Searching \ for 'Lookup Tables: Sine Converter' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/method/math.htm?key=sine
Search entire site for: 'Lookup Tables: Sine Converter'.

Truncated match.
PICList Thread
'Lookup Tables: Sine Converter'
2000\02\01@165822 by Thomas McGahee

flavicon
face
Very often a lookup table or set of lookup tables is the simplest
solution. By using a little creativity you can greatly reduce the
size lookup table needed.

Let's say you want to find the Sine of x. First off,
the sine of x only has to be calculated or stored for the first
90 degrees. In this quadrant the value ranges from 0 to 1. In the
second quadrant (90 to 180) the value ranges from 1 to 0. In this
second quadrant you can get the equivalent 1st quadrant value
by using 180-x. For example, 180-110=70, so sin(110)=sin(70).
In the 3rd quadrant (180 to 270) the value ranges from 0 to -1.
In the 3rd quadrant sin(x)=-sin(x-180). In the 4th quadrant
(270 to 360) the value ranges from -1 to 0. In the 4th quadrant
Sin(x)=-sin(360-x).

The implication of this is that you can use a single table that
covers from 0 to 90 degrees. You test the incoming x value and
branch to one of four routines, based on the quadrant to which
x belongs. Each subroutine would then convert x to the proper
value, look up the value in the table, and set a posneg indicator
that will tell us whether the last value converted is considered
a positive or negative value. (The returned value is in positive
format, and the posneg flag tells us whether it is really positive
or negative).

The lookup table can have the answer stored in either binary or
packed decimal format. Which form you use depends on what you
are going to do with the answer. If you are going to display the
answer on an LCD, then use packed decimal format. If you are
going to perform further math on the value, then binary might
be best. If the math perfomed is something simple like multiply
the value by some constant, then you can even store the table
values so that you have the value multiplied by the constant
already in the table.

In packed decimal format you use the upper 4 bits to store one
digit, and the lower 4 bits to store another digit. Two bytes
will thus get you 4 decimal digits. You can thus store values
from .0000 to .9999

You could get 6 digit accuracy if you use 3 bytes of storage per
value. Let's assume you want 6 digits of accuracy and a resolution
of .5 degrees. There are 90 degrees times 2 to give us .5 degree
resolution, times 3 bytes of storage. 90x2x3=540 bytes of storage.

A lookup table is limited to a maximum size of 256. This is due to the
fact that the addressing mechanism is limited to a one byte value.
The way you can get around this limitation is to use three jump
tables each having a length of 180. Let's call these tablehigh,
tablemiddle, and tablelow. You would load the tables with the
required data:

                                   SINE
Angle In Degrees | Offset Address | VALUE | High | Middle | Low
----------------------------------------------------------------
 0.0            | 0              |.000000| 00   | 00     | 00
 0.5            | 1              |.008727| 00   | 87     | 27
 1.0            | 2              |.017452| 01   | 74     | 52
 1.5            | 3              |.026177| 02   | 61     | 77
etcetera        | etcetera       | etc.  | etc. | etc.   | etc.
etcetera        | etcetera       | etc.  | etc. | etc.   | etc.
89.5            | 179            |.999962| 99   | 99     | 62
90.0            | 180            |.999999| 99   | 99     | 99
----------------------------------------------------------------

So let's say you feed the value 179 degrees in to the Sine Converter.
First the Sine Converter would determine that 179 is in the second
quadrant because it is between 90 and 180 degrees. The SecondQuadrant
converter would set the posneg flag to "1" to indicate a positive
polarity for the answer. Then 180-179=1. We multiply this by 2
to convert the equivalent angle into an Offset Address of 2.

The SecondQuadrant routine now jumps to the TableDecode routine.
The Offset Address now points to the proper table element.
We call a subroutine that looks at posneg and outputs either
a + or a - symbol to indicate polarity. It also prints the decimal
point (preceded by a "0" if desired). We access tablehigh
and get back 0x01. We call a subroutine that sends "01" to
the LCD. We access tablemiddle and get back 0x74. We call a
subroutine that sends "74" to the LCD. We access tablelow and
get back 0x52. We call a subroutine that sends "52" to the LCD.

The above assumes you want the sine value displayed. If you instead
want the sine value so it can be used with more math processing,
then store the value in binary. Here is a simple method for generating
the binary equivalents of numbers such as .017452:

Bigger than or equal to 1/2?      No .0
Bigger than or equal to 1/4?      No .00
Bigger than or equal to 1/8?      No .000
Bigger than or equal to 1/16?     No .0000
Bigger than or equal to 1/32?     No .00000
Bigger than or equal to 1/64?    Yes .000001
.017452-.015625=.001827
Bigger than or equal to 1/128?    No .0000010
Bigger than or equal to 1/256?    No .00000100 (just finished high byte)
Bigger than or equal to 1/512?    No .00000100 0 (we just began middle)
Bigger than or equal to 1/1024?  Yes .00000100 01
.001827-.0009765625=.0008504375
Bigger than or equal to 1/2048?  Yes .00000100 011
.0008504375-.00048828125=.00036215625
Bigger than or equal to 1/4096?  Yes .00000100 0111
.00036215625-.000244140625=.000118015625
Bigger than or equal to 1/8192?   No .00000100 01110
Continue this process until you have all 24 bits converted.

Yes, you are right, this is a regular bun-buster of a thing to have to
do for 180 values (to get 0 to 90 degrees in .5 degree increments).
Only a fool would attempt to build such a table manually. Instead,
write a simple program on your PC in BASIC, or C, or FOXPRO,
or whatever language you like. Then use the program to compile
the table values for you. Hint: the output is a "0" for No, and
a "1" for Yes. When the answer is Yes you subtract and now use
the result as your value to compare against.

I use FOXPRO to do all this nitty gritty boring stuff, and I
have it actually produce three ASCII files that make up the 3 tables of
RETLW instructions (High, Middle, and Low). I Then append these
files into my assembler at the proper places. Each line contains
something like this:
  RETLW 00110101b       where the "b" means that the number is in binary.

Well, I would write some more, but I have some other things to get to
right now. I hope that someone out there finds this useful. Is there
any great desire out there for a series of tutorials on topics like
binary addition, subtraction, division, multiplication, etc.? I could
probably also write some stuff on interrupt routines and various other
topics that are oriented towards the PIC way of doing things.

I am willing to write some tutorial type stuff if it is useful to some
and not obnoxious to those who are already experts.

I should warn you though that I am more inclined to write about
the HOW and WHY aspects and leave a complete and full program
listing to the user. It is not just a matter of time, but my mindset
as an educator. I am willing to teach and explain and show someone
how to go about something. I usually won't hand my students
a complete program to accomplish the task, because that is what
I want *them* to learn how to do. My objective is to educate, not
to be a source of finished product so that the student has nothing
to do. I believe we learn by doing more than any other way.


Fr. Tom McGahee




{Original Message removed}

2000\02\04@165913 by andy howard

flavicon
face
From: "Thomas McGahee" <spam_OUTtom_mcgaheeTakeThisOuTspamSIGMAIS.COM>
Subject: Lookup Tables: Sine Converter


> Very often a lookup table or set of lookup tables is the simplest
> solution. By using a little creativity you can greatly reduce the
> size lookup table needed.

<Interesting and pleasantly discursive discussion snipped>

> I am willing to write some tutorial type stuff if it is useful to some
> and not obnoxious to those who are already experts.

Do please.  Although familiar with the nuts'n'bolts of PICs and able to
knock up code to do all the basics, when I see some of the elegant
and/or concise code examples posted here I'm all to aware that there's a
big gap in my meagre engineer's coding skills when it comes to
programming philosophies, strategy etc.  The science of programming as
it were, rather than the engineering.


{Quote hidden}

2000\02\04@172533 by andy howard

flavicon
face
Original Message From: "Thomas McGahee" <.....tom_mcgaheeKILLspamspam@spam@SIGMAIS.COM>
Subject: Lookup Tables: Sine Converter

> Very often a lookup table or set of lookup tables is the simplest
> solution. By using a little creativity you can greatly reduce the
> size lookup table needed.

<Interesting and pleasantly discursive discussion snipped>

> I am willing to write some tutorial type stuff if it is useful to some
> and not obnoxious to those who are already experts.

Do please!  Though familiar with the nuts'n'bolts of PICs and able to
knock up code to do all the basics, when I see some of the elegant
and/or concise code examples posted by some people here I'm all too
aware that there's a big gap in my meagre, self-taught engineer's coding
knowlege when it comes to programming philosophies, strategy etc.


> I should warn you though that I am more inclined to write about
> the HOW and WHY aspects and leave a complete and full program
> listing to the user. It is not just a matter of time, but my mindset
> as an educator.

The science of programming as it were, rather than the engineering.
And maybe a touch of art too... Something many of the PIC books I've
seen find too little space for, IMHO.


> I am willing to teach and explain and show someone
> how to go about something. I usually won't hand my students
> a complete program to accomplish the task, because that is what
> I want *them* to learn how to do. My objective is to educate, not
> to be a source of finished product so that the student has nothing
> to do. I believe we learn by doing more than any other way.


They'll make an excellent learning resource as a website or ebook too.







.

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2000 , 2001 only
- Today
- New search...