Searching \ for 'Is there a problem ... [OT]' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/index.htm?key=
Search entire site for: 'Is there a problem ... [OT]'.

Truncated match.
PICList Thread
'Is there a problem ... [OT]'
1997\10\01@102213 by Andrew G Williams

picon face
Martin R. Green wrote:

>we have just gotten (God, I hate that word) ....

Move to Britain then - we never use it. :-)

It's included in the MSWorks 'American English' spelling checker, but not in
the 'British English' one. That recommends replacing it with 'rotten' !!

If you dislike it, why not just say "become"? Same number of syllables and
letters, and it's more general too.


Andy.

1997\10\01@104250 by Martin R. Green

picon face
Actually, I am a transplanted Brit, I came to Canada (with my parents, of
course) when I was 8 years old.  There are many phrases and pronunciations
here that drive me crazy, but since I am just about to turn 40, some of
them have crept into my vocabulary thru exposure.

My mother tells me that in school in England, she was taught never to use
got, since there is always a better word to use instead, i.e. received,
became, was, etc.  Here in NA, got and gotten are now a de-facto part of
the general vocabulary, especially in the US, hence the inclusion in the
American English dictionary.

In my original post, I was bemoaning the gradual creepage of bad grammar
into my "pure" English vocabulary (as if there is any such thing, try
talking to 10 randomly selected people in London).

TTFN - Martin R. Green
spam_OUTelimarTakeThisOuTspambigfoot.com

----------
From:   Andrew G Williams[SMTP:.....AGW01KILLspamspam@spam@AOL.COM]
Sent:   Wednesday, October 01, 1997 10:20 AM
To:     PICLISTspamKILLspammitvma.mit.edu
Subject:        Re: Is there a problem ... [OT]

Martin R. Green wrote:

>we have just gotten (God, I hate that word) ....

Move to Britain then - we never use it. :-)

It's included in the MSWorks 'American English' spelling checker, but not
in
the 'British English' one. That recommends replacing it with 'rotten' !!

If you dislike it, why not just say "become"? Same number of syllables and
letters, and it's more general too.


Andy.

1997\10\03@145900 by Andy Kunz

flavicon
face
At 10:34 AM 10/1/97 -0400, you wrote:
>Actually, I am a transplanted Brit, I came to Canada (with my parents, of
>course) when I was 8 years old.  There are many phrases and pronunciations
>here that drive me crazy, but since I am just about to turn 40, some of
>them have crept into my vocabulary thru exposure.

So you've gotten used to how we talk, EH?

<VBG>

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz - Montana Design - 409 S 6th St - Phillipsburg, NJ 08865
         Hardware & Software for Industry & R/C Hobbies
       "Go fast, turn right, and keep the wet side down!"
==================================================================

1997\10\03@161101 by Matt Bonner

flavicon
face
Andy Kunz wrote:
>
> At 10:34 AM 10/1/97 -0400, you wrote:
> >Actually, I am a transplanted Brit, I came to Canada (with my parents, of
> >course) when I was 8 years old.  There are many phrases and pronunciations
> >here that drive me crazy, but since I am just about to turn 40, some of
> >them have crept into my vocabulary thru exposure.
>
> So you've gotten used to how we talk, EH?
>
It's nice to see that y'all can speak Canajun. :-O
--Matt

1997\10\03@222103 by Ram Krishnan

flavicon
face
Yes,  "pure" english is probably dead, and not only in the U.S. -- after
listening to several  distinguished radio & tv personalities here in
america pronounce the word "accept" as "except",  I tuned to the BBC and
listened in,  and found to my horror that the word was being enunciated in
the same way!  But I suppose that's how languages evolve.

1997\10\04@022502 by Mike Smith

flavicon
face
-----Original Message-----
From: Ram Krishnan <.....krishKILLspamspam.....MEGSINET.NET>
To: EraseMEPICLISTspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTMITVMA.MIT.EDU <PICLISTspamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Date: Saturday, 4 October 1997 11:52
Subject: Re: Is there a problem ... [OT]


>Yes,  "pure" english is probably dead, and not only in the U.S. -- after
>listening to several  distinguished radio & tv personalities here in
>america pronounce the word "accept" as "except",  I tuned to the BBC and
>listened in,  and found to my horror that the word was being enunciated in
>the same way!  But I suppose that's how languages evolve.



Or devolve.  I heard a theory, that suggested we would all end up talking
like Kiwi's, given current trends.  (Something to do with english having a
predominance of lazy vowel sounds)

1997\10\04@190259 by Andy Kunz

flavicon
face
>Or devolve.  I heard a theory, that suggested we would all end up talking
>like Kiwi's, given current trends.  (Something to do with english having a
>predominance of lazy vowel sounds)

As long as that's the __ONLY__ thing we do like Kiwis,...  <G>

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz - Montana Design - 409 S 6th St - Phillipsburg, NJ 08865
         Hardware & Software for Industry & R/C Hobbies
       "Go fast, turn right, and keep the wet side down!"
==================================================================

1997\10\05@052904 by Steve Baldwin

flavicon
face
> As long as that's the __ONLY__ thing we do like Kiwis,...  <G>
>
> Andy

AHEM !!  :-)

Steve.
(calling from Godzone)

======================================================
 Very funny Scotty.  Now beam down my clothes.
======================================================
Steve Baldwin                Electronic Product Design
TLA Microsystems Ltd         Microcontroller Specialists
PO Box 15-680                email: @spam@stevebKILLspamspamkcbbs.gen.nz
New Lynn, Auckland           ph  +64 9 820-2221
New Zealand                  fax +64 9 820-1929
======================================================

1997\10\06@004257 by tjaart

flavicon
face
Ram Krishnan wrote:
>
> Yes,  "pure" english is probably dead, and not only in the U.S. -- after
> listening to several  distinguished radio & tv personalities here in
> america pronounce the word "accept" as "except",  I tuned to the BBC and
> listened in,  and found to my horror that the word was being enunciated in
> the same way!  But I suppose that's how languages evolve.

It is interesting how English took thousands of years to evolve to where
it is (was?), but it took the Americans only a few decades to the point
where they 'got thru de nite'. Enough to give up on RP...

--
Friendly Regards

Tjaart van der Walt
KILLspamtjaartKILLspamspamwasp.co.za
_____________________________________________________________
| WASP International http://www.wasp.co.za/~tjaart/index.html |
|       R&D Engineer : GSM peripheral services development    |
|   Vehicle tracking | Telemetry systems | GSM data transfer  |
|    Voice : +27-(0)11-622-8686 | Fax : +27-(0)11-622-8973    |
|              WGS-84 : 26010.52'S 28006.19'E                 |
|_____________________________________________________________|

1997\10\06@005545 by William Chops Westfield
face picon face
   It is interesting how English took thousands of years to evolve to where
   it is (was?), but it took the Americans only a few decades to the point
   where they 'got thru de nite'. Enough to give up on RP...

Um.  Have you ever read any "old english"?  Machavelli in its original form
or somesuch?  Listened to someone who knows how read english with correct
x00 year old pronunciation?  I don't things have been changed any more or
faster by americans (or anyone else) in the last 200 years than it changed
in the 200 years before that (aside from new words and concepts, of course,
which seem to get generated at an ever increasing rate...)

BillW

1997\10\06@103531 by Andy Kunz

flavicon
face
>Um.  Have you ever read any "old english"?  Machavelli in its original form
>or somesuch?  Listened to someone who knows how read english with correct
>x00 year old pronunciation?  I don't things have been changed any more or
>faster by americans (or anyone else) in the last 200 years than it changed
>in the 200 years before that (aside from new words and concepts, of course,
>which seem to get generated at an ever increasing rate...)

Actually, the English language has stabilized over the past 200+ years, due
to several factors:

a) literacy has improved from near 0% to almost 100%.
b) a common, unifying document used by most English-speakers in their daily
life (anybody want to guess on what the document is????)
c) this same document was textbook material in most English-speaking
countries, and only since the mid-1960's has it fallen into disuse (and
simultaneously, English change has accelerated since then mostly due to
technology).

I expect the English language will see a period of great change for the
next 20-30 years, then stabilize again, due to increased international
communication.

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz - Montana Design - 409 S 6th St - Phillipsburg, NJ 08865
         Hardware & Software for Industry & R/C Hobbies
       "Go fast, turn right, and keep the wet side down!"
==================================================================

1997\10\08@111152 by Mike Smith

flavicon
face
-----Original Message-----
From: Andy Kunz <RemoveMEmontanaTakeThisOuTspamFAST.NET>
To: spamBeGonePICLISTspamBeGonespamMITVMA.MIT.EDU <TakeThisOuTPICLISTEraseMEspamspam_OUTMITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Date: Tuesday, 7 October 1997 0:07
Subject: Re: Is there a problem ... [OT]


>>Um.  Have you ever read any "old english"?  Machavelli in its original
form
>>or somesuch?  Listened to someone who knows how read english with correct
>>x00 year old pronunciation?  I don't things have been changed any more or
>>faster by americans (or anyone else) in the last 200 years than it changed
>>in the 200 years before that (aside from new words and concepts, of
course,
>>which seem to get generated at an ever increasing rate...)
>
>Actually, the English language has stabilized over the past 200+ years, due
>to several factors:
>
>a) literacy has improved from near 0% to almost 100%.


Hollow laugh.  Define "almost 100%"

>b) a common, unifying document used by most English-speakers in their daily
>life (anybody want to guess on what the document is????)

given (c) I might be inclined to guess at the Bible.  These days it might be
a phonebook.

>c) this same document was textbook material in most English-speaking
>countries, and only since the mid-1960's has it fallen into disuse (and
>simultaneously, English change has accelerated since then mostly due to
>technology).

Darn speelin' an gramma checkas!

>
>I expect the English language will see a period of great change for the
>next 20-30 years, then stabilize again, due to increased international
>communication.

Why stabilise? (or stabilize if you prefer).  A living language changes,
even if we can talk to Enzeder's with the same facility as we talk to each
other.

MikeS
<RemoveMEmikesmith_ozspamTakeThisOuTrelaymail.net>

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 1997 , 1998 only
- Today
- New search...