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PICList Thread
'Need help on an OMRON Optical Sensor, EE-SY310'
1998\10\14@131930 by Lauren cousins

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Gentlemen and Ladies,

       I have purchased an OMRON OPTICAL SENSOR, EE-SY310, that is used in
reflection counting applications.  However, I do not know the pinouts.  Two
diodes, should be pretty simple, right.  However, one end of the package has
three leads and the other has two leads.  I believe the LED has the three
leads and the detector has the two leads.  But, I'm not sure.  Does anyone
have the pinout on this device?  I'm using is as sensor for a compass intended
for use by the blind.  The sensor will be placed on top of a conventional
compass and the output will be sent through a couple of comparators to a PIC
controller for direction determination.

Thanks in advance,

Lauren

1998\10\14@134238 by Peter Schultz

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Hi,
It is one diode for generating the light ( two leg easy to figure out just
use a battery and a 1k resistor if Your drop will be between 1.8 and 2.5
volts that is Your correct polarity )
The other side is a photo transistor ( three legs ) With a diode checking
multimeter You can figure out which is the base.
After it is easy just measure the forward drop on BE and BC diode . The
higher reading going to be the emitter.
Hope it helps,
PeterS

1998\10\14@140915 by Peter L. Peres

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It may be a phototransistor, or it may be a chip with a preamplifier and
digital output, or there may be 2 phototransistors for encoder wheels. The
LED is almost certainly the 2 leads.

To find out, you can try to use a 5V supply and 2 pcs. 1K resistors, but
first make the LED work by determining its polarity and supplying it
through a resistor with 10-15 mA.

Then, hook up the two 1K's each to supply +5V and one wire to supply GND
and make a table with 6 read-outs on the 3 pins with the light on, and 6
more with the light off. Each read-out notes two values: Volts vs. GND on
each pin of the PHD, that is not grounded.

If you can't make sense of the read-out table, please share it with us, as
we might ;)

Peter

PS: By far the easiest way is to find the data sheet ;)

1998\10\14@151025 by Lauren cousins

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Peter,

   Thanks for the guidance, I'll give it a try!

Lauren

1998\10\14@151851 by Lauren cousins

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Peter,

   I do find it confusing but I'll make up the table and see what I can
learn.  I agree the best way is to get a data sheet but that will take me
about a week and I am impatient.  Besides this way I might learn something.

Thanks for your help.

Lauren

1998\10\14@161254 by Peter L. Peres

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Lauren,

 You are looking for a line in the 2nd table (IR light off) that relates
to the same line in the 1st table (IR light on) like this:

(Note: ~ means light off, nothing means on, figures are volts measured,
<5 == less than 5V e.g. 4.9V or lower)

1. For two phototransistors:
~ 5 5
 <5 <5

2. For a chip-amplified sensor:
~ 5 5
 5 0

or (inverted output):

~ 5 0
 5 5

 For a BCE phototransistor (rather rare for this type of app), use only
ONE 1K resistor and GND wire and 2 tables of 3 lines, one reading per
line each. You are looking for an entry like:

~ 5
 <5

 You'll get two of these, one stronger than the other (i.e. <5 is lower
than <5 of the other reading). When you get the stronger one you are
reading the CE junction. You still need to determine the polarity (PNP or
NPN). Ask when you get that far ;)

 You can accelerate all measurements by discarding any setting where you
read 0.4..0.6 V on the diode scale between any 2 pins for the 3-wire
method. Cancel that line in both tables and proceed.

I enjoy this kind of remote-hacking ;),

Peter

PS: This method will not correctly determine a double pht with common
collectors (NPNs) but these are very rare so...

1998\10\14@162752 by cousens

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Lauren cousins wrote:
>
> Gentlemen and Ladies,
>
>         I have purchased an OMRON OPTICAL SENSOR, EE-SY310, that is used in
> reflection counting applications.  However, I do not know the pinouts.  Two
> diodes, should be pretty simple, right.  However, one end of the package has
> three leads and the other has two leads.  I believe the LED has the three
> leads and the detector has the two leads.

The sender has the two wires and the receiver has three

Most of the commercial sensors are designed to operate on 24V dc
unstabilised
supply

Sometimes these are the colours (I did say sometimes)
blue  -
brown or red +
white or black output


--
Peter Cousens
email: spam_OUTcousensTakeThisOuTspamher.forthnet.gr  phone: + 3081 380534
snailmail:  Folia, Agia Fotini, Karteros, Heraklion  Crete, Greece.

Is it true that they have, on the new version of windows
managed to increase the MTBF from 95 to 98 minutes ?
(That's why they called it 95)

1998\10\14@163619 by Peter Schultz

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Hi,
I admit I was wrong it has a built in amplifier. Finally I find the
datasheet.
Top view:
  ________
K|                | Vcc
 |           | Out
A|________| GND

Good Luck,
PeterS

1998\10\14@183933 by Lauren cousins

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Peter,

All right!  That's what I needed.  The pin out.  I don't think I would have
ever gotten it by measuring the resistance.  Thanks a million.  I appreciate
the time you took to look it up.

Lauren

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