: Tuesday, January 26, 1999 7:29 AM
Subject: Re: OT: getting on


{Quote hidden}

1999\01\26@084753 by Rich Graziano

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I will be 59 in April.
-----Original Message-----
From: Reginald Neale <nealeSTOPspamspamspam_OUTSERVTECH.COM>
To: spamBeGonePICLISTSTOPspamspamEraseMEMITVMA.MIT.EDU <KILLspamPICLISTspamBeGonespamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Date: Monday, January 25, 1999 8:44 AM
Subject: Re: OT: getting on


{Quote hidden}

1999\01\26@094930 by Dan Larson

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On Tue, 26 Jan 1999 04:24:46 -0800, Tom Handley wrote:

>   Ken, I just turned 49 and it's nice to know there are so many others
>here that remember the same Rock'n'Roll ;-)
>
>   Actually, I'm amazed I'm still alive... I wish it were possible to
>get all of us who remember the `Golden Era' of microprocessors, to write
>a book. Like veterans, we all have been down similar paths and have a lot
>of stories to share.
>

I was just a kid, but I was inspired early on by a series of
articles or just a single article on the "PIP-2".  A four
bit home-brew micro I think.  I read the article and never saw
it again.  I wanted to build one really bad.  Then I followed
the ELF-II series.  I built a kit version with the nice PC
board & keypad.  Broke my machine code teeth on the 1802.
When I got my TRS-80, I was doing Z-80.  BASIC was no fun...
too slow, although much easier when it came to doing math!
Let's see,,,, then on to the Radio Shack Color Computer... 6809
assembly there.... Oooh, I'll stop there..... It gets ugly
after that.... (PC's).

One thing for sure.... I never learned to trust
storing anything on tapes of any kind again after
living through *that* era!

Dan

BTW, I've been representing my age with 6 bits for 4
years now...




{Quote hidden}

1999\01\26@100419 by Ray Gardiner

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<snip>
>>
>>  I'd make a wild uninformed guess that the average age is in the
>>  thirties or forties somewhere, but there is an enormous range.
>>
>>  I turned (2^6)-1 last Christmas day and I'm certainly not
>>  the oldest one.
>>
>>  The Other Reggie

Well, I'm 49 heading to 50 this year, and I suspect that there is
a higher representation in the 45-55 age group than you might expect.
Those who were like me, in their early 20's when micro's first became
readily available.

I remember the Ohio Scientific, we used to make add-on memory cards
and stuff for it. But my real favourite of those times was the AIM 65
It had a "assembler" well kind of a mnemonic translator anyway.
On board printer and an alphanumeric display. 2K of 2114's.. There
was even a version of fig-Forth in eprom.

Programming PIC's is a bit like those early days, except everything
now is cheaper faster lower-powered.

How many folks out there can remember converting "golf-ball" typewriters
and Model 15 teletypes to print out memory dumps and then spending days
and days poring over them to find some miscalculated branch or corrupted
memory location.... I can't imagine doing that anymore!...


Ray Gardiner VK3YNV  @spam@ray@spam@spamspam_OUThdc.com.au

1999\01\26@111202 by Rich Graziano

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Perhaps the MEDIAN age would be a better measure than the MEAN.
-----Original Message-----
From: Ray Gardiner <spamBeGonerayspamKILLspamHDC.COM.AU>
To: .....PICLISTspam_OUTspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU <TakeThisOuTPICLIST.....spamTakeThisOuTMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Date: Tuesday, January 26, 1999 10:03 AM
Subject: Re: OT: getting on


{Quote hidden}

1999\01\26@124825 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
At 11:02 01/26/99 -0500, Rich Graziano wrote:
>Perhaps the MEDIAN age would be a better measure than the MEAN.

in any case mine became 39 yesterday. my first birthday in the usa. did you
know that they want the exact date of =any= previous visit to the usa from
new residents in the first tax declaration? i have no way of finding that
out and answering that question "truthfully." maybe that's a provision to
always be able to legally deport me later, if they decide they want to do
that... :-)

ge

1999\01\26@133310 by w. v. ooijen / f. hanneman

picon face
I'm 36.
I was a little bit too late for the 'golden age', but I used to read
Osborne's book on microprocessors (part III, everything from MicroNova and
1802 to 8086, 99000 and 68000) before I got to sleep. I designed my own
CP/M computers on paper, but never got to build them. I'm a software
professional, but with a soft spot for hardware.
Wouter.

1999\01\26@202538 by Lynx {Glenn Jones}

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Im 16, and a senior in high school.

1999\01\26@215333 by Maris

picon face
I turned 59 this month.
Back in my day we had to walk 20 miles barefoot in the snow to program
PICs. We made our own chips from melted sand and programmed them using
Roman numerals. We were REAL programmers back then, not wussies using
assemblers and programming languages.

- Maris -

1999\01\26@221650 by Bill Colville

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>   I'd make a wild uninformed guess that the average age is in the
>   thirties or forties somewhere, but there is an enormous range.
>
>   I turned (2^6)-1 last Christmas day and I'm certainly not
>   the oldest one.
>
>   The Other Reggie
>

I was going to keep my mouth shut, but I am 14.2 lustrum old and
have had the Amateur call W3NMK since 1947.

Cheers,   Bill

1999\01\26@225648 by Paul Justice

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Well looks like you are all kids, I'm going on 61.  Boy that is hard to say,
just does not seem that much time has passed.  zzzzzzzzzz oh yes, where was
I?

I started working on computers in the mid 60's when the registers consisted
of flip-flops constructed from transistors, diodes and resistors(talk about
low level trouble shooting).  This was before integrated circuits, they may
have been invented by that time but I had never heard of them.

Well my first computer was a Southwest Tech, It was a kit (the only way it
came) 6800 CPU and a whopping 4K static ram(pre dynamic).  It had the
switches on the front panel so you could load your program one byte at a
time.  In those days the terminal of choice was a Teletype (110 or 300
baud).  The next machine I owned was an Apple II with 16K memory and a
keyboard, a Sony TV was the monitor.  There was no floppy disk drives
available when I bought the machine but Apple promised they would start
shipping them in a few months.  I had never seen a floppy but wanted one bad
enough to place a deposit (90% of the cost) for one when I bought the Apple
II.

Time has been good to the microprocessor world and I am glad.

I am just getting involved with microcontrollers and to me it is very
exciting because it reminds me of the 70's.

Let the good times roll!!!

Paul Justice

1999\01\27@005448 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
   Back in my day we had to walk 20 miles barefoot in the snow to program
   PICs. We made our own chips from melted sand and programmed them using
   Roman numerals. We were REAL programmers back then, not wussies using
   assemblers and programming languages.

I'm 39.  While the above is amusing, it's pretty sobering to think that
I first became interested in PICs about 10 years ago, when they were
first available from parallax, and were (I think) the first small-pinout
micro to hit the market.  While 10 years doesn't seem so long ago to me,
some of our younger list members were still in grade school...

BillW

1999\01\27@025048 by synergetix

picon face
William Westfield wrote:

>While 10 years doesn't seem so long ago to me,
> some of our younger list members were still in grade school...

Hell, I wasn't even in school yet!!  Only the PIClist could bridge such
a generation gap...

                               Synergetix

1999\01\27@034003 by Alvaro Deibe Diaz

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I'm 32. The first I programmed were 8080, Z80 and 6502. And my first
operating system CP/M.

1999\01\27@035249 by Russell McMahon

picon face
>I'm 39.  While the above is amusing, it's pretty sobering to think
that
>I first became interested in PICs about 10 years ago, when they were
>first available from parallax, and were (I think) the first
small-pinout
>micro to hit the market.  While 10 years doesn't seem so long ago to
me,
>some of our younger list members were still in grade school...
>
>BillW
>

Depends on what counts as "small pinout".
There were "20 something" pin 6805 versions (24? 28?) before that
(back in them thar NMOS days).

Motorola made a 16 pin "1 bit" processor (Don't ask!!!) (MC144xx???)
before that, possibly early 80's or before, which had about 8
instructions. ALL instructions were cycled through in sequence with
the logic unit being turned off and on as required to process
instructions. Branching back a few instructions could be rather slow!

       Russell McMahon

1999\01\27@054646 by Dmitry Kiryashov

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Regulus Berdin wrote:
>
> Hi all,
>
> I am wondering! What is the average age of piclist subscribers?
> I usually hear stories about the 70s, which unfortunately I was
> still a baby.

.. And walking under the computer's table - isn't it ? ;-))
Just a piece of russian humor.

WBR Dmitry.

1999\01\27@054651 by Dmitry Kiryashov

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Regulus Berdin wrote:
>
> Hi all,
>
> I am wondering! What is the average age of piclist subscribers?
> I usually hear stories about the 70s, which unfortunately I was still
a
> baby.
>
> BTW, I am still 26 :).

Hello Reggie ;-)

As I've seen I'm not a little 28 year aged one among the giants ...
This probably promise that computer's spirit will never dissapear ;-)

WBR Dmitry.

1999\01\27@054700 by Dmitry Kiryashov

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Tony Nixon wrote:
>
> Just hit the big 4 0 today.
>
> Does this mean I can retire :-)

I think you shouldn't ;-) Because you age isn't equal to 2^7 - 1 and
overflow isn't expected for the following 127 - 40 = 87 years ;-))

WBR Dmitry.

PS. Y2K problem has tired me very much due to assmedia stupidity.

1999\01\27@071554 by Bob Drzyzgula

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00101010 here, just old enough to recall, as a toddler,
seeing John Kennedy in a US presidential campaign
appearance in Utica, NY.

First computer experience was a BASIC program written for
a computer at the Hercules plant in Hudson (or was it
Glens?) Falls, NY, around 1970 or so -- a Boy Scout field
trip.

Worked with an IBM 1130 in college (running a custom,
local-written DOS... had three error codes, "hung",
"loop" and "stop", all of which were at the discretion
of the operator based on what the register lights were
doing), lots of IBM 360s (20, 75, 91, etc) in the late
'70s and early '80s -- anyone else recall submitting jobs
on card punch decks to OS/MFT? TSO was a big improvement...
"that 300K region only has three jobs in the queue;
if I cut my data set in half I can probably squeze
into that..."

My first first real job was in 1980 as a contractor
at NASA Goddard; besides the IBMs, we used lots of DEC
machines... PDP-8, PDP-11. RSTS-11, RSX-11M, standalone
Forth. One PDP-8 we used to run a microdensitometer,
one had to toggle in the boot loader so it could  read the
OS off of the paper tape reader on the teletype terminal,
or the 800bpi 1/2" magtape.

At my current job we started using Suns in 1985,
with the Sun 2/120. We've gone through hundreds of
them since, and expect to be all UltraSPARC this
year; the capabilities of these new machines
are utterly staggering in a historical context.

Like many have reported, Microcontrollers and embedded
stuff is new to me, but I'm enjoying them in a way
that I haven't enjoyed computers in recent memory.

--Bob

--
============================================================
Bob Drzyzgula                             It's not a problem
.....bobspamRemoveMEdrzyzgula.org                until something bad happens
============================================================

1999\01\27@080205 by Michael Rigby-Jones

flavicon
face
But you tell that to kids today, and they won't believe you....
(Copyright Monty Python)

Mike Rigby-Jones
RemoveMEmrjonesspamspamBeGonenortelnetworks.com

{Quote hidden}

1999\01\27@080212 by Tom Handley

picon face
  Hahaha, Maris! Reminds me of a Monty Python routine. "But tell that
to kids today!" ;-)

  - Tom

At 09:33 PM 1/26/99 -0500, Maris wrote:
>I turned 59 this month.
>Back in my day we had to walk 20 miles barefoot in the snow to program
>PICs. We made our own chips from melted sand and programmed them using
>Roman numerals. We were REAL programmers back then, not wussies using
>assemblers and programming languages.
>
>- Maris -

1999\01\27@090155 by Reginald Neale

flavicon
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Bill Colville said:

>I was going to keep my mouth shut, but I am 14.2 lustrum old and
>have had the Amateur call W3NMK since 1947.
>
 Wow!. Not often someone sends me scrambling for the dictionary.
 I knew there was someone older (and wiser!) lurking here. But I
 AM an old-timer. When I got into electronics, ANALOG computers
 were dominant. In addition to the sly drool, I mean. They used
 vacuum tubes. I still have some of the old Philbrick Computing
 plug-in modules.

********************************************************************

 Back in MY day, we didn't have no fancy high numbers. We only had
 "nothing," "one," "twain," or "multitudes." Or you could hold up
 digits to show how many. Maximum twenty for women, twenty-one for
 men.

 (from an Internet "Back in MY day" contest)

 Reg Neale

1999\01\27@090419 by Walter Banks

picon face
> Back in my day we had to walk 20 miles barefoot in the snow

Me, I had a modern convience, a horse to ride to school (for real).

Early computers were fun the first compiler I wrote was for the IBM1620
an BCD computer with 20000 digits of memory it was slow but you
could add two 4000 digit numbers together with one instruction.
I believe that you could emulate the IBM-1620 with one of the 12bit core
PIC's and 16K of I2C memory, much faster too. The IBM-1620
cost about $65/hour to run at a time engineers earned $4000/year

Good old days, nahhhh!!

W..

1999\01\27@091510 by Harrison Cooper

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face
my my, and nobody has mentioned the good ol TRS-80 Model I.  In fact, still
have the one I played with that my dad brought home one day.  Oh...seems
that he was having some problems with the TRS-DOS and the BASIC on it, so he
found the place that wrote some of the software.  Small company in
Washington.  Talked to this guy named Bill....

Final config of the machine was four 5-1/4 floppys, expansion interface, a
REAL centronics printer, modem and a FORTRAN compiler.

1999\01\27@101826 by Matt Bonner

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Tom Handley wrote:
>
>    Hahaha, Maris! Reminds me of a Monty Python routine. "But tell that
> to kids today!" ;-)
>
How about "Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy"?  Next month my age will
equate to the 'meaning of life' divulged in the final episode.

--Matt

1999\01\27@121445 by David W. Duley

picon face
In a message dated 1/27/99 7:28:36 AM Pacific Standard Time,
mbonnerEraseMEspamSUNADA.COM writes:

<< How about "Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy"?  Next month my age will
equate to the 'meaning of life' divulged in the final episode.

--Matt

 >>
What is 6 X 7?  Oh...sorry that was the question of life.
Dave Duley

1999\01\27@125749 by Justin Crooks

flavicon
face
I'm 0x16, and have been programming microcontrollers professionally for
only a couple of years.  It's good to see the age diversity on this list!

----------
> From: Lynx {Glenn Jones} <RemoveMEjones_glEraseMEspamspam_OUTEFN.ORG>
> To: @spam@PICLISTRemoveMEspamEraseMEMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Subject: Re: OT: getting on
> Date: Tuesday, January 26, 1999 6:23 PM
>
> Im 16, and a senior in high school.

1999\01\27@162159 by gregnash

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If I try and write my age in hex I'll probably get an error from the list
server -- I can't remember whether the '$' goes before or after the number...
(yeh, my first programming after TRS-80 BASIC was 6502 assembler on Apple ][
)

That places me twice as young as some of you, and half as young as others.
Nice and comfy in the middle.  You're all right, though, it is amazing to
consider the changes in even 15 years...   Once upon a time people were lucky
to see _anything_ much change in their _lifetime_.  Perhaps a country or two
would get taken over.  Someone might build a nicer buggy for their horse.  Now
people are amazed that I started life with black&white TV, and people not much
older without it.

I was rather amused when I found the design for a 'pong' TV game on the web
using a PIC, a transistor and a couple of passive components..  We thought
that was such exciting technology then..

--
      ______
,----/      \----,  Greg Nash  EraseMEgnashspam@spam@namoicotton.com.au
 \   |      |   /   Namoi Cotton, PO Box 58, Wee Waa 2388
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     |  |\_/|
     oooooooo       http://www.geocities.com/Nashville/Opry/8450/

1999\01\27@163922 by Martin McCormick

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       I am 47.

1999\01\27@171012 by Peter Schultz

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Hi All,
I am going to be 40 next weekend. It feels pretty bad.
PeterS
Peter Schultz
<spamBeGoneschupetEraseMEspamdvp.com>
DVP Inc.
3430 Ocean View Blvd. Unit A
Glendale, CA
(818) 541-9020
Fax: (818) 541-9423

1999\01\27@171406 by Eric Oliver

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   Back in my day we had to walk 20 miles barefoot in the snow to program
   PICs. We made our own chips from melted sand and programmed them using
   Roman numerals. We were REAL programmers back then, not wussies using
   assemblers and programming languages.

ROFL !! We have a winner ...

Eric Oliver

1999\01\27@171817 by Stuart O'Reilly

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I turn 28 in April, my first computer was a Microbee with 16k of ram and a
Z80, I still use it for all my applications that need speed, if speed
isn't an issue I just turn on my Pent Pro and do it the slow way.
Stu.

P.S. You think you had it hard, I used to live in a rolled up news paper
in a septic tank.

Maris wrote:

> I turned 59 this month.
> Back in my day we had to walk 20 miles barefoot in the snow to program
> PICs. We made our own chips from melted sand and programmed them using
> Roman numerals. We were REAL programmers back then, not wussies using
> assemblers and programming languages.
>
> - Maris -

1999\01\27@212451 by Russell McMahon

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But to what base?
Many people don't realise that this was meant to be to base thirteen
(decimal)

ie the question was

   What do you get when you multiply 6 times  9

The answer was, of course -

   42


           Russell McMahon

>How about "Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy"?  Next month my age
will
>equate to the 'meaning of life' divulged in the final episode.
>
>--Matt
>

1999\01\27@232753 by dporter

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You had Feet????  :-)

----------
> From: Maris <marisspamBeGonespamTIAC.NET>
> To: RemoveMEPICLIST@spam@spamspamBeGoneMITVMA.MIT.EDU
> Subject: Re: OT: getting on
> Date: Tuesday, January 26, 1999 9:33 PM
>
> I turned 59 this month.
> Back in my day we had to walk 20 miles barefoot in the snow to program
> PICs. We made our own chips from melted sand and programmed them using
> Roman numerals. We were REAL programmers back then, not wussies using
> assemblers and programming languages.
>
> - Maris -

1999\01\28@014725 by Vadim Jakunin

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hi,

Im 00100011b, and I hopes on greater, than left shift!


Oooh,  with what shit I have to work!


Best regards,
Vadim                            .....vad@spam@spamEraseMEanet.lv

1999\01\28@043818 by Roberto Marchini

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At 03.54 26/01/1999 -0800, you wrote:
>>My "average age" is 24... but I'm 48.
>>Ehm.. it's a joke :-)
>>
>>Roberto
>
>   Roberto, LOL!!! Actually my age varies. Last summer I thought I was
>18 and my broken ankle kept me down for two months. Other times, I
>could swear I was 90 (argghhh...) ;-)
>
>   - Tom

My age INCF regularly every year... but I think not for the eternity.
Sooner or later the carry will be set :-)

Seriously.
I'm from Turin, North West of Italy
My studies was in industrial electronic but my passion was programming.
My first informatic love was a C64 and his 6510, many years ago.
The first time I play it from 09:00 PM to 05:00 AM !!!
My face in the morning was:
     |||||
     O = O
       &
      ~~~
       W

My first work was a GWBASIC programm for automatic test equipment.
At present I'm working always in automotive ATE project or similar but my
experiences are only in software/firmware, my brother is the hardware-man:
- Quick Basic 4.5 on PC/MSDOS system based with I/O cards (10 year)
- Visual Basic (only 1 project)
- DB3
- DYNAMIC C on ZWORLD microcontroller (2 year) (any list or pointer?)
 - programmable ohmmeter with data files, PC interface, printer interface
 - a math inteface for a PIC based data acquisition card and a PLC
 - programmable multi-timer
- assembly on PIC micro (3 year):
 - IEE488 interface for 2 channel power supply (HP emulation)
 - RS232 interface for 5 banks x 8 cards x 2 channels power supply
 - programmable ramp generator
 - driver for multiple coil test
 - data acquisition card
 - serial I/O expander (with keypad/display interface) for a ZWORLD
microcontroller
I'm not an expert and I like the piclist because I learn many things
Thanks all.
Roberto
/*
sorry for my bad english
*/

1999\01\28@045622 by Michael Rigby-Jones

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> At 03.54 26/01/1999 -0800, you wrote:
> >>My "average age" is 24... but I'm 48.
> >>Ehm.. it's a joke :-)
> >>
> >>Roberto
> >
> >   Roberto, LOL!!! Actually my age varies. Last summer I thought I was
> >18 and my broken ankle kept me down for two months. Other times, I
> >could swear I was 90 (argghhh...) ;-)
> >
> >   - Tom
>
> My age INCF regularly every year... but I think not for the eternity.
> Sooner or later the carry will be set :-)
>
PIC Programmers never die, their carry flag just gets set!
May you'll just roll over to 0x00 and start again...

Mike Rigby-Jones
.....mrjonesRemoveMEspamnortelnetworks.com

1999\01\28@054438 by Tom Handley

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  Matt, you got me there. It's been awhile since I've seen it. I
remember Eric Idle popping out of the refrigerator singing about the
universe which would make you quite old and Michael Palin summing it
up in the end which would make you quite young ;-)

  - Tom

At 08:20 AM 1/27/99 -0700, Matt wrote:
{Quote hidden}

1999\01\28@081420 by mjurras

picon face
Next year I'll be -60 ... now back to fixing my Y2K problem...
_________________________________________________________
DO YOU YAHOO!?
Get your free @yahoo.com address at http://mail.yahoo.com

1999\01\28@100928 by Matt Bonner

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I wrote:
> >How about "Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy"?  Next month my age
> >will equate to the 'meaning of life' divulged in the final episode.

Russell McMahon wrote:
{Quote hidden}

And to Russell goes the prestigious "Arthur Dent" award!  :-)

--Matt

1999\01\28@101317 by dave vanhorn

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>And to Russell goes the prestigious "Arthur Dent" award!  :-)

Does he get something to hang it on?

1999\01\28@121853 by Morgan Olsson

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Something for the younger lads on this list to study?

Obsolete Computer Museum!

http://www.ncsc.dni.us/fun/user/tcc/cmuseum/cmuseum.htm

/Morgan
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
   Morgan Olsson                       ph  +46(0)414 70741
   MORGANS REGLERTEKNIK                fax +46(0)414 70331
   H€LLEKS               (in A-Z letters: "HALLEKAS")
   SE-277 35 KIVIK, SWEDEN                   .....mrtSTOPspamspam@spam@iname.com
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

1999\01\28@130557 by Matt Bonner

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dave vanhorn wrote:
>
> >And to Russell goes the prestigious "Arthur Dent" award!  :-)
>
> Does he get something to hang it on?

Let's not go there!  We've seen from this thread that there are
impressionable youngsters on the list. ;-)

--Matt

1999\01\28@143308 by Troy P.

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I am 35.

1999\01\28@144144 by WF AUTOMACAO

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Troy P. wrote:
>
> I am 35.

I'm 28 until April 22! :)

Your friend, mIGUEL

1999\01\29@020503 by John

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Hello PIC.ers,

"You were lucky....  we lived in't cardboard box at bottom of lake"

Another vet. whose first exposure to computers was the 2nd hand all-valve
basement monster (DEC? maybe) donated by an oil refinery to our local
university. (circa 1970).
Some privileged postgrads had been allowed to cut their teeth programming
it..... to shoot noughts and crosses.
Inputs via toggle switches. Outputs, relays and filament lamps.
All nicely mounted in a varnished wooden box.


best regards,   John (0x02C)

e-mail from the desk of John Sanderson, JS Controls.
Snailmail:          PO Box 1887, Boksburg 1460, Rep. of South Africa.
Tel/fax:            Johannesburg  893 4154
Cellphone no:   082 469 0446
email:                jsandEraseMEspam@spam@pixie.co.za
Manufacturer & purveyor of laboratory force testing apparatus, and related
products and services.

1999\01\29@163307 by Mark Willis

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o50 aka 0x28 myself.  (Can anyone tell I've used CDC machines a bit?
<G>)  I want a vacation, just one, before the big 0x40, that's my big
aspiration for myself...

 Mark


'OT: getting on'
1999\02\01@014215 by goflo
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Is that synodic or sidereal lustra?

Jack

Bill Colville wrote:

{Quote hidden}

1999\02\01@042402 by Mark Willis

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Harrison Cooper wrote:
>
> my my, and nobody has mentioned the good ol TRS-80 Model I.  In fact, still
> have the one I played with that my dad brought home one day.  Oh...seems
> that he was having some problems with the TRS-DOS and the BASIC on it, so he
> found the place that wrote some of the software.  Small company in
> Washington.  Talked to this guy named Bill....
>
> Final config of the machine was four 5-1/4 floppys, expansion interface, a
> REAL centronics printer, modem and a FORTRAN compiler.

 ...  And, as a free bonus, it would sometimes over-write one of those
4 floppys, if you had a power glitch (Model I level III that a Search
and Rescue group I was in, was kept on a local air force base, to do the
computer work for their Search section;  they had horrible awful
problems as they wouldn't budget a UPS for the machine.  Seems the
industrial motors (engine start carts, maybe?) were causing problems -
Ewww.  I'd moved out of state at the time, fortunately <G>)

 I'd forgotten that, fortunately, until I read this <G>

 Mark, 40/Kent, WA, RemoveMEmwillisspamspamBeGonenwlink.com

1999\02\02@081610 by Paul BRITTON

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Does anyone here still own/remeber the Sinclair(Timex, in the States)
ZX81?

I've still got two in my loft somewhere, I think!!


Paul

1999\02\02@102306 by Nigel Orr

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At 12:29 02/02/99 +0000, you wrote:
>Does anyone here still own/remeber the Sinclair(Timex, in the States)
>ZX81?

I've got a still functioning Spectrum+, with microdrives- does that count-
only 2 years later...

Nigel

1999\02\02@161655 by Adam Bryant

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I've got one I built from a kit when I was 17.  Been thinking lately that I
need to interface it to a PIC.  Anyone know where I can find assembler code
examples (Z80 of course) for accessing the bus lines on the external
connector of the ZX81?





spamBeGonePaul.BRITTONKILLspamspam@spam@MMSUK.CO.UK on 02/02/99 05:29:59 AM

Please respond to PICLISTspam_OUTspam@spam@MITVMA.MIT.EDU

To:   spamBeGonePICLIST@spam@spamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
cc:    (bcc: Adam Bryant/PEAK/MOORE)
Subject:  Re: OT: getting on




Does anyone here still own/remeber the Sinclair(Timex, in the States)
ZX81?
I've still got two in my loft somewhere, I think!!

Paul

1999\02\02@170916 by William Chops Westfield

face picon face
   I've got one I built from a kit when I was 17.  Been thinking lately that I
   need to interface it to a PIC.  Anyone know where I can find assembler code
   examples (Z80 of course) for accessing the bus lines on the external
   connector of the ZX81?

There seems to be something of a cult following for the ZX80/81.  I forget
exactly what I was searching for, but I once found complete plans for
building a ZX80 (from scratch, using ttl.)  I think they had the OS/basic
code there too, as well as other information.

I built a ZX81 kit and gave it to my mom for Christmass one year, although
I don't think that particular experiment turned out so well.  (Mom now surfs
the web, though...)

BillW

1999\02\02@221422 by Bill Colville

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goflo wrote:

<Is that synodic or sidereal lustra?

That is a good question!
Not quite being around when the ancient Romans used the term
lustrum as a time measurement, I can't come up with a definitive
answer. A synodic year is approximately 354 days, a sidereal year
is approximately 324 days, and the presently used solar year is
approximately 365 days. Take your pick.

I'll bet I got at least a few people to blow the dust off their
dictionaries.

Cheers,  Bill

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