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PICList Thread
'Inclinometer'
1997\10\24@035503 by TONY NIXON 54964

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Someone not long back posted a web site for inclinometers. If that
someone is 'listening' can you email me the info again. Thanks.

Also, there is a PIC list archive somewhere. Can someone point me to
it. That may save me posting requests like this one.


Regards

Tony


Just when I thought I knew it all,
I learned that I didn't.

1997\10\24@071215 by Andy Kunz

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At 05:05 PM 10/24/97 +1000, you wrote:
>Someone not long back posted a web site for inclinometers. If that
>someone is 'listening' can you email me the info again. Thanks.

http://www.rcboats.com

YOu have to ask spam_OUTskipTakeThisOuTspamrcboats.com to get the actual transducer, or
you can just order a stock product which includes one with the circuitry.

Andy

==================================================================
Andy Kunz - Montana Design - 409 S 6th St - Phillipsburg, NJ 08865
         Hardware & Software for Industry & R/C Hobbies
       "Go fast, turn right, and keep the wet side down!"
==================================================================

1997\10\24@133203 by Ricardo Seixas

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At 17:05 24/10/97 +1000, Tony wrote:

>Someone not long back posted a web site for inclinometers. If that
>someone is 'listening' can you email me the info again. Thanks.


       Well, I'm not "that someone" but I also use Inclinometers :)
       US Digital make cheap encoders with shaft or without (Inclinometer),
I use the model T2-7200 (0.05 deg. of resolution in X4 mode).
       The unit is attached to a LS7166 (quadrature decoder / 24 bit up-down
counter) and a 16F84 reads the LS7166 counter and do all the necessary math.
       Their website is: http://www.usdigital.com
       Another maker is Lucas (don't remember the web site) their inclinometer
is capacitive with analog, serial or PWM output with a resolution of 0.001
deg.
       Hope this helps.

Ricardo Seixas.





{Quote hidden}

1997\10\25@174822 by Eric van Es

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www.428main.com/piclist/


TONY NIXON 54964 wrote:

{Quote hidden}

--
Eric van Es               | Cape Town, South Africa
.....vanesKILLspamspam@spam@ilink.nis.za | http://www.nis.za/~vanes
LOOKING FOR TEMPORARY / HOLIDAY ACCOMODATION?
http://www.nis.za/~vanes/accom.htm


'inclinometer'
1998\01\22@100103 by Michael S. Hagberg
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this link has a reference to an inclinometer project using pic code.

http://www.maxim-ic.com/othersoftware.htm

it refences a sensor

Spectron: L-211
Fredricks: 0725-5006

does anyone know where i can get a few of these and how much they cost?

michael

1998\01\22@101928 by Bob Blick

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>it refences a sensor
>
>Spectron: L-211
>Fredricks: 0725-5006
>
>does anyone know where i can get a few of these and how much they cost?

Hi Michael,

I deal with both these companies on a weekly basis. The particular Spectron
sensor you refer to is a very expensive one meant for commercial aircraft.

Both companies make a dual-axis sensor that is more affordable and gives
two axes of output. $50 is about what it will cost in quantities of one.

Both companies sell direct, but Spectron has a rep(which is good, because
their phones are usually busy).

I'll get you some phone numbers when I get to work(they also advertise in
Sensors magazine, if you have a copy or maybe they have ads at
http://www.sensorsmag.com/

Cheers,

Bob

http://www.bobblick.com/

1998\01\22@114218 by Wayne Foletta

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Michael:

I needed a inclinometer sensor also. After research I found these
sensors are fairly expensive ($50 bucks and up - not a mainstream market
part).
You may want to build one yourself if you have the components in your
lab. The one I built is a variable resistance three terminal device.
Find or form a curved tube of glass or plastic about 1" - 2" long. The
curve radius depends on the angles you want to measure. Lay bare wires
straight in parallel along the tube length and attach to tube ends. Seal
one end of tube and fill 50% with an electrolyte (use tap water with few
grains of table salt). Seal tube and connect sensor wires to an ohmmeter
to test the sensor operation. For long term use the electrolyte must be
compatible with the sensor wires. Also the sensing current should be as
low as possible. Three or fours wires could be used for higher accuracy
in ratiometric mode.

See this site for a capacitive version:
http://www.euronet.nl/users/ragman/robot1.html

- Wayne Foletta
       BMI - Saratoga, CA

1998\01\22@115632 by Bob Blick

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Fredricks (215)938-4432
Spectron (516)582-8200
Sentech Measurements(Spectron no. Cal rep) (707)421-1959


BTW, these sensors are electrolytic and very sensitive to DC. Don't
measure them with an ohmmeter. Only an AC signal should be used on them,
or they will charge up like a battery, and eventually turn into junk.

-bob

1998\01\22@124323 by John Shreffler

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part 0 1272 bytes
Pardon the trailer junk.  I am a Microsoft victim

-----Original Message-----
From:   Wayne Foletta [SMTP:waynespamKILLspamELECTROTEK.COM]
Sent:   Thursday, January 22, 1998 11:40 AM
To:     .....PICLISTKILLspamspam.....MITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject:        Re: inclinometer

Michael:

I needed a inclinometer sensor also. After research I found these
sensors are fairly expensive ($50 bucks and up - not a mainstream market
part).
You may want to build one yourself if you have the components in your
lab. The one I built is a variable resistance three terminal device.
Find or form a curved tube of glass or plastic about 1" - 2" long. The
curve radius depends on the angles you want to measure. Lay bare wires
straight in parallel along the tube length and attach to tube ends. Seal
one end of tube and fill 50% with an electrolyte (use tap water with few
grains of table salt). Seal tube and connect sensor wires to an ohmmeter
to test the sensor operation. For long term use the electrolyte must be
compatible with the sensor wires. Also the sensing current should be as
low as possible. Three or fours wires could be used for higher accuracy
in ratiometric mode.

See this site for a capacitive version:
http://www.euronet.nl/users/ragman/robot1.html

- Wayne Foletta
       BMI - Saratoga, CA

1998\01\22@150501 by Wayne Foletta

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John:

Sorry if I did not give enough details on what I used.

The ohmmeter and saltwater is used just a quick test of operation. In
actual operation I said the electrolyte must be compatible with the wire
with a sensing current as low as possible. Even with AC excitation
contamination will occur if the current is too high (one reason AC
driven LCDs fade with time). The current is kept very low so that
Brownian movement gives a more constant reading with even DC. I used a
CMOS Op Amp with less than 10E-12A input currents and low duty cycle
pulsed mode of operation. The wire was 36 GA nichrome. The electrolyte
was ethylene glycol  with 2 mg NaCl and 50 mg Borax per 1000 cc.

- Wayne Foletta
BMI - Saratoga, CA

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>       {Original Message removed}

1998\01\22@152727 by Bob Blick

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> pulsed mode of operation. The wire was 36 GA nichrome. The electrolyte
> was ethylene glycol  with 2 mg NaCl and 50 mg Borax per 1000 cc.

Hi Wayne,

What sort of resistance did you get with that combination? The Fredricks
and Spectron sensors are about 1K Ohm, and the temperature spec is huge. I
suppose with ethylene glycol, yours would be also.

Cheers,

Bob

1998\01\22@155828 by jcp

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Hi all,
Another option for you could be the Analog Devices ADXL05 accelerometer.
This is extremely sensitive and costs about US$27.00.  The AD site has the data
sheet in PDF format.
The output has to be filtered to remove the high frequency noise and then
passed through a lookup table to produce an angle output (Sin func.)

HTH
John

> I deal with both these companies on a weekly basis. The particular Spectron
> sensor you refer to is a very expensive one meant for commercial aircraft.
>
> Both companies make a dual-axis sensor that is more affordable and gives
> two axes of output. $50 is about what it will cost in quantities of one.
>
KILLspamjcpKILLspamspamintsol.com.au
Integration Solutions
702 Henley Rd
Kangaroo Ground  Vic 3097
Australia

1998\01\22@173117 by TONY NIXON 54964

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>Another option for you could be the Analog Devices ADXL05
>accelerometer.

As long as you compensate for temperature errors.

Tony

For the beginner....
PicNPoke Multimedia 16F84 Simulator Assembler, and Tutorial.
Now with PicNPlay circuit simulator.
Plus animated Address Mode Tutor.

http://www.dontronics.com/picnpoke.html

1998\01\22@184552 by Wayne Foletta

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Bob:

Yes, it was not a zero tempco sensor! I will have to look up the lab
notes and get back to you. The sensor was used over a narrow temperature
range of 25¡C +/- 10¡C and the buffered solution compensated some. Also
the PIC lookup table did first order linearization and tempco
correction. Ah the power of these little chips.

If one needs sensor operation over a large temperature range - the
capacitive version would a better solution but the sensor and circuitry
would be larger.

- Wayne Foletta
BMI - Saratoga, CA

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