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PICList Thread
'Magnetic card reader.'
1997\08\19@030559 by Poul Bundgaard

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Hello PIClisters.

I am in the planning phase of designing a system for vehicle
control.
The system is supposed to use a swipe reader for magnetic cards.
I imagine using a 16F84 and a serial EEPROM to do the task,
and I wonder if someone already has done card-reading with a
PIC, where I can be allowed to look how it is - or can be - done.
If not a PIC, then a hint towards code for another microcontroller
would be greatly appreciated.



Med venlig hilsen / Best regards

OMNITEC
v.Poul Bundgaard          Phone +45 86 65 13 92
Pr¾stev¾nget 4,           Fax.  +45 86 65 13 92
R¿dding                         Mob.  +45 21 45 54 26        
8830 Tjele
Danmark.          E-mail: spam_OUTp_bundgaardTakeThisOuTspamvip.cybercity.dk

1997\08\19@074727 by Glenn Johansson

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part 0 936 bytes
Regards,
Glenn
http://www.zpace.base.org/

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From:   Poul Bundgaard[SMTP:.....p_bundgaardKILLspamspam@spam@VIP.CYBERCITY.DK]
Sent:    den 19 August 1997 8:44 AM
To:     PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject:        Magnetic card reader.

Hello PIClisters.

I am in the planning phase of designing a system for vehicle
control.
The system is supposed to use a swipe reader for magnetic cards.
I imagine using a 16F84 and a serial EEPROM to do the task,
and I wonder if someone already has done card-reading with a
PIC, where I can be allowed to look how it is - or can be - done.
If not a PIC, then a hint towards code for another microcontroller
would be greatly appreciated.



Med venlig hilsen / Best regards

OMNITEC
v.Poul Bundgaard          Phone +45 86 65 13 92
Pr¾stev¾nget 4,           Fax.  +45 86 65 13 92
R¿dding                         Mob.  +45 21 45 54 26        
8830 Tjele
Danmark.          E-mail: .....p_bundgaardKILLspamspam.....vip.cybercity.dk


1997\08\19@104131 by KcW

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part 0 960 bytes
head>

I agree. Magnetic cards are old hat. Standalone smart card reader/writers can be built very inexpensively (read <$20 in pats) and the ISO7815 cards are about a buck in small quantities with gobs of room for data. As well, the cards can be made secure, reducing the need for PIC based algorithms.

Regards,
KcW
kcw.kcwcc@sympatico.ca

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From: Glenn Johansson <glenn@WRITEME.COM>
To: PICLIST@MITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: Re: Magnetic card reader.
Date: Tuesday, August 19, 1997 5:20 AM

Have you considered a system with PIC1684-based smartcards?

Regards,
Glenn
http://www.zpace.base.org/


1997\08\20@132551 by ame

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    Hi,

    I built a magnetic card reader using a PIC'84.  It was not hard, all
    you need is the ISO spec for the data encoding, and the appropriate
    hardware (a card reader with TTL output).  I don't have the code with
    me anymore, but it would be easy to rewrite.  The biggest problem is
    deciding whether to cache the whole data track, or decode it on the
    fly.

    I do not agree that magnetic cards are old hat.  Rather, I would say
    they are proven technology.  With the plethora of 'standards' for
    Smart Cards I would steer clear of them for a while.  Once a market
    leader for smart cards emerges is the hobbyist going to be *allowed*
    or able to tinker with them?

    I could use a magstripe reader in a project and activate it with my
    credit card if I chose so to do.

    I think Digi-Key list a Panasonic reader assembly, and I have
    purchased many parts from American Magnetics Corporation, both basic
    assemblies and complete reader systems.  They have a crappy web page
    at http://www.amagaccess.com/

    Stick to track 2 decoding.  You get 32 (I think) 4bit digits, which
    you can squeeze into 16 bytes.  Track 1 and 3 are alphanumeric, with a
    greater capacity, which requires more effort to decode.

    Hope this helps.

    Andy #2


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1997\08\21@194633 by blunn

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Bob Lunn
08/22/97 09:48 AM


> I do not agree that magnetic cards are old hat.
> Rather, I would say they are proven technology.

Latest estimate I've seen is 2 billion magnetic swipe
cards in current use world wide.

Hardly 'old hat'.  Most definitely 'proven'.

___Bob

1997\08\22@110327 by KcW

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Gentlemen, it's a matter of price versus capabilities. I recently put
together an ISO7816 reader/writer for less than $20. When's the last time
you built a magnetic card reader/writer. The cards are more expensive sure,
but look what you get - intelligence on a card - built in security measures
- up to 4K of storage space. Further, smart cards have been in use in
Europe and Japan for years. There are millions of people carrying them
around. In North America, we simply sorely lag behind in this matter. If
mag stripe wasn't dying as a technology, why is VISA, MC, AMEX and the rest
of the big card users all moving toward using smart card based debit
systems? Have you ever heard of Mondex? They have a smart card based test
system in place in Guelph Ontario using smart card based commerce. As well,
a lot of debit type systems i.e university/hospital food service is moving
to smart cards. I'm sorry, but in light of these developments and the ease
with which a smart card can be interfaced, mag cards are, indeed, old hat.

Regards and best wishes to all,
KcW

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{Quote hidden}

1997\08\23@050156 by rlunn

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> Gentlemen, it's a matter of price versus capabilities. I recently put
> together an ISO7816 reader/writer for less than $20. When's the last time
> you built a magnetic card reader/writer. The cards are more expensive sure,
> but look what you get - intelligence on a card - built in security measures
> - up to 4K of storage space. Further, smart cards have been in use in
> Europe and Japan for years. There are millions of people carrying them
> around. In North America, we simply sorely lag behind in this matter. If
> mag stripe wasn't dying as a technology, why is VISA, MC, AMEX and the rest
> of the big card users all moving toward using smart card based debit
> systems? Have you ever heard of Mondex? They have a smart card based test
> system in place in Guelph Ontario using smart card based commerce. As well,
> a lot of debit type systems i.e university/hospital food service is moving
> to smart cards. I'm sorry, but in light of these developments and the ease
> with which a smart card can be interfaced, mag cards are, indeed, old hat.

       Have I heard of Mondex?  <chortle>  Sir, the company for which I'm
       currently working has one of the largest installed bases of smart
       card capable POS terminals in the world.

       The business case for smartcards in regard to credit, debit, and
       stored value transactions is non-existant.

       The only application that looks like it's going to save smartcards
       from going the way of DDC's is their ability to store certificates
       (transaction authorisation keys/customer identification keys).

___Bob

1997\08\23@065540 by mikesmith_oz

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On 23 Aug 97 at 17:00, Robert Lunn wrote:

>
>         Have I heard of Mondex?  <chortle>  Sir, the company for

<sigh>  I'll play sucker.  Who or what are Mondex?

>         which I'm currently working has one of the largest installed
>         bases of smart card capable POS terminals in the world.
>
>         The business case for smartcards in regard to credit, debit,
>         and stored value transactions is non-existant.

Doesn't that place your job in some jeopardy, then?

>
>         The only application that looks like it's going to save
>         smartcards from going the way of DDC's is their ability to
>         store certificates (transaction authorisation keys/customer
>         identification keys).
>
What are the Telstra smartcards going to be then?  They've been
advertising them for use in metropolitan public phones, with
extensions to use in public transport, parking machines, vending
machines etc.  Telstra don't normally take out large advertising on
things that aren't ready to market...
MikeS
<@spam@mikesmith_ozKILLspamspamrelaymail.net>

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