Searching \ for 'Making a ticking sound' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/io/audio.htm?key=sound
Search entire site for: 'Making a ticking sound'.

Truncated match.
PICList Thread
'Making a ticking sound'
2000\01\26@160318 by frmiller

flavicon
face
I have an application where I need to make a short ticking
sound, about 1 per second or so. It needs to be heard from
as far as 10' away, but not much louder. It would be really
nice if it was simple and within 5 volts. I screwed around
with a cheap speaker out of a PC, where I put it between 5V
and the collector of a PN2222, then switched the transistor
every second by toggling the pin on the PIC (16C73). It had
the right sound but wasn't loud enough. Does any one have a
device or circuit that work for this?

Ryan

2000\01\26@183019 by Wagner Lipnharski

flavicon
face
This is the first problem. You are not exciting correctly the speaker.

First of all, applying DC to a speaker will create just a small and
single air pushing, like a "click", not enough to generate a loud
signal, except if you have a large speaker with a large "air pump"
cone.  Small speakers works better by creating a constant air
oscillation.

Second, by applying 5V at one moment, makes the speaker cone move in one
direction, then applying "nothing" at next second, makes the speaker
cone just returns to its resting mechanical position, slowly by its own
"spring" action.  If you apply a single capacitor, resistor and two
transistors, you will have a nice Push-Pull configuration. By this way
you would push and pull the speaker cone to opposite directions every
time you switch levels...

Instead of just switching the port pin level, try to send a burst of
audible frequency, lets say switch the port pin state 50 times using a
pulse period of 0.5ms, it would generate a 1kHz tone during 25ms, fast
and pretty good.

Trying different pulse period and pulse quantity, you could find out a
loud setup.

 
                                   +5Vdc
                                     |
                                     |
                                    C
                         .---------B   NPN 2N2222
                         |          E
                         |           |           _____
                1kOhms   |           |   +       \   /
PIC port pin ----RRRR-----o           o----||----SPEAKER---.
                         |           |   100µF            |
                         |           |                    |
                         |          E   PNP 2N2907       gnd
                         '---------B        
                                    C
                                     |
                                     |
                                    gnd

Little more power?


               +5Vdc                +5Vdc
                 |                    |
                 |                    |
                 |                   C
                 R        .---------B   NPN 2N2222
             1   R        |          E
         kOhms   R        |           |           _____
                 |        |           |   +       \   /
                 |        |           o----||----SPEAKER---.
                 o--------o           |   100µF            |
                 |        |           |                    |
PIC    5kOhms    C         |          E   PNP 2N2907       gnd
Port ---RRRR----B          '---------B        
Pin              E                    C
                 | NPN 2N2222        |
                 |                   |
                gnd                 gnd


There are the inverted possibility, using the PNP to +5V, and the NPN to
ground, but it requires more components, and you don't need it now.

Wagner



Ryan Miller wrote:    
{Quote hidden}

2000\01\26@211631 by Dan Creagan

flavicon
face
Get a piezo buzzer (not speaker) from Radio Shack.  Operates off of 5 volts
and 20 ma.  Fairly loud (the buzzer).  I use it as a low battery warning on
my robots.

Dan

{Quote hidden}

2000\01\27@003928 by Roland Andrag

flavicon
face
I have with success (after it was suggested on the Piclist) connected a
piezo device between two port pins to get an effective 10 V swing.

RB0 -----piezo speaker------RB1

Start off with RB0 = 0 V, RB1 = 5 V. Now switch them to RB0 = 5 V, RB1 = 0.
Do this about 4000 times a second for a nice noise.  A good idea is to play
around with the frequency - most piezo speakers have a narrow frequency band
in which they are really loud.

I cannot remember what the verdict was on whether it is necessary to include
series resistors...

Cheers
Roland


{Original Message removed}

2000\01\27@015937 by Dr. Imre Bartfai

flavicon
face
Hi,
as a short idea:
after toggling the PIN you should re-toggle it after ... say 1 msec. IMHO
it enhances the effect and will not load the speaker and the transistor
unnecessary.

Regards,
Imre


On Wed, 26 Jan 2000, Ryan Miller wrote:

{Quote hidden}

2000\01\28@110949 by Lawrence Lile

flavicon
face
part 0 1347 bytes content-type:application/octet-stream;They are designed to drive a 17mm diameter piezo speaker connected directly
to a port pin.  You can get more volume if you drive the speaker through a
2n2222 and a higher voltage .

Don't use these blindly, make sure you filter out the extraneous statements
because they are lifted directly out of one of my applications.
Good luck!

-- Lawrence Lile


{Original Message removed}

2000\01\28@143617 by Don McKenzie

flavicon
face
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Ryan Miller <spam_OUTfrmillerTakeThisOuTspamPLIX.COM>
> To: .....PICLISTKILLspamspam@spam@MITVMA.MIT.EDU <PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
> Date: Wednesday, January 26, 2000 3:03 PM
> Subject: Making a ticking sound
>
> >I have an application where I need to make a short ticking
> >sound, about 1 per second or so. It needs to be heard from
> >as far as 10' away, but not much louder.

Need Sounds from PICmicros?

; SOUND port, pin, frequency, duration
; Generates squarewave tones (notes) of the specified frequency and
; duration. This demonstration program shows how to use lookup tables to
; play tunes or effects from data stored in program memory.

found at:
http://www.dontronics.com/convert2.html#sound

Basic Stamp Compatible PIC Source Book/Disk On-Line Version Free!
Now converted to MicroChip Code, still available in Parallax Code.

A collection of ready-to-use assembly language routines
based on the instruction set of the BASIC Stamp ¨ single-board
computer by Scott Edwards Electronics.
                                               
Includes useful schematics.
For MicroChip code:
http://www.dontronics.com/convert.html
For Parallax code:
http://www.dontronics.com/see.html

Don McKenzie    .....donKILLspamspam.....dontronics.com      http://www.dontronics.com

World's Largest Range of Atmel/AVR and  PICmicro Hardware and  Software.
Free Basic Compiler and Programmer http://www.dontronics.com/runavr.html

2000\01\28@195708 by J Nagy

flavicon
face
Roland Andrag wrote:
>
>I have with success (after it was suggested on the Piclist) connected a
>piezo device between two port pins to get an effective 10 V swing.
>
>RB0 -----piezo speaker------RB1
>
>Start off with RB0 = 0 V, RB1 = 5 V. Now switch them to RB0 = 5 V, RB1 = 0.
>Do this about 4000 times a second for a nice noise.  A good idea is to play
>around with the frequency - most piezo speakers have a narrow frequency band
>in which they are really loud.
>
>I cannot remember what the verdict was on whether it is necessary to include
>series resistors...
>

Roland:
       For a 'purer tone' you might want to try pulsing your piezo with a
duty cycle of 2/3 (ie +ve for 2t, off for t, -ve for 2t and off for t). I
believe if you do a Fourier analysis of this waveform, you'll find there
are no 3rd and 9th harmonics, etc.(as well as no even ones due to the
symmetry) giving you a cleaner sine wave than you would have with the 50%
square wave that you're proposing.
       For experimental use, you'd likely get away with no series
resistor, but I wouldn't do it. The piezo element is one big capacitor that
you're charging/discharging so to limit the current add some resistance.
~1K is a good ballpark to try.




       Jim Nagy
       Elm Electronics
 ICs for Experimenters
http://www.elmelectronics.com/

2000\01\30@114023 by Tom Mariner

flavicon
face
A tick (or click) is a short burst of high frequency audible tone. Play
around with the duration and frequency until it gives you the effect you
want.

Tom Mariner

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Ryan Miller <EraseMEfrmillerspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTPLIX.COM>
> To: PICLISTspamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU <@spam@PICLISTKILLspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
> Date: Wednesday, January 26, 2000 3:03 PM
> Subject: Making a ticking sound
>
> >I have an application where I need to make a short ticking
> >sound, about 1 per second or so. It needs to be heard from
> >as far as 10' away, but not much louder.

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2000 , 2001 only
- Today
- New search...