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'Newbee question'
1995\03\14@131706 by surajit talukder

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This is a repost !!


>
> Sheesh, but that is a broad question. My suggestion is that you call up
> Intel, Motorola, and Microchip representatives in your area (these may
> be distributors or field offices) and ask to speak to a "Technical Sales
> Engineer" or "The person in product marketing responsible for the <xx>"
> (insert the name of the processor). Then tell them you are planning a
> microcontroller design and are looking for a processor to design in.
> Tell them you are considering these three processors. Ask if they have
> any literature on the advantages of their processor with respect to these
> others.
>
> What you should get are three biased accounts, biased toward the processor
> they make. Then read them all and decide what you want.
>
>
> --Chuck
>


'Newbee question'
1999\10\18@101229 by TOM VILLANI
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Hello list,
I've just recently found out about PIC devices- I'm building an
altimeter for high power rocketry and I was trying to understand the
basics of PIC chips.
I'm using the PIC16C711 chip
How does one write the code-- what 'tools' are required ?  is the code
C++ ?
What is the format of the code when 'burning' the on board PROM? i.e.
what do I select on my PROM burner ? is it binary, or hex or..?
TIA
Tom [MSEE but PIC ignorant]

1999\10\18@120839 by John C. Frenzel

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Tom,
The tools are more important than the chip.   Microchip supplies an
assembler free for the download at their website http://www.microchip.com .
Take a look at the datasheets of the device families and pick one that has
the items that you need in your application.   Also, the 16f84 series is
very popular due to the use of flash memory instead of eprom.  To erase
flash, it happens in the programmer, eprom requires UV, and is slower.   All
sorts of high level lang. tools are available, C and Basic being the most
common.   Alot of the answers to your questions can be found on this list in
the archives.
John
.
{Quote hidden}

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Bid and sell for free at http://auctions.yahoo.com

1999\10\18@123754 by Bruce Holmen

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>What is the format of the code when 'burning' the on board PROM? i.e.
>what do I select on my PROM burner ? is it binary, or hex or..?
>TIA
>Tom [MSEE but PIC ignorant]
>

Tom,

The file used to "burn" the PIC is in hex format.  A PIC programmer is
used rather than an EPROM burner.  I have been using the EPIC Plus
Pocket Programmer http://www.melabs.com/mel/home.htm along with their
In-Circuit Programming Adapter.

This adapter has a relay that switches my 16F84 into my target circuit
or into the programmer.  This really speeds up the task of checking out
modifications to your program.

Bruce Holmen

.

1999\10\18@135811 by TOM VILLANI

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Thanks,
But where can I find the list archives?
Tom

"John C. Frenzel" wrote:

{Quote hidden}

1999\10\18@141235 by Quentin

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TOM VILLANI wrote:
>
> Thanks,
> But where can I find the list archives?
> Tom
>
Here you go:
http://www.iversoft.com/piclist/
up to Feb. 1999.
>From March 1999 all messages are added in realtime at:
http://www.infosite.com/%7Ejkeyzer/piclist/index.html

Quentin

1999\10\18@160910 by l.allen

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Tom Wrote


> I've just recently found out about PIC devices- I'm building an
> altimeter for high power rocketry and I was trying to understand the
> basics of PIC chips.
> I'm using the PIC16C711 chip
> How does one write the code-- what 'tools' are required ?  is the code
> C++ ?
> What is the format of the code when 'burning' the on board PROM? i.e.
> what do I select on my PROM burner ? is it binary, or hex or..?
> TIA
> Tom [MSEE but PIC ignorant]

In my humble and probably distorted opinion... I'd rather poke myself
in the eye with a sharp stick ( or have Oral Surgery.. which I am off
to have done in 3 hours) than use any language other than assembler.

You just cant get tighter code than assembler and this matters where
memory is measured in bytes, not kbytes or Mbytes.
I have to admit its not the easiest to learn but I would venture that
neither is C or Basic IF you haven't learnt these languages
previously.

Assembler is a bit rude when one is used to nice structured
programming techniques where "goto's" are filthy words and "objects"
are created to be linked to an application with ease, size doesn't
matter in such limitless memory environment.

There are also the benefits of not having to pay for the assembler
(MPASM etc) and not having to hunt down language related errors (C
compiler not liking your PC environment etc).

I would strongly recommend you start with an Flash programme memory
based PIC such as the 16F84, or 16F877. Reprogramming is fast, the
old burn and try method, cheep but works.. all be it slow.
I also strongly recommend the PICStart programmer for painless
programming.. its not that expensive and comes with all the
programmes to get you up and running (although you can download them
from Microchip for free anyway).
It will also seemlessly take you from code to programmed
MicroController, the defaults are all set just right, you just have
to set the Oscillator type and PIC number etc when asked too.

Its REALLY easy compared to other environments I have used on other
controllers.

If you really want to get into PIC code development check out the PIC
ICD for the 16F877 offered by Microchip, for $200 or so it does a
moderate impersonation of an ICE.


_____________________________

Lance Allen
Technical Officer
Uni of Auckland
Psych Dept
New Zealand
_____________________________

1999\10\18@163653 by jamesp

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Lance,

I second you motion.  I prefer assembly over 'C'.  I own a 'C'
compiler, but I have used it only once or twice.  Also, with
regard to PIC assembly, you only have 35 or 36 instructions to
contend with, so learning assembly for the PIC is very simple.
The first time I worked with a PIC was several years ago, and
I had no experience with them before.  I wrote an application
in assembly, tested the logic with the simulator, burned the
code into the part, plugged it into the circuit, powered it up,
and it WORKED the way it was intended to work.  The whole
process took less than 8 hours.  And that includes loading the
software onto my computer, and reading a few line of the manual
that came with the assembler (MPASM).  So, in my opinion, you
can't go wrong by learning assembly, and it is relatively easy
to do.  Once you get used to it, you probably won't want to
mess with the higher level languages.  But, to each his own.
I'm not condemning high level languages.  I just prefer to use
Assembly.  Good luck in your learning process.

                                       Regards,

                                         Jim


{Quote hidden}

1999\10\18@182906 by Mark Willis

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TOM VILLANI wrote:
>
> Hello list,
> I've just recently found out about PIC devices- I'm building an
> altimeter for high power rocketry and I was trying to understand the
> basics of PIC chips.
> I'm using the PIC16C711 chip
> How does one write the code-- what 'tools' are required ?  is the code
> C++ ?
> What is the format of the code when 'burning' the on board PROM? i.e.
> what do I select on my PROM burner ? is it binary, or hex or..?
> TIA
> Tom [MSEE but PIC ignorant]

Hi, Tom.

You can write in any/all of C, Pascal, JAL, Assembler (Parallax or
Microchip - your choice), among other choices.

One good web page of many on where to find Demo/free languages, see:
 http://www.dontronics.com/piclinks.html
 http://www.new-elect.com/links.htm
 http://www.picnpoke.com/ (Might take a look at his simulators etc.)

You can get free demo's of C compilers off the web, also many
assemblers, and various shareware/retail compilers etc.  I wouldn't say
there's much done in C++ on PICs, not really enough resources (stack
space esp.) for OOP, for certain *I* haven't tried it <G>  I don't know
of a C++ compiler for the PIC, haven't looked though.

 Mark

1999\10\18@205807 by Mark Willis
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Bruce Holmen wrote:
> <snipped>
> Tom,
>
> The file used to "burn" the PIC is in hex format.  A PIC programmer is
> used rather than an EPROM burner.  I have been using the EPIC Plus
> Pocket Programmer http://www.melabs.com/mel/home.htm along with their
> In-Circuit Programming Adapter.
>
> This adapter has a relay that switches my 16F84 into my target circuit
> or into the programmer.  This really speeds up the task of checking out
> modifications to your program.
>
> Bruce Holmen

Some EPRom programmers will burn PIC chips, though (Both my Needhams
EMP-10 and EMP-20 will program some, and most all, respectively, PIC
chips.)  I have to admit that I haven't used those for that yet (long
story; I like to be redundant & not wear out my tools, basically),
definitely possible, probably with other pricey EPRom burners, as well.
Though you may have to work to figure out how to do it, it's definitely
possible.

 Mark

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