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'My first PIC experience'
2000\01\18@102108 by James Paul

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My first PIC experience was to program a 16C84 to act as a
furnace controller used in manufacturing IC's.  When making
integrated circuits, one of the processes is DIFFUSION. What
this does is to heat the wafer and causes the dopant to diffuse
evenly and thouroughly throughout the lattice of the substrate,
usually Silicon.   Anyway, this controller had to monitor a
flame detector, signals from Mass Flow Controllers that were
used to control gas flow into the oven tubes, And a start
signal from the operator.  It also had to control 2 gas valves,
and an alarm signal.

I was given the assignment, and told to buy whatever I needed
to make a working controller.  I was given a budget of $3K.
In actuality, I only used about $70 - $80 of the budget.
I had NO experience with PIC's, but I did have some micro-
processor experience.   I downloaded the assembler and
simulator from a BBS (before the internet was a household
word - ~1990 or 1991).  I read the datasheet, wrote my source,
assembeled it, ran it through the simulator (several times),
until I thought it was ready, programmed the part, built a
prototype unit, connected it to a furnace stack, fired it
up and it worked exactly as it should have.  Many people were
impressed.  Not necessarily because I built the thing, or
because it worked right out of the hole, but mostly because of
the turnaround time.  At the time, I worked a 12 hour day
in a 3 day compressed workweek.  The time from when I got the
assignment until I had a working prototype was about 1 12 hour
shift.  The next day when I came in, I did the actual
connecting to the furnace, but the whole point is that the
project was done basically from start to finish in about 12
hours. And my point is PIC's are rather easy to learn and work
with.  With just a little effort and time spent reading and
learning the tools, code can be written, perfected, and a part
programmed in a short time.  And I think the key to having
bug free code, at least functionally, is to simulate your code
many times, to get an idea of the logic and to see if it is
correct.  Once this is done, the rest is easily accomplished.
At least that's been my experience.  I never did get to make
the LED blinker circuit.  I may do that now just for the fun
of it.

                                      Regards,

                                        Jim



On Tue, 18 January 2000, "Marion D. Kitchens" wrote:

{Quote hidden}

spam_OUTjimTakeThisOuTspamjpes.com

2000\01\18@125253 by Reginald Neale

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<x-flowed>Jim said:

> up and it worked exactly as it should have.  Many people were
> impressed.

  Shoot, I'm impressed and I wasn't even there!

{Quote hidden}

 programmed in a short time.

  Although mere mortals may take a little longer...

  Hey, congratulations, really. I wish it worked that way
  more often.

  Reg Neale

</x-flowed>

2000\01\18@153605 by M. Adam Davis

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Reginald Neale wrote:
>
> Jim said:
>
> > up and it worked exactly as it should have.  Many people were
> > impressed.
>
>    Hey, congratulations, really. I wish it worked that way
>    more often.
>
>    Reg Neale

I just wish I had the patience to sit and simulate the code rather than
program the part, test it, set it in the eraser and debug...  It would
probably save me some time, but the simulator just is *so* counter
intuitive!

-Adam

2000\01\18@162026 by Allan West

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Maybe someone else has heard of this but there was a program for the
Microchip sim that removes some of the mouse calls, or does something.  And
it was meant to be 5 times faster?  I'm going by poor memory here, sorry for
the fuzziness.

Allan

{Original Message removed}

2000\01\19@112945 by Dennis Gearon

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I used to be "program and go", but the control freak in me took over. I
like to KNOW that the code will at least put something out to the real
world before I put it into a part. That's why I use the simulator.

--
________________________________________________________________
Real friends are those who, when you feel you've made a fool of
yourself, don't feel you've done a permanent job.
________________________________________________________________
Dennis K. Gearon (Kegley)
Scientific Instrument Technician, School of EIT
Oregon Institute of Technology - One of USA's 100 Best College Buys
3201 Campus Drive
Klamath Falls, OR 97601
Voice   1-541-885-1563
FAX     1-541-885-1689
email   .....gearondKILLspamspam@spam@oit.edu
________________________________________________________________

2000\01\19@131459 by Oleg Sergin

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Hello Dennis,

Some things like button tinkling are very hard to see using pin
stimulus in simulator... :)

DG> I used to be "program and go", but the control freak in me took over. I
DG> like to KNOW that the code will at least put something out to the real
DG> world before I put it into a part. That's why I use the simulator.

--
Best regards,
Oleg                             serginspamKILLspamfcita.dn.ua

2000\01\20@075620 by paulb

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Allan West wrote:

> Maybe someone else has heard of this but there was a program for the
> Microchip sim that removes some of the mouse calls, or does something.
>  And it was meant to be 5 times faster?

 No, it "simulates" mouse calls.  It has been observed that the sim
runs that much faster if you diddle your mouse around (in the sim
window I think) while it runs.

 Some hideous bug in Windoze pseudo-time sharing.  Since this mouse-
diddling isn't really convenient, the program generates null events to
Win instead.
--
 Cheers,
       Paul B.

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