Searching \ for 'How to prevent light bulb theft in airport runways' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: www.piclist.com/techref/ios.htm?key=port
Search entire site for: 'How to prevent light bulb theft in airport runways'.

Truncated match.
PICList Thread
'How to prevent light bulb theft in airport runways'
1998\05\20@073642 by Pedro Drummond

flavicon
face
That's it, I have to come up with a solution. On small airports, people
steal light bulbs from the runway. How to prevent (detect) it ? And maybe
detect burn-out bulbs as well ?

Thanks in advance.


Pedro.

1998\05\20@085920 by Keith Howell

flavicon
face
1. I assume they are in some weatherproof window.
       Make it lockable.

2. Use bulbs that are incompatible with domestic ones

3. Monitor current consumption.
       When a bulb blows, current will drop by one bulb worth.

1998\05\20@102151 by ctm

picon face
> Use the same method that is used on construction sites: a regular
> looking bulb with a left hand thread.

Useless unless you have matching sockets.

1998\05\20@132015 by Alberto Smulders

flavicon
Hmmm... connect a fence electrifier to the armatures of the lights (make one
out of a car ignition coil, a 555 timer (or a PIC ???? - a bit overkill I
think.....), power transistor and a power
supply) - 100 % effective against theft....

Regards,

Alberto Smulders
InSAD - Encarnaci—n, Paraguay
spam_OUTinsadTakeThisOuTspamitacom.com.py



-----Mensaje original-----
De: Chris Matus <.....ctmKILLspamspam@spam@sprynet.com>
Para: PICLISTspamKILLspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU <.....PICLISTKILLspamspam.....MITVMA.MIT.EDU>
Fecha: MiŽrcoles 20 de Mayo de 1998 10:24
Asunto: Re: How to prevent light bulb theft in airport runways ?


>> Use the same method that is used on construction sites: a regular
>> looking bulb with a left hand thread.
>
>Useless unless you have matching sockets.

1998\05\20@141624 by Max Toole

picon face
What kind of lights have armatures?

1998\05\20@142346 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
 Well, I keep trying a method that does not really work, but maybe
they'll get used to it. They stael the bulb outside my place all the time,
so I took an indelible felt tip pen for glass marking (has some acid in it
or what, plus black ink), and wrote on the new bulb:

Stolen from: <my address>

 You would use a rubber stamp for this of course. Low tech, and might
work once they get used to the idea that it's indelible.

Peter

1998\05\21@044738 by Dr. Imre Bartfai

flavicon
face
I have a simple solution, assuming all bulbs own their circuit. You can
detect the voltage on a switch controlling a particular bulb. If there is
no voltage, then bulb is stolen or burn-out. Of course, you can detect it
with a PIC having ADC...


On Wed, 20 May 1998, Pedro Drummond wrote:

{Quote hidden}

1998\05\21@050657 by Dennis Plunkett

flavicon
face
>
>
>On Wed, 20 May 1998, Pedro Drummond wrote:
>
>> That's it, I have to come up with a solution. On small airports, people
>> steal light bulbs from the runway. How to prevent (detect) it ? And maybe
>> detect burn-out bulbs as well ?
>>
>> Thanks in advance.
>>
>>
>> Pedro.
>>
>>
>
>

It will be near impossible to stop the "Theft", unless the bulbs are placed
in a lockable enclosure that requires a special tool to undo. But even this
may not work, as the "Would be vandal" will take this on as a challenge! If
this is the case then even special light bulbs will not do, cause then they
will be stolen for the simple "fun of it". After you have made you bulbs
"Theft proof", you may also need to make then "bullet proof", as this is
generally the vandals next option.
This is a problem, as many small airports are unmanned at night, and a
carrier detect off a radio is used to turn them on. Perhaps the simple
solution is to have so many light bulbs, that not all of them can be stolen
in one night/week.

As for detecting the possible missing bulbs, that's quite simple. Use a
circuit to measure the current/power/voltage after a given period (Let the
bulbs warm up). If different by X watts, then missing bulb/s!


Dennis


-=====================================================================-

Dennis Plunkett: Embedded Hardware, Software design
NEC Australia DRMASS
Line Interface cards
TRX software
ISDN interface card
ph 03 9264-3867

-=====================================================================-

1998\05\21@051110 by Morgan Olsson

picon face
At 20:59 1998-05-20 +0000, you wrote:
>  Well, I keep trying a method that does not really work, but maybe
>they'll get used to it. They stael the bulb outside my place all the time,
>so I took an indelible felt tip pen for glass marking (has some acid in it
>or what, plus black ink), and wrote on the new bulb:
>
>Stolen from: <my address>
>
>  You would use a rubber stamp for this of course. Low tech, and might
>work once they get used to the idea that it's indelible.
>
>Peter
>
Some people might think of it as a signed souvernir?  ;)


/  Morgan Olsson, MORGANS REGLERTEKNIK, SE-277 35 KIVIK, Sweden \
\  EraseMEmrtspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTiname.com, ph: +46 (0)414 70741; fax +46 (0)414 70331    /

1998\05\21@055250 by tjaart

flavicon
face
Dennis Plunkett wrote:

> >
> >
> >On Wed, 20 May 1998, Pedro Drummond wrote:
> >
> >> That's it, I have to come up with a solution. On small airports, people
> >> steal light bulbs from the runway. How to prevent (detect) it ? And maybe
> >> detect burn-out bulbs as well ?
> >>
> >> Thanks in advance.
> >>
> >>
> >> Pedro.
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
>
> It will be near impossible to stop the "Theft", unless the bulbs are placed

If it is a really huge problem, you could build a constant currentsource for each globe. Set the
current so that the drop over the globe
is just right for it to work properly. If the thief takes the globe, the
voltage rises to it maximum (theoretically inf). It will arc over, destroying
the globe, and teaching the thief a valuable lesson in moral values.
If crawling home with soiled underpants doesn't teach him a lesson,
nothing will.

--
Friendly Regards

Tjaart van der Walt
tjaartspamspam_OUTwasp.co.za

|--------------------------------------------------|
|                WASP International                |
|R&D Engineer : GSM peripheral services development|
|--------------------------------------------------|
|SMS @spam@0832123443KILLspamspamwasp.co.za  (160 chars max)|
|     http://www.wasp.co.za/~tjaart/index.html     |
|Voice: +27-(0)11-622-8686  Fax: +27-(0)11-622-8973|
|          WGS-84 : 26¡10.52'S 28¡06.19'E          |
|--------------------------------------------------|

1998\05\21@093508 by g.daniel.invent.design

flavicon
face
Pedro Drummond wrote:
>
> That's it, I have to come up with a solution. On small airports, people
> steal light bulbs from the runway. How to prevent (detect) it ? And maybe
> detect burn-out bulbs as well ?
>
> Thanks in advance.
>
> Pedro.

1) Are the lights on all the time ?

2) Is there a cover under which equipment can be stashed ?

Assuming the lights are sometimes switched off to (make them cooler for
unauthorised removal)

electrical:
       a] is the lightbulb power on ?
       b] is the lightbulb drawing current ?
       c] when a] is FALSE then is the light bulb placing a low resistance
across the                 socket ?

mechanical:
       Can a micro/reed switch be used to physically detect bulb/cover removal
?
       Can tear gas or dye/paint be booby trapped to operate in event of
opening                     with out an authorised key ?

I assume that most lights are connected in parallel, which makes it more
diffucult to test these states at the switch board.

I also assume that the theives will not be fooled twice by the same
trick.(if still alive.)

This leave us with a minimum of feasible solutions:

I) Moniter each or random lightbulbs mechanically or electrically for
"gone" status.
  Also, back modulate a serial number on loss of bulb via a carrier
frequency super imposed on to the mains cables. This would probably best
be achieved with a PIC12C508, "super capacitor"(expensive), a current
transformer(made by you) and a few resistors and capacitors.   At the
switchboard end, another current transformer is used with resonant
capacitor and full wave bridge rectifier.)  Use of resonant construction
(at the CARRIER FREQUENCY, NOT at 50/60Hz) will allow reception of very
weak signals.   Off this current transformer another PIC part moniters
for carrier frequency and if two bulbs/covers are removed within a short
period of time, an auto-dialer places a phone call to the Law
Enforcement  (or Mafia)

II) Moniter the perimeter of the airport for foot falls or broken light
beams.   This is an indiscriminate solution, which may also trigger on
security and other legitimate visitors.

Personally I would go for a random introduction of micro/reed switch
monitering stations as per I) above. This would be reliable (depending
on how many installed) and would give good results.  If it is legal in
your area, then combining this with a tear gas booby trap would
guarantee a "Catch !".

Instalation could be made very simple:
The current transformer is made to transmit/recieve/collect power from
the mains supply cable. Several turns of the nutral wire are wrapped
around a two part current transformer(ferrite) and then it is closed to
complete the magnetic circuit.

A super capacitor normally recieves power from the current transformer
through a fullwave bridge rectifier.   On activation of the micro/reed
switch, the PIC sends a serial number modulated carrier frequency to a
low cost audio driver chip, which in turn is connected across the
current transformer coil.

The reed switch can activate the MCLR pin on the PIC, bringing it out of
sleep mode,
The PIC then takes the AUDIO chip out of standby mode and begins sending
serial number.

Probably a very small super capacitor would suffice to keep the station
alive for days of genuine "lights off".

I could design the basic application (less the autodialer) in a couple
of days based on my existing code. ( (I have my own fast I.R. transmit
and recieve code.)
Additional features could include EEPROM, data entry keypad and LCD with
logging of serial Nos/ Bulb locations, also a real time clock could be
used.

The burnt out bulbs could be detected with a light dependant resistor
ie- if power is on (current transformer is on) then light should be on.

Regards,
Graham Daniel.

1998\05\21@143510 by John Sanderson

flavicon
face
Hello PIC.ers,

>Subject: Re: How to prevent light bulb theft in airport runways ?
>
>What kind of lights have armatures?
..
3-phase bulbs. They make your eyeballs spin at 3000 RPM.
..
..
email from John Sanderson at
JS Controls, PO Box 1887, Boksburg 1460, Rep. South Africa
Manufacturer & purveyor of laboratory force testing apparatus
and related products and services.
Tel/fax: Johannesburg 893 4154    Cellphone 082 453 4815

1998\05\21@144040 by Peter L. Peres

picon face
On Thu, 21 May 1998, Tjaart van der Walt wrote:

> If it is a really huge problem, you could build a constant currentsource for e
ach globe. Set the
> current so that the drop over the globe
> is just right for it to work properly. If the thief takes the globe, the
> voltage rises to it maximum (theoretically inf). It will arc over, destroying
> the globe, and teaching the thief a valuable lesson in moral values.
> If crawling home with soiled underpants doesn't teach him a lesson,
> nothing will.

Oops. I don't know how to put this, but one should never, never catch the
thief. Catching thieves in civilized coutries is the Law's business.
Humble people who meddle with this Important Business are punished with
more ferocity than the thieves. Except, thieves are only sometimes caught,
since they cunningly hide away <G>, whereas the Good Citizens, always. Can
you give us an estimate, in Rand, for the hospital bill of the guy who
would have touched your current generator driven bulb ? ;)

(I did not want to mention a small design flaw: You need to operate a
sequencer and a vacuum relay, with the HV in parallel with the bulb power.
When the thief breaks the circuit, the vacuum relay separates the supply,
and then HV is turned on... otherwise the HV will harmlessly arc across
the socket contacts - Just thought I'd be thorough on this safety hazard
related solution <G>, and mention that a PIC would make a good sequencer
for this ;)

Peter

1998\05\22@032251 by Pasi T Mustalahti

picon face
On Thu, 21 May 1998, Dennis Plunkett wrote:

> >
> >
> >On Wed, 20 May 1998, Pedro Drummond wrote:
> >
> >> That's it, I have to come up with a solution. On small airports, people
> >> steal light bulbs from the runway. How to prevent (detect) it ? And maybe
> >> detect burn-out bulbs as well ?
> >>
PTM:
1. Close the bulbs to a safe in the basement, close a tiger to the same
room and write a message to the door: 'beware, tiger'.
2. Hang a message to appropriate places: 'Free light bulbs next room'. So
they don't steal any, when they expect free ones. Then you can have a
empty box in the next room with a text 'sorry, we ran out of free bulbs'.

Still nothing about a PIC ?

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
PTM, KILLspampasi.mustalahtiKILLspamspamutu.fi, RemoveMEptmustaTakeThisOuTspamutu.fi, http://www.utu.fi/~ptmusta
Lab.ins. (mikrotuki) ATK-keskus/Mat.Luon.Tdk                    OH1HEK
Lab.engineer (PC support) Computer Center                       OI7234
Mail: Turun Yliopisto / Fysla, Vesilinnantie 5, 20014
Pt 02-3336669, FAX 02-3335632 (Pk 02-2387010, NMT 0400-555577)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

1998\05\22@131531 by ape

flavicon
face
And then call an attorney and prepare for your lawsuit after a dead body
ends up on the runway!  (Some people have weak hearts)

Take a photo transistor and put it in the housing in such a way that only
the bulb will give it a good transition (protection from sunlight tripping
it). After you convert it to a digital signal you can do with it what you want.

Alberto Smulders wrote:

{Quote hidden}

1998\05\22@153848 by Allen Demers

flavicon
face
On 05/22/98 07:42:18 you wrote:
>
>And then call an attorney and prepare for your lawsuit after a dead body
>ends up on the runway!  (Some people have weak hearts)
>
>Take a photo transistor and put it in the housing in such a way that only
>the bulb will give it a good transition (protection from sunlight tripping
>it). After you convert it to a digital signal you can do with it what you want.
>
>snip<

If only you could get the fellons to understand that they may have to deal with
the lawyers and
oodles of red tape that would be deterent enough!  :)

Allen

1998\05\22@154842 by Marc Heuler

flavicon
face
Hi Morgan (Morgan Olsson), in <EraseME3.0.3.32.19980521111028.00957380spamolga.swip.net> on May 21 you wrote:

> >so I took an indelible felt tip pen for glass marking (has some acid in it
> >or what, plus black ink), and wrote on the new bulb:
> >
> >Stolen from: <my address>

A bar here had ashtrays with such a label.  They were stolen more often
than any other ashtrays in town.  Now they changed to Marlboro and have no
more problems.

1998\05\22@182636 by Pete Klammer

flavicon
face
I like the current-monitoring idea; you just have to divide the system into
subcircuits whose current you can resolve (as someone else noted, say, 20
bulbs per circuit, with 5% resolution), but maybe you have circuits fused
this way already anyway.  But this only works while current is flowing.
When the lights are off, can you leave a low, non-illuminating, voltage
running, and can you monitor that current?

Another idea: how about time-domain reflectometry (TDR?)  It's highly
successful and well developed in ethernet LAN wiring: send a sharp "ping"
down the wire and listen for the "echoes".  You can see shorts, opens, and
taps, resolved to a meter or so.  On an ethernet, it can be conducted while
the LAN is live -- I don't know whether the device sends a "keep off"
warning signal before the "ping" or if it just relies on the network's
normal error recovery.  In this lightbulb application, you have the
additional challenge of regognizing the signatures of hot bulb filaments as
well as cold ones, if you can can briefly remove line current (less than
1/30 second?) to strobe the circuit while lamps are on.

Peter F. Klammer / RemoveMEPKlammerEraseMEspamEraseMERacom.com
Racom Systems, Inc. / 6080 Greenwood Plaza Blvd / Englewood CO 80111
(303)773-7411 / FAX:(303)771-4708


-----Original Message-----
From: Pedro Drummond [RemoveMEpdrummondspam_OUTspamKILLspamIBM.NET]
Sent: Wednesday, May 20, 1998 2:52 AM
To: RemoveMEPICLISTTakeThisOuTspamspamMITVMA.MIT.EDU
Subject: How to prevent light bulb theft in airport runways ?


That's it, I have to come up with a solution. On small airports, people
steal light bulbs from the runway. How to prevent (detect) it ? And maybe
detect burn-out bulbs as well ?

Thanks in advance.


Pedro.

1998\05\22@191759 by David VanHorn

flavicon
face
>That's it, I have to come up with a solution. On small airports, people
>steal light bulbs from the runway. How to prevent (detect) it ? And maybe
>detect burn-out bulbs as well ?



Use low voltage bulbs, say 48V.  They won't last an instant at home, and
you'll
not have any repeat thefts.   The downside is that the current doubles.

Higher voltage bulbs could work too, but unless you use 220, they will be
prised as "forever" bulbs, and you'll probably have MORE losses.

1998\05\24@081651 by Stig Brautaset

flavicon
face
Sorry about the slow responce on this one, but I have been away and would
like to comment this thread. Personally, I like this advice best so far...
:-)

quote:"

From: Alberto Smulders <EraseMEinsadspamspamspamBeGoneITACOM.COM.PY>
Emne: Re: How to prevent light bulb theft in airport runways ?

Hmmm... connect a fence electrifier to the armatures of the lights (make one
out of a car ignition coil, a 555 timer (or a PIC ???? - a bit overkill I
think.....), power transistor and a power
supply) - 100 % effective against theft...."

quote end

Could get problems with local authority though, if anyone with a hearth
condition comes along, trying to snatch one of your bulbs. The most humane
resolution would be mounting the bulbs in waterproof, lockable covers, as
already listed. If this not seem to be possible, the best thing would be to
use sockets with irregular dimension or shape. There is plenty of these to
choose from.


regards, Stig

------------------------------------------------------------
Stig Brautaset
Norwegian electronics student
RemoveMEsbrautasKILLspamspamc2i.net
http://home.c2i.net/sbrautas
------------------------------------------------------------

1998\05\24@081658 by Stig Brautaset

flavicon
face
Sorry about the slow response on this one, but I have been away and would
like to comment this thread. Personally, I like this advice best so far...

:-)

Quote:"

From: Alberto Smulders <insadSTOPspamspamspam_OUTITACOM.COM.PY>
Topic: Re: How to prevent light bulb theft in airport runways?
Hmmm... Connect a fence electrifier to the armatures of the lights (make one
out of a car ignition coil, a 555 timer (or a PIC ???? - a bit overkill I
think.....), power transistor and a power
supply) - 100 % effective against theft...."

Quote end.
Tjaart van der Walt also had a very good solution, but somewhat more
difficult to accomplish, I would think. :-) Both could get problems with
local authority though, if anyone with a hearth condition comes along,
trying to snatch one of your bulbs. The most humane resolution would be
mounting the bulbs in waterproof, lockable covers, as already listed. If
this not seem to be possible, the best thing would be to use sockets with
irregular dimension or shape. There are plenty of these to choose from.

Regards, Stig
------------------------------------------------------------
Stig Brautaset
Norwegian electronics student
spamBeGonesbrautasSTOPspamspamEraseMEc2i.net
http://home.c2i.net/sbrautas
------------------------------------------------------------

1998\05\25@133021 by Madis Kaal

flavicon
face
This does not prevent theft, but is more PIC related that the
prvention suggestions.

If you don't mind running some wire along the runways, why not
put a photocell next to each bulb so that you can detect
darkness, daylight and bulb on levels, use 1 PIC for each 8
lamps and network them to one master PIC that can monitor the
state of the power for lamps and turn them on and off. Attach
a cheap modem to the master PIC and you have a complete control
circuit which can be made to monitor all lamps, test them and
have slave pics calibrate themselves under software control.
You can have it to dial up some other system and send lamp
status for a whole field periodically, give alarm if more
than one lamp goes out in a given time period. Master could
have one photocell which it monitors to detect the brightest
daylight and darkest nighttime to calibrate the lamps automatically
every day. If you have some free code space, you can also add a
dial-up server that would allow some other system poll your lights
monitor for lamp status and draw a runway map with the real light
status.

If you make up your network so that each PIC is a repeater for next
one, you can run it to great lengths and also have ability to detect if
any of these is broken or stolen.

I don't know much about your airfield, maybe it's a huge overkill but
it would sure be fun to build :)

1998\05\26@175804 by Tom Handley

picon face
  As a pilot this sort of thing `scares the hell out of me'... I'm use to
flying in and out of uncontrolled airfields. My first thought is to work
with local law enforcement as this crime can result in death or injury. If
the FBO can afford it, he/she should hire a security agency or at least one
attendant. Having followed this discussion, one thing that still confuses me
is; what good would it do to detect missing lights if no one is around to
replace them and/or warn pilots? I would assume the FBO would have the
lights inspected during the day.

  If I missed something and there really is an attendant at night, and
he/she cannot monitor the runway, and they won't hire security personnel,
then look at perimeter security around the runway. This ranges from simple
devices on a fence to Microwave and LASER sensors (or fences) which are
fairly common and they do not interfere with aircraft systems or pilot
vision.

  Failing the above, then look at existing commercial runway lighting
systems that provide computer control and monitoring and are approved by the
FAA. While it's interesting and educational to look at exotic solutions,
this problem requires something proven and reliable. Human lives and
property are at stake here...

  The `bottom-line' is that the FBO should concentrate on security and deal
with the source of the problem. It's hard enough to land at night without
ILS aids and the usual daylight visual queues. Missing lights are a
`recipe for disaster' whether they are monitored or not...

  - Tom

1998\05\30@045831 by Kirk Wood

picon face
After reading all the methods that have come about I have had quite a few
chuckles. But one thing that comes to mind as an idea might just really work
and has some possibility. I would assume that part of what makes the bulbs
easy to steal is that they are cool to the touch. If the bulbs heat up fast
enough you could install a system to sense when somebody is near the field
and light up the bulbs. Then they would be hot to the touch and it would
discourage theft.

Another idea is that if there is a particular night that is more prone to
theft si out with a spotlight and hit the would be theives with a high power
spot light as they enter the field. This would rattle some of the petty
theives and discourage theft as well. Seasoned theives would not be easily
rattled this way, so you could combine this with video tape and play it to
the proper people.

Kirk Wood
  KILLspamWhat4spamBeGonespamconcentric.net

1998\05\30@153612 by Alan King

picon face
Make it mechanically difficult to remove the bulbs in working order.
Take a dremel tool and score the glass where the bulb narrows.  Make the
line around 1/2" above the base, and get some cheap tongs and rubber
coat the ends so you can grab that area near the base to tighten the
bulbs.  Make the cut just deep enough into the glass to weaken it so
that pretty much all break on trying to remove.  You don't care if they
break when you replace them, and when they can't get intact working
bulbs they will stop trying.  You want to make them fragile enough so
even if they use tongs to grab the base they would still be likely to
break them in transport and handling.  Maybe even score some lines up
over the blub as well, so it will break and cut them that first time
they grab one and don't know.  Once bitten, twice shy!  Just make sure
and do a test batch first to tell if the scoring shortens the life of
the bulb..

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 1998 , 1999 only
- Today
- New search...